(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Cornell University- New York Hospital School of Nursing Announcement"

,'>.:>'.■•;• 






■MM 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/cornelluniversit19551960corn 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 



AnfiouHcemmt of the 

Cornell Umversity - J^ew york Hospital 

School of J^ursing 



TERM DATES 1955-1956 

Sept. 26, 1955 — Dec. 18, 1955 
Dec. 19, 1955 - March 11, 1956 
March 12, 1956 - June 3, 1956 
June 4, 1956 - Sept. 23, 1956 
Sept. 24, 1956 -Dec. 16,1956 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of New 
York. It is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, 
which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from York 
Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is in the Nurses Residence at the corner of York 
Avenue and 70th Street. 

The 65th Street crosstown bus, M-7, east-bound, runs to York 
Avenue and 70th Street. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two weeks 
throughout the year. Volume 47. Number 3. July 29, 1955. Second- 
class mail privileges authorized at the post office at Ithaca, New York, 
December 14, 1916, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

A list of the Announcements will be found on the inside back cover. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ITHACA, NEW YORK 

Cornell University -New York Hospital 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1955-1956 

1320 YORK AVENUE, NEW YORK 2L N. Y. 



CONTENTS 



Calendar 3 

The Preparation of Today's Professional Nurse . . 4 

Accreditation 5 

State Registration for Graduates 5 

History 6 

Facilities for Instruction 8 

Admission 10 

Promotion and Graduation 13 

Health Service 15 

Vacations and Absences 15 

Student Life and Activities 16 

Basic Nursing Progiam 19 

Fees and Expenses 24 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 27 

Description of Courses 29 

Administration 37 

Faculty 40 

Associated with the Facidty 45 

Students in the School 50 

Index 55 

Picture Credits: 
Percy W. Brooks, Paul Parker 



CALENDAR 



1955 



Sept. 


21 


Wednesday 


Commencement Day 


Sept. 


24 


Saturday 


Registration Day 


Oct. 


12 


JVcdriesday 


Holiday: Columbus Day (for all students except 
Freshmen)* 


Nov. 


24 


Thursday 


Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 


Nov. 


25 


Friday 


Holiday: Freshmen only 


Dec. 


24 


Saturday 


Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 


Dec. 


26 


Monday 


Holiday: for Christmas 
1956 


Jan. 


2 


Monday 


Holiday: for New Year's Day 

and last day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 


Feb. 


22 


Wednesday 


Holiday: Washington's Birthday 


May 


30 


Wednesday 


Holiday: Memorial Day 


July 


4 


Wednesday 


Holiday: Independence Day 


Sept. 


3 


Monday 


Holiday: Labor Day 


Sept. 


20 


Thursday 


Commencement Day 


Sept. 


22 


Saturday 


Registration Day 


Oct. 


12 


Friday 


Holiday: Columbus Day 


Nov. 


22 


Thursday 


Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 


Dec. 


22 


Saturday 


Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 


Dec. 


25 


Tuesday 


Holiday: Christmas Day 



Jan. 1 Tuesday 

Feb. 22 Friday 

May 30 Thursday 

July 4 Thursday 



1957 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

Holiday: \\^ashington's Birthday 

Holiday: Memorial Day 

Holiday: Independence Day 



*(Freshmen will receive this holiday in connection with Thanksgiving holiday.) 



THE PREPARATION OF TODAY'S 
PROFESSIONAL NURSE 

Professional Nursing is continually growing and expanding in its 
efforts to bring better service to more people. The broadening concept 
of health care which includes the maintenance of health, the prevention 
of illness and the fullest possible rehabilitation of all patients, has 
brought with it, not only the need for more nurses, but for better quali- 
fied practitioners. Nursing is an important part of all care in hospitals 
and is also reaching people in homes, factories, schools, offices, clinics. 
The recipients of these services include people in all stages of health 
and in all age groups. 

The scope of activity of the modern nurse also increases as the bounda- 
ries of knowledge are pushed back in the field of health. To qualify for 
professional practice today requires a great deal more than skill in tech- 
niques, for the nurse is constantly called upon to exercise judgment 
based on expert knowledge and understanding, to identify nursing 
problems and to decide upon a course of nursing action. Physical and 
mental illness is often caused by conditions in the home, on the job or 
in the community. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse understand 
personal relationships, the role of the family, the process of growth and 
development and community organization for meeting health needs. 
Her education must provide her with a sound foundation not only in 
the social and biological sciences, but also in the humanities. 

The nurse needs to possess skill as a teacher and her instructions will 
encompass not only her patients and their families, but non-professional 
co-workers such as the practical nurse and nurse's aide. To the extent 
that she can give leadership in these relationships, nursing care is sub- 
stantially increased in both quantity and quality. It is important for the 
nurse herself to be physically well and emotionally mature. 

It is the aim of the School to provide those experiences which will 
help the student grow into the kind of person who can work well with! 
other people, can exercise judgment and implement her decisions in the 
practice of nursing; who will be motivated to make her maximum con-! 
tribution both as a citizen and a nurse, and will be aware of the neces-i 
sity for continuing study and investigation to help meet the changing 
health needs of society as they evolve. 

As a student she will participate in group planning with other practi- 
tioners in the health field in order to gain an appreciation of the meaui 
ing and importance of comprehensive care. She will be introduced to thei 
principles underlying effective leadership and function in a guidingj 



SI 



STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 5 

capacity to less skilled workers who are included in the nursing "team." 
Immediately upon completion of the program, the graduate should 
be prepared to contribute eflectively in beginning positions in hospitals, 
public health agencies and in the many other situations requiring cap- 
able nursing service. After a reasonable period of this kind of experience 
she should be capable of providing leadership over a wide range of co- 
ordinated activities in such positions as that of the hospital Head Nurse 
or the Senior Staff Nurse and Senior Advisor in a Public Health Agency. 
Her basic program has been planned to provide a sound foundation for 
advanced study leading to increasing responsibilities in such fields as 
teaching, administration, research and writing. 



ACCREDITATION 

The School is accredited by the Accrediting Service of the National 
League for Nursing as one of a small number of collegiate schools 
which prepares students for professional practice in public health 
nursing as well as for practice in hospitals and in other fields of 
nursing. The School is a member of the Department of Baccalaureate 
and Higher Degree Programs of the National League for Nursing and 
meets the requirements of the New York State Department of 
Education. 



STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 

Graduates who are citizens are eligible for admission to the examina- 
tion for licensure administered by the Regents of the State of New 
York and are expected to take the first examination given after comple- 
tion of the nursing course. Satisfactory completion of this examination 

Jclassifies the graduate of the School as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in 
the State of New York. Having become registered in New York State, 
it is possible to apply for registration without examination in other 
states. In New York State, if citizenship is not completed within seven 
years from the declaration of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

The New York State Nurse Practice Act states that a nurse must be 
licensed by examination in the state in which she was graduated. For 

ml this reason, graduates of this School are urged to take State Board ex- 
aminations in New York State rather than in another state as they 
may wish to practice in New York State at a future date. 



HISTORY 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing was 
established as a School in Cornell University in 1942, on the 65th an- 
niversary of the founding of The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
one of the earliest nursing schools in the country. The School is part of 
The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center which includes also 
the Cornell University Medical College and the various adjoining build- 
ings of The New York Hospital, extending from 68th to 71st Street on 
the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society of the New York 
Hospital and Cornell University, committed to a four-fold purpose in 

(1) care of the sick, providing the same wisdom and skill to rich and poor; 

(2) education of doctors and nurses, research workers, technicians and 
others who will work in the field of medical science; (3) research to ex- 
tend the boundaries of knowledge in the health fields; (4) promotion of 
public health through the development of preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second oldest voluntary hospital in this 
country, its Royal Charter having been granted in 1771, in the reign of 
King George III. The first patients were soldiers wounded in the Revolu- 
tionary War. At that time the Hospital w^as located on the lower end of 
Manhattan, the only part of the City then settled, and on early maps the 
location was designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Early in its history the Hospital pioneered in introducing vaccination 
for smallpox for the first time in America, in introducing temperature 
charts now standard practice in hospitals, in the use of anesthetics, and 
in caring for the mentally ill as sick persons needing medical care rather 
than as outcasts fit only for prison or the almshouse. Today the Center 
continues to pioneer in significant new programs including studies in 
psychosomatic medicine, in planning for and teaching comprehensive 
medical care, research to ascertain the causes of alcoholism, establish- 
ment of an ambulatory transfusion clinic, and in bringing rehabilitation 
into all medical care. 

Cornell University with its campus in Ithaca, New York, recei\ed its 
charter in 1865, nearly 100 years after the Hospital had been chartered. 
It received its first endowment from the Federal Government's Educa- 
tional Land Grant in 1852. The appropriation under the Morrill Act 
was to endow a college "where the leading object shall be ... to teach 
such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechani- 



HISTORY OF SCHOOL 7 

cal arts." This was the beginning of a remarkable system of higher edu- 
cation. However, it received its greatest impetus through the vision and 
generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under the influence of Andrew D. 
White, his colleague and later the first president, determined the form of 
the new University. In 1864, an agi cement was reached with the legis- 
lature of New York State which resulted in the founding of "a Uni- 
versity of a new type . . . an institution where any person can find 
instruction in any study." This combination of federal, state and private 
interests and resources is unique. It gives strength to the organization, 
broadens the aims and the policies of the University, and extends the 
influence of its educational ideals. The Medical College and the School 
of Nursing are the two schools of the University which are located in 
New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over 100 years before a school 
for the training of nurses was opened. There had been early steps taken, 
however, to improve the care given to patients and even in 1799, Dr. 
Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician had organized a 
series of lectures combined with a course of practical instruction in the 
wards ^vhich was given to the women who ^vere engaged by the Hospital 
at that time as "watchers" and "nurses." Although the theoretical con- 
tent was meager and the practical instruction not systematically planned, 
these classes focused attention on the fact that w^omen who had some 
preparation for their work gave better care than those without instruc- 
tion. AVlien in 1873 the first training school on the Nightingale pattern 
was to be opened in this country at Bellevue Hospital, the Governors 
of The Society of the New York Hospital contributed to the support of 
this school. Four years later, in 1877, when the Hospital moved to new 
buildings. The New York Hospital Training School for Nurses was 
opened in quarters which were considered to have all the modern im- 
provements of the times. The School moved to the present location when 
the present Medical Center was opened in 1932. 

The health needs of the community and country have been the driving 
force in the development of the School which has strengthened its pro- 
gram to keep pace with these needs. Today the work of the professional 
nurse requires a great deal more of her than in the past and in recogni- 
tion of this, the University program was established in 1942. Since 1946, 
all students admitted to the School have been in the degree program and 
the School is now one of the largest collegiate schools of nursing in the 
country. An endowment fund for the School was begun in 1951 -^vhich 
as it grows will further safeguard the progress of the School for future 
de\elopment. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the Nursin? 
School. These include class and conference rooms, libraries, laboratorie 
and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching unit on the seconcj 
and ninth floors of the Nurses Residence while others are provided ir 
the Hospital and in the Cornell University Medical College. 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all th(' 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various agencies of the 
city and the surrounding community. 



LIBRARIES 



The library of the School contains a wide selection of materials per- 
tinent to nursing and related fields, and includes important medical 
and nursing periodicals, both current and in reference sets of bound 
volumes. There are additional small collections in each department neaii 
the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors. The library 
under the direction of a committee of the faculty, and in charge of a 
professionally trained librarian. The facilities of the Medical College' 
Library are also readily accessible and make valuable supplementary 
materials available to both the students and faculty of the Nursing 
School. In addition, the broad resources of the New York Public Library, 
the National Health Library, and many other special libraries in the! bei 
vicinity may be called upon whenever needed. 



CLINICAL SERVICES 



The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are superior for the 
care and study of patients. The Hospital is comprised of five clinical de- 
partments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided not only with 
facilities adequate in every way for the care of both in-patients and out- 
patients, but also with facilities for teaching and for the conduct ofjji,^ 
research. An unusual number of specialized clinical services are there 
fore available which are seldom found within a single organization. The | ^^^ 
Hospital has a capacity of 1,200 beds and during the past year 28,784 
patients were hospitalized and 43,200 were admitted as out-patients. The 
conduct of research in all clinical departments gives the student nurse 
an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the part which the nurse 
must be prepared to play in research projects. Authenticity of the find- 
ings in many studies depends to no small degree on the accuracy with L, 



api 



FACILITIES rOR LNSTRUCTIOX 9 

which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, observes and records 

I reactions. 
The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to general 
medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of 
i tuberculosis, medical neurology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and 
jthroat disorders, orthopedic, plastic and neuro-surgery, and ophthalmol- 
ogy. The Lying-in Hospital has a capacity of 20G adults and 102 new- 
borns and provides for obstetric and gynecologic patients. Each year 
approximately 4,000 babies are born in this Hospital. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 95 beds, wdth separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. Facili- 
ties for the recreation of convalescent children and the services of an 
occupational therapist offer opportunities for the nursing student to 
tudy the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick chil- 
dren. All students have Nursery School experience. Here the student 
works with and observes the development of the well child, and is thus 
d better able to evaluate deviations in behavior which may accompany 
illness. 

The Payne AVhitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity of 
108 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational and 
recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of psychiatric 
oatients. The close association between the psychiatric, medical and 
nursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a con- 
jultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the relationship 
Det-^veen mental and physical illness throughout her experience in the 
Hospital. 

The Out-Patient Department with its 82 clinics provides opportunity 
:or the study of a large number of patients who come for general health 
iupervision, diagnosis of disease and for treatment of disease that can 
De conducted on an ambulatory basis. Each year more than 250,000 pa- 
ient visits are made to this Department. 

Students assist in diagnostic tests, in treatments and in teaching pa- 
ients so that care without hospitalization can be effective. Arrangements 
"or continuity of care through use of referrals to public health nursing 
igencies are an essential part of clinic experience. Opportunity is pro- 
vided for participation in the guidance of expectant mothers through 
nother's classes and individual conferences and for study of the family 
pproach to health maintenance and care of children. 



COOPERATING COMMUNITY AGENCIES 

Experience is provided in family health counseling, bedside nursing, 
md in the appropriate use of community agencies through cooperation 



10 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York and the Visiting Nurse 
Association of Brooklyn. These agencies provide generalized family 
health services for patients in their homes. 

Additional experience in public health nursing in an official agency 
is available to a limited number of students through arrangements with 
the New York State Department of Health. Students with good scholastic 
records and a definite interest in public health nursing as a career are 
given preference among those who request this experience. 

Members of the staff of the New York City Department of Health plan 
with the faculty of the School for appropriate ways to contribute to the 
student program. The Kips Bay Yorkville Health Center serves the dis- 
trict in which the School of Nursing is located. It affords students an 
opportunity to observe the relationship between the New York City 
Department of Health and The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center. 

ADMISSION 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF REQUIREMENTS 



Nursing requires women of integrity and intelligence who have a deep 
interest in public service. Candidates are selected whose credentials in- 
dicate high rank in health, scholarship, maturity, ability to work with 
people, and who give evidence of personal fitness for nursing. A mini- 
mum of two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive of Physical 
Education) is required for admission. j ^^^ 

SELECTION OF A COLLEGE FOR THE FIRST TWO YEARS 

To meet the requirement of two years of college for admission, a very 
wide choice of colleges is available as the content of these two years isj 
general liberal arts and may be taken in any university, college, or junior 
college accredited by one of the regional associations of colleges and 
secondary schools. Applicants may therefore take the first two years at 
any one of a great many colleges throughout the country or in one of 
the colleges of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The work of the 
first two years required for admission to this School contains no nursing 
or "pre-nursing" courses and, therefore, selection of a college in which 
to take the first two years is NOT dependent upon its offering a pre- 
nursing program. T; 

Help in the selection of a college mav be obtained by referring to the 
list of STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL which appears at the back offluseof 



ADMISSION 11 

our School of Nursing bulletin as this list indicates the colleges from 
which students now in the School of Nursing have transferred. The list 
is, however, not a complete list of the colleges from which students may 
transfer. 

In selecting a college and registering for the courses of your first two 
years, read carefully the section below on Educational Requirements 
for Admission. 

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Within the two-year liberal arts program of the first two college years 
required for admission, only 15 credits are in specified subjects as 

follows: 

Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 

Biologv or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

\Vhile not a requirement, students are urged to obtain a course in 
sociology or social anthropology if possible. Other subjects which make 
up a desirable preparation for admission to the School of Nursing but 
in which there is no specified requirement are: 

Enolish, Literature, Human Relations, Historv. 

After planning for the above subjects, other subjects next in impor- 
tance depending upon the special interest and abilities of the student 
and the courses available are: 

Languages (may be of particular usefulness with patients and also 
for the many opportunities in international work and in ad- 
vanced study) 

Anthropology, Economics, Physics 

Art, Music 

Additional courses in physical or biological sciences (for students 
taking more than 60 credits) 

However not more than 12 hours of biological science can be 
accepted toward meeting the 60 credit hours required for 
admission. 

The program in the School of Nursing requires the student to have 
I good background in English composition, communications skills, and 
use of the library. Courses which are not accepted as fulfilling the 6-hour 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

credit requirements in biological sciences are human anatomy, physiol- 
ogy, and bacteriology, as these courses are included in the professional 
program after admission to the School of Nursing. In general the prin- 
ciple applies that those courses given within the School of Nursing can- 
not be credited towards meeting admissions requirements because there 
is no allowance within the School of Nursing program for electives j 
which can be substituted for courses already taken. 

Students on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca should confer 
early with their advisors in the college in which they are registered or 
with the Office of the Dean of Women. Advisors will be glad to assist in 
planning a desirable program. These students as well as students in col- 
leges other than Cornell should, however, communicate with the School 
of Nursing as indicated under Application for Admission. Each time you 
register for your courses during your first two years, it is suggested that 
you take this bulletin with you and review this section with your advisor. 
Applicants who do not meet in full the specific subject requirements for 
admission, but who have a good record of two or more years of college 
are encouraged to communicate wdth the School of Nursing for review 
of their credits and possible assistance in arranging for courses which 
can be taken in summer sessions. 



AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifica- 
tions, there are no definite age limits. In general, however, it is expected 
that applicants will fall within the range of 18 to 35 years. The results 
of a complete physical examination as well as those of a dental examina- 
tion must be submitted at the time of application. Inoculation against 
typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox will be required of all 
students before admission to the School. 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nursing, 
containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the form at 
the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. Ap- 
plicants for admission should include with their application an appli- 
cation fee of $5.00. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain 
psychometric tests are required before admission. The applicant is asked 
to meet the charge of $7.00 for these tests. 

A personal interview is considered an important part of the applica- 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 13 

tion procedure. Effort is made to fiave tfie applicant meet witli a member 
of the Committee on Admissions at the School in New York. If this is 
not practicable, a conference can often be arranged with an alumna or 
other qualified person living in the vicinity of the applicant's home or 
college. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants contact the School as early 
as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their programs 
in high school and college to gain the best possible educational back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal application 
should be made during the first term of the first college year if the appli- 
cant plans to enter this school after her second college year. When all 
application forms are received, including the report of the psychometric 
test and a transcript covering the first year of college work, and these 
appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted pending satis- 
factory fulfillment of all remaining requirements. 

A candidate for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon notifi- 
cation of this provisional acceptance to the School. This assures that a 
place will be held for her in the entering class, pending satisfactory 
completion of all admission prerequisites. The full amount is credited 
toward the gi aduation fee. The deposit is not refundable if the applicant 
docs not register. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

Each term is 12 weeks in length and the established system of gi^ading is 
a scale of F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. An average of C 
for each term is required for promotion without condition. A grade of C 
is required in the courses Fundamentals of Nursing and Pharmacology I. 
A grade below C in any clinical field of nursing practice or a term aver- 
age which is less than C places a student on condition. This must be 
removed by the end of the next term to insure further promotion. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the judg- 
ment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she can 
complete the course satisfactorily w^ithin a reasonable period of time. 

An F (Failure) in any subject may necessitate withdrawal from the 
School unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, in 
which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the instruc- 
tor, if the course is available. 



14 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the stu- 
dent to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory to it. 
A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a Pro- 
motion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice and her 
relationships with patients and co-workers are taken into account. A 
student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her work or who 
does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the qualifications 
which are important for a good nurse may be put on condition or asked 
to withdraw from the School. The School reserves the privilege of re- 
taining only those students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy 
the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal suitability for 
nursing. 

Parents or guardians of students under twenty-one years of age are 
advised when students are placed on condition or asked to leave the 
School. However, in general, the School reports only to students. Each 
student is kept informed of her progiess through frequent examinations, 
reports and conferences, and every effort is made to provide assistance 
and guidance which will help her to succeed. When it seems advisable ' 
a student may be asked to withdraw from the program without having 
been on condition. 



DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing is conferred by The Society of the 
New York Hospital. In order to qualify for the degiee and diploma, 
the student must maintain a cumulative average of C for the three-year 
program, and must have completed satisfactorily all of the theory and 
practice outlined in this catalogue. 



ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaureate degree before admission 
may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience. An ex-1 j, 
emption may be granted up to a maximum of 12 weeks. An average of B 
in theory and in practice throughout the course is necessary for fa\orable 
consideration. Exemption must be requested at the beginning of the 
last term of Unit III, approximately December 15th of the Senior vear. 



ite: 

all: 

oil.: 
T 



h 



ii 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Good health is of the utmost importance and students have readily 
available to them a well-organized health service which is maintained in 
cooperation with the health service of the Center. Provision is also made 
for hospital care. 

Upon admission to the School a physical examination by the school 
physician and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray is 
required every six months, and a physical examination during each 
school year. A Shick test is performed on all students after admission to 
the School; immunization to diphtheria is administered to those reacting 
positively. The Mantoux test is given during the pre-clinical period. 
Students receive dental health service consisting of a full mouth series of 
X-rays, examination by a dentist, a written diagnosis with suggestions 
for treatment, and follow-up supervision. For repair of dental defects, 
students are referred to their own dentists. 

In the event of short term illness requiring bed care, students are ad- 
mitted to a special floor of The New York Hospital which is maintained 
for this purpose. If more seriously ill, students are cared for on other 
floors of the Hospital within the limits of the Hospital's policy on ad- 
nissions and bed usage, and hospitalization up to the amount of eight 
weeks for any one admission is provided. Elective surgery is not included 
md if not taken care of before admission to the School must be arranged 
during vacations. Expenses for private nurses, transfusions and personal 
tems are borne by the student. The School reserves the right to collect 
ill hospitalization benefits available through third parties for any period 
)f care coming within the provisions of these benefits. 

The fees for health service, dental service and hospitalization insur- 
mce are listed under school fees in this bulletin. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a student's 
lealth makes it unwise for her to remain in the School, she may be re- 
quired to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any time. 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 

A vacation of four weeks is given each year in the first and second year, 

nd 23 days in the third year. Students entering with a baccalaureate de- 

ree, who have an exemption of time, will be given a terminal vacation 

ie n the third year. All vacations are arranged to conform to the require- 

lents of the program but usually fall within the Summer months. 

Because of the nature of assignments, a leave of absence usuallv neces- 

15 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 



sitates absence for an entire term. As result of absence, a student may be 
required to re-register for a course of study or a nursing practice period, 
or she may be transferred to a later class. Ibe 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES ' 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence adjacent to the Hospital. Every 
effort has been made in the construction and equipment of the Residence 
to provide for the normal and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are located 
on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively furnished single 
rooms with running water. Each floor has ample baths, showers, and 
toilet facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoinin 
kitchenette for informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this developmeni 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both curreni 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch oj 
the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

A large auditorium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sur 
roofs, television sets and a hobby room are also available. There ar( 
pianos for student use. Student activities planned jointly with the] 
Cornell University Medical College are a regular part of the recreatior 
and include glee club and dramatic productions. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool i; 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made) 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach equip 
ment and an outdoor grill are available. 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities, a Residence 
Director and a well-qualified instructor in Physical Education are irj pQr 
charge. House activities are planned by the House Committee, which ii 
made up of representatives of those living in the Residence, of staff mem 
bers living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available foi 
friends and relatives at a reasonable charge 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless ir 



i 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 17 

music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Committee, 
students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities as mem- 
bership in Town Hall Morning Lecture Course, the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, American Museum of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera 
Guild, Institute of Arts and Sciences, and the Student and Professional 
Ticket Service. 

An annual fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports the 
varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The Blue 
Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships for both 
medical and nursing students, the Christian Nurses' Fellowship and the 
Newman Club. Guest speakers and planned forums provide an opportu- 
nity for exchange of thought on many subjects. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule which 
is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all students. The 
Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, Judicial Coun- 
cil and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on Student Affairs 
acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organization and, with the 
Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty meetings which provide 
for informal discussions of school activities and problems. 

MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one or 
more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater prob- 
lem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course of study, 
freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature is important. 
For this reason it is held to be the responsibility of a student who is con- 
templating marriage during her period in the School to discuss her pro- 
posed plans well in advance with the Dean and to obtain permission to 
remain in the School. 

Under certain conditions permission to live outside the Residence may 
be granted to a married student provided in the judgment of the School 



18 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

this will not interfere with the student's School responsibilities. The 
faculty record their belief that responsibility for maintaining the quality 
of her work and for continuing participation in School activities must 
be accepted by the student. A married applicant is accepted if in the 
judgment of the Admissions Committee she meets these requirements 
and lives in the Residence for at least the first six months. 

Students anticipating marriage are expected to make plans which will I 
fit into their regular vacation or school schedule as leave of absence can \ 
rarely be granted except for an entire term. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The School maintains active counseling services which are available 
to any student who needs assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in her normal work in the School or in con- 
nection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that those 
students who need help on questions of educational program, finances, 
health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to those mem- 
bers of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in relation to 
the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for any 
student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase of her 
life while in the School of Nursing. 



PRE- 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the ten 
alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national profes 
sional organization of nurses, now known as the American Nurses' Asso 
ciation. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part of the Cornell 
University Alumni Association. 



Th 
Inea 
tioni 
disea: 
recei; 
tocoi 
inva 
ticipa 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years) . See pages 10-12. 
I Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

I Chemistry— (including laboratory) 6 

I Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology ^ 

I Suggested courses: 

History, Sociolog)', Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects 45 



Total (Pre-Professional) 

PROFESSIONAL (3 years). In the School of Nursing. 

Semester Hours Credit 
Units 



60 



Orientation 

Physical Education . . . 
Biological Science . . . . 
Biochemical Science . : . 

Social Science 

Nutrition 

Pharmacology 

Fundamentals of Nursing 
Public Health Nursing . . 
Clinical Nursing . . . . 



Total (Professional) 25 36 28.5 10 99.5 



I 


II 


III 


IV 




(No 


Credit) 






(No 


Credit) 




7 








3 








5 


2 




1 


0.5 


1 


1.5 




0.5 


2 






9 




4 
5 


5 




31 


18 


4 


25 


36 


28.5 


10 



Grand Total (required for B.S. in Nursing) 159.5 



THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum covers a period of three calendar years. 
In each clinical service, related classes, conferences, and bedside instruc- 
tions are given concurrently with practice and emphasis is placed on 
disease prevention, health instruction and rehabilitation. The student 
receives selected experiences in evening and night duty. An introduction 
to community nursing is provided through conferences and observation 
in various agencies assisting with health problems. The student par- 
ticipates in discussions centering around family health and assists in the 

19 



20 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

referral of patients requiring nursing care after hospital discharge. An 
eight-week period of supervised practice in family health service is pro- 
vided through affiliation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum as the 
need arises. The professional program, divided into four units of theory 
and experience, follows. 

UNIT I 

This unit consists of 24 weeks which are devoted primarily to class and 
laboratory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the 
pavilions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at Christmas 
time. Following are the courses presented: 

Course Class Wks. Semester 
Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credi 

Orientation 120 15 

Fundamentals of Nursing 121 325 7 

Mathematics Related to Drugs 122 15 0.5 

Anatomy— Histology 100 60 2.5 ' 

Physiology 101 45 2.5 

Biochemistry 102 60 3 

Microbiology 103 45 2 

Introduction to Clinical Nursing 124 30 2 

Early Growth and Development 106 15 1 

Psychosocial and Cultural Aspects of Nursing . .105 15 1 

The Community and the Nurse 107 30 2 

Professional Problems I 109 15 1 

Nutrition 130 12 0.5 

Physical Education 42 

Total 724 25 



UNIT II 

During Unit II, which is 52 weeks in length, the student is assigned to 
five clinical areas for theory and practice. These include the Out-Patient 
Department, the Operating and Recovery Rooms, Medicine, Surgery 
and Obstetrics. A vacation of three weeks is given in the summer. 

In the Out-Patient Department the student has an opportunity to 



leam 
fori 

11:21 

liiiii: 
atric 
seni 
joch 

JlKt 

It 

tecli: 
rice: 
thee 
iDidt 
kt 

in 
latec 
emb' 
The 
ioor 

I 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 21 

learn something of the medical and nursing needs of patients who are, 
for the most part, carrying on their usual life activities, while being 
treated for some health problem, or learning to live with some physical 
limitation. She is assigned to the clinics of medicine, surgery and pedi- 
atrics. During her in-patient experience on the medical and surgical 
services, she has experience not only on the "general" services but in 
such specialties as ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology and neuro- 
surgery. 

It is not anticipated that the student will develop a high degree of 
technical skill in the operating room. However, through supervised prac- 
tice and observations at the field of operation, and by participating in 
the care of patients in the Recovery Room, the ground work is laid for 
understanding of the nurse's responsibilities to the patient, not only dur- 
ing the operation, but immediately preceding and following it. 

In the \V^oman's Clinic, assignments for practice include activities re- 
lated to the newer concepts of maternal and newborn care, which are 
embodied in such terms as "preparation for labor" and "rooming-in." 
The student has experience in the Out-Patient Department, deliver)' 
floor, nursery and post-partum units. 

The progiam for this Unit is as follows: 

Course Class Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Principles of Medical Nursing 140 68 4.5 

Practice of Medical Nursing including 

Neurological Nursing 141 12 3 

Core Course in Operating Room, Surgical 

and Out-Patient Nursing 150 66 4.5 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 151 24 1.5 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 152 12 3 

Principles of Nursing in the Out-Patient Dept. . . 118 20 1.5 

Practice of Nursing in the Out-Patient Dept. . .119 6 1.5 

Principles of Operating Room Nursing 157 32 2 

Practice of Operating Room Nursing 158 6 1.5 

Principles of Maternity Nursing 160 78 5 

Practice of Maternity Nursing .161 12 3 

Historical Backgrounds of Nursing 108 30 2 

Pharmacology 123 30 2 

Diet Therapy and Cooking 131 36 1 

Physical Education 36 

Total 420 48 36 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

UNIT III 

This Unit is also 52 weeks in length and there is a four-week vacation 
during the summer term. An eight-week affiliation with the Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York, a family health agency, provides an oppor- 
tunity for the student to care for patients in their homes and to teach 
members of the family to give necessary care between visits of the nurse. 

During another eight-week unit of time the student considers the spe- 
cial nursing problems related to rehabilitation and to long-term illness, 
including tuberculosis. She visits various agencies and facilities in the I 
community which offer services to the aged and to those with special 
handicaps such as cerebral palsy. A 12-week assignment to the Pediatric 
Clinic and Division of Child Development includes experience in | 
Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant floor and the unit for 
older children. A similar 12-week period is spent in the Payne ^\^hitney 
Psychiatric Clinic where the student has an opportunity to gain a keen 
appreciation of the causes of mental and emotional illness, of the ways 
in which such illness may be pre\'ented, and knowledge of the newer 
methods of therapy for its relief. 

Experience is also provided in Diet Therapy and in Urological 
Nursing. 

The Program for this Unit is as follows: 

Course Class Wks. Semester 

Course Title No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Principles of Pediatric Nursing 170 75 5 

Practice of Pediatric Nursing 171 12 3 

Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 180 77 5 

Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 181 12 3 

The Nurse in Public Health 115 20 1.5 

Introduction to Public Health Nursing 116 30 1.5 

Practice of Public Health Nursing 117 8 2 

Chronic Illness and Rehabilitation (Seminar) . . 125 30 2 
Practice of Nursing in Chronic Illness and 

Rehabilitation 126 8 2 

Principles of Urological Nursing 153 15 1 

Practice of Urological Nursing 154 4 1 

Diet Therapy Conferences 133 8 0.5 

Diet Therapy Practice 132 4 1 

Physical Education 12 

Total 267 48 28.5 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 



UNIT IV 



23 



The last unit of the professional program is approximately 27 weeks 
including a vacation of 23 days. 

The student is now ready to accept almost complete responsibility for 
analyzing and planning to meet the nursing needs of selected patients. 
She returns for eight weeks to the service on which she had her first clini- 
cal experience as a Freshman and with a minimum of guidance plans 
and carries out the nursing care of patients who present difficult nursing 
problems. She functions as leader of the nursing "team" and is assigned 
to charge duty on a pavilion for limited periods of the day, evening or 
night. 

During a four-week period attention is given to the special nursing 
needs of orthopedic patients and to the facilities and services available in 
the Medical Center and in the community for their treatment and for 
rehabilitation. There is a two-week experience on the Gynecologic ser- 
vice and also on the Private Patient Pavilions. 

It is during this unit that each student chooses a special area of nursing 
for special attention and exploration. Her choice may take her into any 
part of the Medical Center or into other community agencies. Each year 
a few students who are especially interested in Public Health Nursing 
have the opportunity for experience with the New York State Depart- 
ment of Health, usually in a rural or suburban area. 

Courses and experience in Unit IV are: 

Course 

Course Title No. 

Principles of Orthopedic Nursing 155 

Practice of Orthopedic Nursing 154 

Principles and Practice of Gynecologic Nursing . . 162 

Practice in Care of Private Patients (M&S) ... 142 

Activities & Relationships in the Hospital Unit . . 127 

Professional Problems II 110 

Senior Experience 128 

Elective Experience 129 



Total 



Grand Total (Professional Program) 



Class 


Wks. 


Semester 


Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 


15 


4 




8 


2 




8 


2 




15 






15 








8 


2 




8 


2 


61 


24 

+4 
days 


10 


1472 


120 


99.5 




+4 






days 





FEES AND EXPENSES 

(Subject to variation or change) 

On Approx. Approx. Approx. 

Admission March 15 March 15 March 15 f, 
TUITION AND FEES {6 months) (12 mos.) {12 mos.) {6 months) 

(Application Fee $5.00) 

Matriculation $ 10.00 S lO.OO 

Tuition 140.00 |140.00 $130.00 $ 40.00 450.00 

Public Health Field Ex- 
pense 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 1.50 3.00 3.00 1.50 9.O0 

Health Service 6.00 12.00 12.00 6.00 36.00 

^Hospitalization In- I 

surance 4.80 9.60 9.60 4.80 28.8(1 

Dental Service 4.00 4.00 4.00 12.00 

Nursery School 5.00 5.00 

Graduation 25.00t 25.00 



§196.30 3168.60 3223.60 $ 77.30 $665.80 
UNIFORMS 
♦^Uniforms 8: Accessories . $ 91.52 $ 7.00 $ 98.r)L' 

Sweaters 5.25 5.2 

Shoes 12.75 $ 12.75 25.1 

Scissors Sc Name Pin . 3.37 3J 

Rental Laboratory Coat 1.00 I.( 

Rental Public Health 

Uniforms 7.50 7.5 

Graduation Uniform & 

Cap 9.25 9. 



$113.89 3 12.75 3 23.75 3150.3 

OTHER REQUIRED EXPENSES: Expenses in the first column, with 
exception of field trips, are paid on admission, but in later terms 
occur throughout the term rather than in one payment. 

Books &: Manuals 3 45.00 3 15.00 $ 10.00 3 5.00 3 75.0 

Gymnasium Suit 8.75 8.7 

Field Trips 3.00 3.00 30.00 4.00 40.0 

Student Activities & 

Handbook 6.25 5.25 5.25 le.*} 

xMeals x x 



3 63.00 3 23.25 3 45.25 3 9.00 $140.5( 
xxTOTAL FEES AND 

EXPENSES 3373.19X 3204.60 3292.60x 3 86.30 3956.69: 

24 



FEES AND EXPENSES 25 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon tentative acceptance for admission, a deposit of ^25. 00 is re- 
quired. This is credited as the graduation fee but is not refundable if 
the student withdraws her application or does not finish. On admission, 
payment is due on registration day for tuition and fees for the first six 
months, for the uniforms and certain other expenses listed. A statement 
of fees payable on that day will be sent to each accepted applicant shortly 
before registration day. 

The second payment of fees and tuition is due on approximately 
March 15 following admission and covers a 12 months period; the third 
payment is due the following March 15 for a 12 months period; the last 
payment is due on approximately March 15 prior to the fall graduation 



SPECIAL FEES: For change of schedule, classes, or clinical assignment, 
reinstatement following leave of absence— $10; special arrangement 
for examination— $2; specially scheduled clinical conferences— fee 
as for tutoring. For reasons judged adequate in exceptional circum- 
stances a special fee may be waived by the Dean. 

NOTES ON FEES LISTED ON OPPOSITE PAGE 

* Hospitalization Insurance is Associate Hospital Service— Blue Cross. 
See under METHOD OF PAYMENT for further information. 

** For the class entering in the Fall of 1955 the cost of uniforms and ac- 
cessories on admission is $40.52. 

x Meals during first 24 weeks and during Public Health field experience 
are paid for by the student as purchased, approx. $13.00 a week. 
Otherwise meals are furnished. 

XX Those few seniors granted additional elective of 8 weeks planned thru 
N. Y. State Department of Health meet additional expense of main- 
tenance. However, State stipends are usually available to meet this 
expense. 

f The deposit of $25 paid at time of acceptance is credited as gradua- 
tion fee and is deducted from final payment, not refundable if stu- 
dent withdraws before admission or does not complete program. 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

for the last 6 months period. Students are billed in advance. Fees become 
due on the first day of the March term and must be paid not later than 
twenty days after the first day of the term. 

The School reserves the right to change its tuition and fees in amount, 
time, and 7nanner of payinent at any time without notice. 

Articles listed on page 24 under UNIFORMS and under OTHER 
EXPENSES are purchased thru the School and obtained after admission 
in accord with instructions given to each student after admission. A list 
of necessary personal equipment will be sent to each accepted applicant 
shortly before registration day. 

Students holding hospitalization insurance at the time of admission 
are required to take out insurance thru the School as required for all 
students. Students pay one half of the cost and the other half is paid by 
the Hospital. Refunds for policies held on admission may be claimed 
at the office of former policy. 

MAINTENANCE AND UNIFORM 

With the exceptions indicated below, each student receives main- 
tenance consisting of room, an allowance for meals, and a reasonable 
amount of laundry. During the first 24 weeks in the School and during 
the eight weeks she is having experience with the Visiting Nurse Service, 
the student meets the cost of her meals which are paid for as purchased, 
at approximately SI 3.00 a week. During vacations and when in the elec- 
tive experience with the New York State Department of Health the stu- 
dent meets the entire cost of her maintenance. The uniform dresses and 
caps are provided for each student. These remain the property of the 
School and are returned on graduation or withdrawal. For the public 
health assignment, students are required to provide themselves with 
navy or dark tailored coats and hats appropriate to the season. Other 
items of uniform are listed under expenses. 



D:1C 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 

Several scholarshps are available each year usually in amounts of $100 
to $400 to students in need of financial assistance. These awards are open 
to both students entering the School of Nursing and those already in the 
School. Factors taken into consideration, in addition to financial need, 
are the student's all-round record as indicated by academic work, par- 
ticipation in school and community activities, and qualities indicating 
promise of growth and potential contribution to nursing. 

Application is made to the Dean, at the time of application for admis- 
sion to the School for entering students and not later than February 15 
for grants to be used in the period March 15 to March 15 by students 
already in the School. 

FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS-Established 

and maintained by a committee of women interested in the School of 
Nursing to assist girls who otherwise would not be able to prepare for 



JULIETTE E. BLOHME SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an 
endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial 
ito Juliette E. Blohme of the Class of 1922 through a gift of $6,000, the 
interest on which may be used in whole or in part each year. 

EMMAJEAN STEEL FULLER FUND-This Fund, begun in 1952 by 
the Class of 1952 in memory of Emmajean Steel Fuller, a former member 
of the Class, is available for an occasional scholarship. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND— Loans are available to students who have 
been in the School at least one term. Applications are made to the Dean. 
Although applications are accepted at any time during the year, students 
are encouraged to plan, as far as possible, for a year at a time and make 
application by February 15 for grants to be used in the period March 15 
to March 15. 

IRENE SUTLIFFE SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Through the generosity 
and foresight of the alumnae of the School and in honor of Irene Sutliffe 
^80, Director of the School, 1886 to 1902, scholarship grants are available 
to graduates of the School for post-graduate study. They are gianted 
primarily to alumnae who are qualifying for positions connected with 



the School of Nursing. 



27 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

For additional information on scholarships and gi ants-in-aid available 
to students taking their first two years of academic work at Cornell in 
Ithaca, write to Scholarship Secretary, Office of Admissions, Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ithaca, N. Y. 

The following three scholarships for residents of New York State, 
making application while in high school, are available for the first two 
college years as well as for the School of Nursing. 

STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents of New 
York State who are graduates of its common schools and academies. 
Annual award $350 for each of four years while in attendance in any ap- 
proved college in the State. This scholarship may therefore be used for 
the first two years of college required for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, and continues for the first two years in the School of Nursing. 
Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local high school 
principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE WAR ORPHANS SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and academies 
and who are children of deceased or disabled veterans of the United 
States. Annual award $350 towards tuition plus $100 for maintenance for 
each of four years while in attendance in any approved college in the 
State. This scholarship may therefore be used for the first two years of 
college required for admission to the School of Nursing and continues 
for the first two years in the School of Nursing. Awarded on the basis of 
Regents examinations under regulations of the State Education Depart- 
ment. Apply to local high school principal, or to Commissioner of 
Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE CORNELL SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents of New York 
State who are graduates of its common schools and academies. Annual 
award $200 reduction in tuition for each of four years. This scholarship 
may be used by students who take the first two years of their academic 
work at Cornell in Ithaca and for the first two years in the School of 
Nursing. Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local high 
school principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 







= Si 



^ 
C O 













Good nursing calls for constant adaptations within sound principles which draw 
from the facts of physical, biological, and social sciences. 




During her field assignment in Public Health Nursing, the student goes out into 
the community for experience in family health problems and care of the sick 
in their homes. 




^ 


bo 


o 


r, 


y. 


'7i 






•-J 


3 


z. 


^ 




!-J 


V 


o 






^ 





^ 






^ X 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 13-14.) 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

UK). AXATOMY -HISTOLOGY . A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student 
\\ ith the gross and microscopic structure of the hinnan body. It includes dissection of 
;lic cadaver by the student. Microscopic work consists primarily of the study of pre- 
pared slides. Pertinent information about embryology is included. 

I Hours. Unit I. Dr. BERRY, Dr. HAGAMAN, Dr. ANDERSON, Dr. NORRIS, Mr. 
1 AYLOR and Miss WRIGHT. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course consists of a study of the physiological systems and 
their integration into the total functions of the human body. It is closely related to 
the course in Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

45 Hours. Unit I. Dr. PITTS, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG, Mrs. McLEOD, 
Miss MILLER. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY^ A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism 
of food, and the composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

60 Hours. Unit I. Dr. du VIGNEAUD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GENGHOF, Miss 
KROOG, Miss MILLER. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particularly 
the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of infectious 
diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology and immunol- 
ogy to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 

45 Hours. Unit I. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE, Miss WRIGHT. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

105. PSYCHOSOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF NURSING. This course 
considers the ways in which social science concepts and methods may be incorporated 
and utilized in nursing. It deals with cultural, psychological and social components of 
human behavior w4th particular emphasis on the way such knowledge may be applied 
to total patient care. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Mrs. MACGREGOR. 

106. EARLY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. A course concerned with helping the 
student to develop an understanding of behavior patterns of all ages and under vary- 
ing conditions through the study of the factors which are influential in the lives of 
children. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Faculty from the departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Out-Pa- 
tients. 

107. THE COMMUNITY AND THE NURSE. "Community" in this course includes 
the Medical Center as w^ell as the district in which this School of Nursing is located. A 

29 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

study will be made of the environment in which families live and from which patients 
come to the hospital. Attention will be given to community organization for human 
services and the nurse's part in helping patients utilize resources for healthful living. 
30 hours. Unit I. Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

108. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF NURSING. An overview of the history 
of nursing from earliest times to the present, studying what has constituted nursing 
and tracing factors which have strengthened or weakened it. Presented against a 
background of developments in the general care and welfare of the sick such as the 
care of mothers and children, old people and the chronically ill, the mentally ill, the 
tuberculous and the evolution of hospitals, medicine and public health. 

30 Hours. Unit II. Miss DUNBAR, Miss WRIGHT and special lecturers. 

109. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS I. Consideration of the philosophical and ethical 
foundations of conduct and their application to the practice of professional nursing. 
Problems related to group life and relationships with patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by students and instructor for analysis and discussion. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Miss LYONS. 

110. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS 11. A reading course with 15 hours of class in 
which to bring into focus important professional problems for further reading. The 
purpose is to help the student understand important trends and developments in 
which she will need to play an intelligent part and which she will be expected to 
interpret to others. These include activities related to legislation, education, improve- 
ment of nursing services, costs of medical care, and international participation. 

15 hours. Unit IV. Miss DUNBAR and special lecturers. 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

115. THE NURSE IN PUBLIC HEALTH. A study of community needs with focus 
upon the total public health program. Emphasis is placed upon principles basic to 
public health nursing and their relationship to other services. 

20 Hours. Unit III. Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss BEISEL. 

116. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Emphasis is placed on 
developing an understanding of over-all policies, principles and functions as these 
relate to public health nursing practice. In addition, each student participates in 
four to six group discussion meetings of approximately two hours each, considering 
family situations known to them. The purpose of these group discussions is to 
strengthen and deepen the student's appreciation and understanding of the public 
health nurse's functions. 

30 Hours. Unit III. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE, and staff. 

117. PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Through carefully planned ob- 
servations, conferences and individual guidance the student is given increasing 
responsibility for health work with a selected group of families. This includes health 
supervision of mothers and infants, children of all ages and adults, as well as the 
care of the sick in their homes. This experience is provided by affiliation with the 
Visiting Nurse Service of New York and the Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn. 
8 Weeks. Unit III. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE and staff. 

(Elective Experience in Public Health Nursing: A few senior students who have 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

outstanding records in general, who have shown particular interest and promise in 
public health nursing, and who plan to enter this field of work in New York State, 
may be ofjered the opportunity for an elective experience with the New York State 
Department of Health. Courses 107, 115, IIG, 117 are prerequisite to this experience.) 



OUT-PATIENT (AMBULATORY) NURSING 

118. PRINCIPLES OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Nurs- 
ing care of ambulatory patients, both children and adults, is taught through demon- 
stration and informal family and community-centered conferences. Emphasis is 
placed upon health teaching, and the use of community resources in ensuring compre- 
hensive patient care, and also upon the cooperation of the nurse with other professions 
in a program for health maintenance and for the pre\ention and control of disease. 
20 Hours. Unit II. Mrs. SHAFER, Miss McIXTYRE, Miss SCH^VARTZ, Miss 
TSCHIDA. 

119. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Se- 
lected clinics provide experience in the pediatric, medical and surgical services. The 
student is helped to understand the value of continuity of patient care through work- 
ing closely with other departments of the Hospital and with community agencies. 

6 \Veeks. Unit II. Mrs. SHAFER, Miss McINTYRE, Miss TSCHIDA. 



FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND ALLIED COURSES 

120. ORIENTATION. These discussions give the beginning student a general concept 
of the field of nursing and of the responsibilities and obligations of the individual 
who chooses this profession. It emphasizes the importance of the physical and mental 
health of the nurses as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in her Avork. 

15 Hours. (Unit I 12 Hours; Unit II li/. Hours; Unit III li/o Hours.) Miss DUNBAR, 
Miss FREDERICK, Miss LYONS, Mrs". OVERHOLSER, Miss McDERMOTT, and 
the School Physician. 

121. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING. This course is an introduction to nursing 
practice and is designed to be a foundation for all of the clinical nursing courses. The 
student first learns to care for patients w^ho are ambulatory, then those who are in bed 
but enjoy a great deal of freedom of activity. She then proceeds to the care of patients 
on complete bed rest. "While the major content of the course is concerned with basic 
nursing procedures used in the hygienic care of the patient, in the diagnosis of disease 
conditions and in the treatment of illness, emphasis is also placed on the socio-dynamic 
factors in nursing. Consideration is given to interpersonal relationships, age and 
emotional problems, and problems of chronic and acute illness in the hospital and in 
the community. Beginning the tenth week in the program students have limited 
periods of supervised practice in the clinical divisions of the Hospital. 

325 Hours. Units I and II. Miss FUERST, Miss VAN ARSDALE, Miss BIELSKI, 
Miss KURIHARA. 

122. MATHEMATICS RELATED TO DRUGS. Designed to familiarize the student 
with the systems used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions 
and calculating dosages. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Miss MILLER. 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

123. PHARMACOLOGY. A course planned to help the student acquhe knowledge 
of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the nurse in 
the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and commonly 
used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, administration, and 
toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the nnportance of accurate administration of 
drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 

30 Hours. Units I, II. 

124. INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL NURSING. This course is designed to center 
the student's attention upon the need for informed observations on tiieir patients. 
Conditions commonly found on all clinical services are considered, i.e. pain, fever, 
unconsciousness; the patho-genesis underlying symptoms is explored. Laboratory 
specimens and films are used extensively and there is frequent patient participation. 
Nursing and medical classes are closely correlated in an effort to help the young stu- 
dent begin to analyze the nursing needs of patients as manifested by the signs and 
symptoms of illness. 

30 Hours. Unit I. Dr. KELLNER and staff. Miss WRIGHT and nursing faculty from 
all services. 

125. CHRONIC ILLNESS AND REHABILITATION. This course places emphasis 
on rehabilitation and deals also with the care and prevention of chronic illness. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the recognition of problems and needs of the patient as well as 
recognition of the nurse's needs in meeting these. Special consideration is given to the 
individual wuth tuberculosis. 

30 Hours. Unit III. Miss McCLUSKEY. 

126. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN CHRONIC ILLNESS AND REHABILITATION. 
This experience consists of practice in the Hospital as Avell as observation and field 
trips to many types of community agencies which cooperate in providing the care 
and service needed in rehabilitation of various types of patients and in the care of 
the chronically ill. Practice is carried out with selected patients; selection being made 
on the basis of age, life situation, economic factors, disability, goal and length of stay. 
Comprehensive care for these patients is emphasized and part of the practice is car- 
ried out cooperatively with fourth year medical students in the Comprehensive Care 
Clinic. Consideration is given to the particular contribution which the nurse can make 
in her relationships with patients and with health workers from other fields. This 
experience includes the care of patients with tuberculosis. 

8 Weeks. Unit HI. Miss McCLUSKEY and other Instructors. 

127. ACTIVITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS IN THE HOSPITAL UNIT. The student 
is introduced to the basic managerial activities and personnel relationships in the head 
nurse unit, and the interrelatedness of this unit with the entire hospital. Four areas 
of head nurse responsibility are considered: patient care, personnel management, 
unit management and interdepartmental relationships. 

15 Hours. Unit IV. Miss SIMMS. 

, 128. SENIOR EXPERIENCE. Each student returns to the service on which she had 
her first clinical experience. She plans and carries out the care of patients with complex 
nursing needs, and has opportunity to observe and participate in the management of 
the pavilion, including leadership in the nursing team. 
8 Weeks. Unit IV. Faculty from all clinical services. 

129. ELECTIVE EXPERIENCE. Opportunity is provided for the student to explore 
a special area of nursing in which she is particularly interested. This may include ex- 



DESCRIPTIOxX OF COURSES 33 

perience in one or more of the units in the Medical Center or in other agencies in the 
community. A few students may have the opportunity for experience with the New 
York State Department of Health. The student is guided in studying some limited as- 
pect of the field wiiich she has chosen. 
8 Weeks. Unit IV. All faculty members. 



NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION. A short course in normal adult nutrition based on the courses 
in Biochemistry and Physiology. A study of the functions and food sources of the major 
food groups, their availability in the world and in the community, the needs of the 
individual and the relationship of cultural patterns to food habits and nutrition are 
included. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are discussed 
during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services.) Lecture and recita- 
tion. 

12 Hours. Unit I. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 

131. DIET THERAPY AND COOKING. A course designed to present the under- 
lying principles in the treatment of disease by diet. It is accompanied by laboratory 
work in principles of food preparation, and in the preparation of foods and meals in- 
cluded in therapeutic diets. The course is supplemented by conference work during 
the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lecture, laboratory and recita- 
tion. 

36 Hours. Units I, IL Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 

132. DIET THERAPY PRACTICE. The application of the principles of diet-therapy 
to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the Hospital. 

4 ^Veeks. Unit HL Miss STEPHENSON and staff. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss KROOG. 

133. DIET THERAPY CONFERENCES. Through conference discussions, integrated 
with the practice assignment, the student is oriented to the practical application of her 
knowledge of nutrition and diet therapy in the care of hospitalized and ambulatory 
patients. 

Hours. Units II, III. Miss RYNBERGEN. 



MEDICAL NURSING 

40. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING. The principles and methods of nursing 
care for patients with medical, neurological and communicable disease are considered. 
Discussion of medical aspects of disease supplements and interprets reading concern- 
ing etiology, symptomatology, usual course pathology, complications, treatment, 
prognosis and prevention. 

68 Hours. Unit II. Dr. BARR and staff. Miss BROOKS, Miss PLACE, Miss STIRLING, 
Miss MALLORY, Miss EARLES. 

141. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL NURS- 
ING. Supervised practice is offered in the application of nursing principles to the 
care of patients on the medical and neurological pavilions of the Hospital. 
12 ^\ eeks. Unit II. Miss BROOKS, Miss PLACE, xMiss STIRLING, Miss MALLORY, 
Miss EARLES. 



34 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

142. PRACTICE IN THE CARE OF PRIVATE PATIENTS. This experience offers 
an opportunity for the student to become aware of the health needs of patients with 
varied socio-economic backgrounds. She also gains an appreciation of the varied 
methods of treating patients who have the same diagnosis. 
6 Hours. 2 Weeks. Unit IV. Miss POOR, Miss AGNEW, Miss MEYER WITZ. 



SURGICAL NURSING 

150. CORE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM, SURGICAL AND OUT-PATIENT 
NURSING. Lectures and demonstrations focus on the principles basic to the preven- 
tion, the etiology, and the control of disease in the plan for the total care of patients 
in the Operating Room, Surgical and Out-Patient Departments. 

66 Hours. Unit II. Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Departments of Operating 
Room, Surgery and Out-Patient. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. The fundamental principles of the 
nursing care of patients with general surgical conditions, surgical conditions of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat, and of the nervous system are presented by conference 
and demonstration. Emphasis is placed upon individualization of care including in- 
struction and rehabilitation of the patient. 

24 Hours. Unit II. Miss KLEIN, Miss DERICKS, Miss FOSTER, Miss HENDERSON, 
Miss FEDDER, Miss TRITT, Miss LIFGREN. 

152. PRACTICE IN SURGICAL NURSING. Planned experience in the application 
of nursing principles to the care of patients Avith general or special surgical conditions. 
This includes supervised practice in surgical asepsis, patient teaching, therapeutic 
team relationships and in planning to meet patient's needs after discharge. 

12 Weeks. Unit II. Miss KLEIN, Miss DERICKS, Miss FOSTER, Miss HENDERSON, 
Miss FEDDER, Miss TRITT, Miss HILLS, Mrs. GILKEY. 

153. PRINCIPLES OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. The anomalies and diseases of 
the genito-urinary tract are described and principles underlying the management 
and nursing care of these conditions are presented. Preparation of the patient for 
self-care on discharge is stressed. 

15 Hours. Unit III. Dr. MARSHALL and staff. Miss KLEIN, Miss SAWTER. 

154. PRACTICE OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Opportunity is provided for the 
development of understanding and skill in meeting the special nursing needs of 
patients with urological conditions during the pre- and post-operative phase with 
particular attention to the patient's need after discharge. 

4 ^Yeeks. Unit III. Miss KLEIN, Miss SAWYER, Miss HILLS, Miss HEYMANN. 

155. PRINCIPLES OF ORTHOPEDIC NURSING. Consideration of the medical and 
nursing problems peculiar to those patients w^ho are undergoing treatment for the ( 
correction of skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Emphasis is placed on prevention 
and rehabilitation, and the nursing principles which are basic to the care of all ! 15; 
patients. 
15 Hours. Unit IV. Faculty from the School of Medicine. Miss HENDERSON. 

156. PRACTICE IN ORTHOPEDIC AND REHABILITATIVE NURSING. Ex- jj 
perience includes the care of both ambulatory and hospitalized patients. Through i 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 35 

field trips the student has an opportunity to become familiar with the many services 
needed by the orthopedically handicapped and with the agencies providing those 
services. Each student has a three-day observation period in The Hospital for Special 
Surgery. 

4 ^Veeks. Unit IV. Miss KLEIN, Miss HENDERSON, Miss HILLS and other in- 
structors. 

OPERATING ROOM NURSING 

157. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Through lectures, discus- 
sions and demonstrations, students are taught the principles and methods of aseptic 
technique in relation to the care of patients at the time of operation. Immediate post- 
operative care is included. 

32 Hours. Unit II. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss SAFFIOTI, Miss JONES. 

158. PRACTICE OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Supervised clinical experience 
and study of the application of nursing principles to the care of patients in the Oper- 
ating Room. Students are given the opportunity to observe and assist with operative 
procedures, to relate this experience to the total care of surgical patients and to gain 
an appreciation of the qualities and abilities essential to effective nursing in this field. 
Experience in the Recoverv Unit is offered at this time. 

6 Weeks. Unit II. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss SAFFIOTI, Miss JONES, and staff. 



MATERNITY NURSING 

160. PRINCIPLES OF MATERNITY NURSING. A course planned to focus the stu- 
dent's knowledge of anatomy and physiology on the generative processes, and on the 
unique characteristics of the human infant. The emotional aspects of childbearing, 
and a family-centered point of view provide additional basis for integrating earlier 
foundation courses with this clinical specialty. The student is guided in application 
of theoretical knowledge to the nursing care of patients before, during and after the 
birth of the baby. The conference method encourages the student in self-expression as 
her understanding of the physical changes, adjustments and reactions of the patient 
de^•elops. Teaching techniques and attitudes are fostered by example and by explana- 
tion. 

78 Hours. Unit II. Lectures, conferences, films, special projects. Dr. DOUGLAS and 
Ijstaff. Miss RYNBERGEN; Miss HICKCOX and staff. 

161. PRACTICE OF MATERNITY NURSING. Students observe and care for mothers 
and newborn infants under supervision and with bedside instruction in the various 
techniques. Practice areas include Out-Patient Department, labor and delivery rooms, 
newborn nurseries and rooming-in units. 

12 Weeks. Unit II. Miss HICKCOX and staff. 

162. PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Functional 
knd anatomical conditions and new growths which may affect the female reproductive 
system are studied; their medical management and nursing care are described and dis- 
cussed in classroom and practice areas. Emphasis is placed on the scope of the prob- 
lems arising out of these conditions and the nurse's role in helping to resolve them. 

Hours. 2 Weeks. Unit IV. Dr. DOUGLAS and staff. Miss HICKCOX and staff. 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Pediatric Nursing presents a study 
of the representative disease conditions of infancy and childhood against a background 
of the normal physical and emotional needs of infants and children. Supervised ex- 
perience is directed to the effect of illness on the child and his family and to the use of 
nursing skills to aid his return to health. Correlated conferences, case presentations 
and role playing. 

75 Hours. Unit III. Dr. LEVINE and staff. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss STOKES, Miss 
ANDERSON, Miss RYNBERGEN and staff. 

171. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Selected experiences in the application 
of knowledge to the care of premature infants, sick infants and children, and children 
in the Nursery School. Group conferences, demonstrations and nursing care plans. 

12 Weeks. Unit III. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss ANDERSON, Miss STOKES, Miss DON 
DERO, Miss FRIPP, Miss SIMMONS and the staffs of The Division of Child Devel- 
opment and Nursery Schools. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course deals with the histor) . 
pathology and treatment of psychiatric illnesses. The aim is to help the student de- 
velop knowledge and understanding of the basic principles involved in the nursing 
care of patients with personality disorders, from infancy to old age. The whole pro- 
gram is oriented to help develop in the student an understanding of self and relation- 
ships to others, an objective attitude toward psychiatric illness and a broader ap- 
preciation of the nurse's role in helping the patient to solve the problems of his 
illness and rehabilitation. The student is introduced to the work of allied health 
professions and social agencies. There are demonstrations, conferences and seminars. 
77 Hours. Unit III. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss MUHS, Miss 
WEAVER, Miss SPARGO, Miss NEWBURG, Miss PAIGE, Mrs. HEWITT and staff. 

181. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The student receives supervised ex- 
perience in the observation and care of the emotionally ill patient during the acute 
phase of illness, convalescence and rehabilitation. She participates in currently ap- 
proved therapies, including psychotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies 
and somatic therapies (chemotherapy, electro convulsive therapy, insulin therapy, 
hydrotherapy, etc.). The student is also helped in the effort to create a therapeutic and 
rehabilitative environment for patients. Field trips, clinics and seminars. 

12 Weeks. Unit III. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss MUHS, Miss WEAVER, Miss SPARGO, 
Miss NEWBERG, Miss PAIGE, Mrs. HEWITT and staff. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. This course aims to develop in the student an interest in 
good body mechanics in work and play, and to teach her how she may apply this 
knowledge in her patient care. It also aims to develop interest and skill in those in- 
dividual activities which w411 enable her to use her leisure time to greater advantage. 
90 Hours (Total). Units I, II, III. Miss HIRSHBERG. 



ADMINISTRATION 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL- 
CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Director 
JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 



Arthur H. Dean 
Stanton Griffis 
pEANE W. Malott, President of the 

University 

foHN Hay Whitney, Vice-President 
H[amilton Hadley, President of The 

Society of the New York Hospital 
Henry S. Sturgis, Vice-President for 

Finance 

Frederick W. Ecker 



Board of Trustees 

of 
Cornell University 



Board of Governors of 

The Society of 
the New York Hospital 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



lite k 
ap- 
ple! 



£ 1. F. Hill, Chairman Provost of Cornell University 

Deane W. Malott President of Cornell University 

pRESTON A. Wade ^ ^ ,^ n -rr ■ 

k -, Y Trustees of Cornell University 

Cornelius N. Bliss, Jr "1 Governors of The Society of 

Mrs. Charles S. Payson J the New York Hospital 

3avid p. Barr . . . President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

^Irs. August Belmont Representative-at-large 

Dorothy V. N. Brooks Dean of Women, Cornell University 

VIrs. John Jay Cole President, Committee for Scholarships 

/iRGiNiA M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 

osEPH C. Hinsey Director, The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 
tliij!. Hugh LucKEY .... Dean, Cornell University Medical College 
lizabeth Ogden, '44 . . . Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

iENRY N. Pratt Director of The New York Hospital 

Iarian G. Randall .... Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

Nero York 

37 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D President of Cornell 

University 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Associate Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M. A Counselor oj Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Claire Calhoun, M.A. . . . Assistant Director of the Residence 

Jane Bevan, A.B Assistant in Public Relations 

Mary Jo Munroe, B.A., B.S. in L.S Librarian 

Mrs. Eileen Klein Registrar 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth RiDDiCK Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki, A.B Secretary to the Dean 

Carolyn DiEHL, M.D School Physician 

Mrs. Ena Stevens-Fisher Supervisor Nurses Health Service 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Miss Dunbar, Chairman Miss Poor, Secretary l| 

Dr. Barr Miss Hickcox Dr. Luckey Mrs. Shafer 

Miss Brooks Dr. Hinsey Miss Lyons Miss Schubert 

Miss Carbery Miss Klein Mrs. Overholser Miss Tuffley 

Mrs. Wright 

CHAIRMEN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admissions Miss Frederick 

Curriculum Miss Lyons 

Library . Miss Brooks 

Records Miss Walters 

Student Affairs Miss Stirling 

Scholarships Miss Dunbar 

Promotions: 

Unit I Miss Rynbergen 

Unit II Miss Van Arsdale 

Unit III Miss Stokes 

Unit IV Miss Sa^vyer 

Student and Staff Health Miss Beisel 

Affiliating Students Miss Anderson 



ADMINISTRATION 39 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Audrey McCluskey '44 President 

Marguerite Plow '30 Executive Secretary 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. John Jay Cole President 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
STUDENTS ON THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

Office of Dean of Men, Dean of Women Carolyn Hawes 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman) 

College of Home Economics Jean Failing 

Professor of Home Economics, Chairman of Counseling Service 

College of Arts and Sciences F. G. Marcham 

Professor of History 

RoLLiN L. Perry 

Assistant Dean 

College of Agriculture Howard S. Tyler 

Professor in Personnel Administration 
in charge of Vocational Guidance Placement 

lOffice of Admissions Robert Storandt 

Associate Director 



FACULTY 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., President of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriett Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of Nursing. 
(A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia University, 1930; Diploma, Bedford College 
and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, London, England, 1936.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F, Hickcox, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; M.A., 1951; Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in Hospital and 
School of Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Mary Eliz.abeth Klein, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columbia University, 1936; M.A., 1951.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N„ Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing; 
Director of Public Health Nursi?ig. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 
1944.) 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Associate Professor of Sciejice. (B.S., Simmons Col- 
lege, 1922; M.S., Cornell University, 1938.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing; Head of Pedia- 
tric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, West- 
ern Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia University, 1932.) 

Kathleen Newton Shafer, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. [Anatomy], University of Washington, 
1934; B.S. in Nursing, University of Washington, 1936; M.A., Columbia Universitv, 
1949.) 

40 



FACULTY 41 

Elizabeth U. Wright, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Xursing; Di- 
\rector of Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts 
JGeneial Hospital, 1927; B.S., Columbia University, 1947; M.A., 1948.) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

JElizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical Nursing; Department 

Head, Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, \Vashington University, 1939, 

iB.S., 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

i 

Muriel Carbery, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing 

Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School 

of Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of America, 1951.) 

Victoria Frederick, M.A., Counselor of Students. (A.B., University of Illinois, 1920; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1926.) 

Elinor Fuerst, M..\., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Christ 
Hospital School of Nursing, Jersey City, N. J., 1937; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1946; M.A., 1951.) 

RANGES C. Macgregor, M.A., Visiting Assistant Professor, Social Science. (A.B., Uni- 
versity of California, 1927; M.A., University of Missouri, 1947.) 

Audrey McCluskey, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing (Chronic Illness and 
Rehabilitation.) (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
3f Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1945; M.A., Columbia University, 1948.) 

M. Eva Poor, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing; Head 
?/ Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in Nursing, 
^Jew York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York University, 1950.) 

Edna Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of Operat- 
ng Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Pawtucket, R. I., 1933; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1949.) 



INSTRUCTORS 

VIildred Elizabeth Beisel, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Public Health Nursing. (Diploma 
n Nursing, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., New York 
University, 1944; M.A., 1946.) 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing; 
upervisor. Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Moses Tavlor 
hospital School of Nursing, Scran ton. Pa., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1945.) 

Jerniece Cr.\mer, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; 
Evening Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nurs- 
ng, Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, Hastings, Nebraska, 1944; 
A., Hastings College, Nebraska. 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1951; Nurse-Mid- 
dfery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1954.) 



42 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing, 
Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Constance Derrell, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Lincoln 
School of Nursing, New York, 1938; B.S., New York University, 1945; Midwifery 
Certificate, Tuskegee Institute, Ala., 1946; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1948.) 

Helma Fedder, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursijig; Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, ^Vashington University School of Nursing, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942; M.N., University of Washington, 1954.) 

Mary J. Foster, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1944; M.N., Yale University School of 
Nursing, 1947.) 

Lilian Henderson, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 1930; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas School of 
Nursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Sheila Hirshberg, M.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Recreation. (B.S., B.A., 
Kent State University, Ohio, 1950; M.S., Indiana University, 1953.) 

Elizabeth Hosford, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., Keuka College, 1947; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1952; Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, N. Y., 1953.) 

Vera R. Keane, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; Super- 
visor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Metropolitan 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1949; 
Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, 1951.) 

Emily J. Kroog, B.S., Instructor in Science. (B.S., New Jersey College for Women, 
1949.) 

Marie Kurihara, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1950; B.S., Cornell 
University, 1950.) 

Edna Elizabeth Lifgren, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Supervisor Sur- 
gical Nursing Sei-vice. (Diploma in Nursing, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 
1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1954.) 

Cynthia Mallory, B.A.. R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing. (B.A., Scarritt College, 
Nashville, Tenn., 1935; R.N., The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1946.) 



FACULTY 43 

Marie J. McIntvre, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Samaritan Hospital School 
of Nursing, Troy, N. Y. 1940; B.S., Syracuse University, 1950; M.S., 1952.) 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Johnston Hospital School 
of Nursing, Manila, P. I., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1934.) 

Marjorie Miller, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Science. (Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran 
Hospital School of Nursing, Cleveland; B.S., William J. Bryan University, Dayton, 
Tenn., 1949; M.S., Columbia University, 1954.) 

Eleanor Muhs, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Assistant Director, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of Nursing, 
Rochester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1954.) 

Wanda Robertson, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1945; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1945.) 

Sue Sabia, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Department Head, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1950.) 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St Michael's Hospital School of Nursing, 
Newark, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A., 1954.) 

Janet R. Sawyer, B.S., R.N., Instructor, Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1946; B.S., Cornell University, 1946.) 

Doris Schwartz, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, Compre- 
hensive Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, New York, 1942; B.S., New York University, 1953.) 

Laura L. Simms, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Administrative Assistant for 
^taff Education. (B.A., Texas State College for Women, Denton, Texas, 1940; Diploma 
n Nursing, Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas, 1945; M.Ed., Southern 
Methodist University, Dallas, Texas, 1950.) 

harlotte Stirling, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Vursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New England Hospital for ^V^omen and 
Children, Boston, Mass., 1940; B.S., Boston University, 1948; M.A., Columbia Uni- 

ersity, 1954.) 

-"lorence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
<ursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
lor\i City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

lthel M.\rie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing; Super- 
lisor. Pediatric Out-Patient Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind., 1944; Diploma 
n Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 



44 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Martha Van Arsdale, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; U.S., 
Cornell University, 1949.) 

Grace Wallace, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Xursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., University of California, San Francisco, 1942.) 

Jeanette Walters, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; As- 
sistant Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., New York Universitv, 
1944; M.A., 1949.) 

Mamie Wang, M.A., R.N., Instructor of Out-Patient Nursing; Supei-uisor, Out-Patient 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Peiping Medical College School of Nursing, 
Peiping, China, 1938; B.S., Yenching University, China, 1938; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1943.) 

Margie A. Warren, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Protestant Deaconess Hospital 
School of Nursing, Evansville, Ind., B.S. Indiana University, 1949.) 

Lucille Wright, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Science. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1915; B.S., University of Colorado, 1950; >LS.. 
Cornell University, 1955.) 



FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKr.EN Cattell, M.D. . . Professor of Pharmacology 

OsKAR DiETHELM, M.D. Professor of Psyckiatrj 

R. Gordon Douglas, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecolog\ 

Vincent du Vigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd. M.D Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D. Professor of Pediatrics 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D. Dean 

Walsh McDermott, M.D. . . Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Jamis NL Neill, Ph.D Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Robert F. Pitts, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Charles Berry, Ph.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D. . Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

\Valter Modell, M.D Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

Wilijfr Hagaman, M.D. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Dorothy Genhoff, Ph.D. Research Associate in Biochemistry 

.Issislant Professor in Biochemistry, School of Nursing 

David Anderson, Ph.D Instructor in Anatomy 

Martha J. MacLeod, ^L.\ Instructor in Physiology 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 

ASSISTANTS IN INSTRUCTION 

Marjorie H. Agnew, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1940; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1952.) 

Marie A. Anderson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Garfield Memorial Hospital School 
of Nursing, Washington, D.C., 1947; B.S., Hunter College, 1954.) 

Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor Medi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1931.) 

Theresa Christian, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Freedman Hospital School of Nursing, 
Washington, D.C., 1937; B.S., Loyola University, Chicago, 111., 1941; M.S., University 
of Chicago, 1947.) 

Phyllis Connor, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1946; B.S., 
McCoy College, Johns Hopkins University, 1953.) 

Jane D. Curtis, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (B.S., Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., 1939; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942.) 

Alice Marie DonDero, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital School of 
Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951.) 

Virginia Earles, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University, 1947; B.S., Syracuse University, 
1950; M.S., Syracuse University, 1954.) 

Carol C. Fripp, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. (B.S., Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C, 1944; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Meharry Medical College School of Nursing, Nashville, Tenn., 1948.) 

Helen H. Gilkey, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service (A.B., Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif., 1933; Diploma in 
Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1946; M.A., Sacramento 
State College, Sacramento, Calif., 1953.) 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1935.) 

Dorothy Jackson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Gynecological Nursing; Assistant Super- 
visor, Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue School of Nurs- 
ing, 1946; B.S., Hunter College, 1953.) 

45 



46 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Gladys Tyson Jones, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1951.) 

Claire Meyerowitz, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., Cornell University, 1945.) 

Mary Millar, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1954; B.S., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1954.) 

Jeanne Sherman, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing, Assistant Supervisor, Ob- 
stetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Skidmore College, 1947; B.S., Skidmore; 
College, 1947.) 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxtor 
Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Elizabeth Mary Simmons, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School of Nursing 
Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., 1952.) 

Marjorie a, Tait, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatrit 
Nursing Service. (B.S., Wayne University, Detroit, Mich., 1951.) 

Margaret Terry, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nursing' 
Supervisor, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, Notre Dame de Lourde I 
Hospital School of Nursing, Manchester, N.H., 1935; B.S., Boston University, 1948.1 

Florence Tritt, B.N., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nurs' 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Winnipeg General Hospital, 1940; B.N., McGill Uni' 
versity, 1951.) 

Jessie Weaver, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Niirsing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nun. 
ing Sendee. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 1924. 

Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psy\ 
chiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursinj' 
Waverly, Mass., 1933.) i 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 



47 



LECTURERS 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures 

Cornell University Medical College 



STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Vivian A. Ring, M.A., R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Helen V. Miller, R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N Night Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N Evening Administrative Assistant 

Dju Ing, M.S Relief Administrative Assistant 

I Elizabeth McKeown, R.N Assistant in Staff Education 

Dorothy Douyard, R.N. . Night Assistant Supervisor, Obstetric & Gynecologic Service 

Elaine Breen, B.S., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lois Cantrell, B.Ed., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lefa Rose, R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

iInez Mullins, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

iRuTH Nielsen, R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Maude David, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

^Ursula MacDonald, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

; Dorothy Ellison, B.A., R.N Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Lucy Hickey, R.N Supervisor, Private Operating Rooms 

Eloise Cooke, R.N Assistant Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Lydia H. Hansen, R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Dorothy Knapp, R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

jAnna Lyon, M.A., R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Jessie Macintosh, M.A., R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Francis Sheedy, R.N Assistant Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 



Bailey, Jane 
Blinn, Carolyn, B.S. 
Buehler, Meta, B.S. 



Berg, Helen, B.S. 
Bitting, Amy 
Cheroniak, Tillie 
ijCullington, Barbara 



HEAD NURSES 
MEDICINE 

Ibsen, Doris 
Lagerquist, Elaine, B.S. 

SURGERY 

Dieterle, Doris 
Lubowska, Nina 
Miller, Jeanne 
Pruchnik, Blanche 



Myers, Margaret, B.S. 
Thompson, Jean, B.S. 



Schaefer, Elizabeth, B.S. 
Thiele, Esther 
Tomasulo, Teresa 
Young, Eleanor 



1 



48 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Burley, Wanda 
Burnett, Dorothy 
Bosco, Antoinette, B.S. 
Collins, Margaret, B.S. 
Derr, Barbara 
Edmiindson, Ida 



OPERATING ROOM 

Eichwald, Bethea 
Farmer, Rosemary 
Frank, Mary 
Husted, Salome 
McMichael, Adele 
Mitchinson, Barbara 



Ondovchik, Anna, B.S. 
Rau, Rozalia, B.A. 
Rectanus, Dorothy 
Shaw, Martha 
Sulette, Mary, B.S. 
Vella, Mary 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Bott, Alma 

Calder, Elizabeth, M.A. 
Calnero, Ann 
Colwell, Anna 
Conner, Agnes 
Hammond, Grace 



Heard, Mary 
Jackson, Martha 
Kirk, Mary, B.S. 
Laird, Elizabeth, B.S. 
Leonardo, Yolanda 



Lovette, Virginia 
Mathews, Thelma 
Matus, Veronica 
Monahan, Gloria 
Young, Kathleen 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



Carman, Edna 

Clark, Evelyn 

Connolly, Kathleen, B.S. 

Evans, Alberta 

Foley, Alice 



Hines, Marilyn 
Lambert, Lucille 
Liddle, Evelyn 
Maroshek, Helene, B.S. 
Nelson, Virginia, M.S. 



Ricci, Claire 
Shida, Alice 
Sweeney, Claire, B.S. 
Wagner, Carolyn 



Canty, Mary, B.S. 
Clark, Mary 
Gerchak, Helen 



PRIVATE PATIENTS 

Kozitsky, Mary 
McKeown, Ann, B.S. 
Morgan, Agnes 



Reynolds, Mary 
Slater, Amy 
Smith, Anne 



Bertagna, Elda 
Dial, Hazel 



Eisler, Vivian 
Genereux, Joanne 
Janes, Carl 



PEDIATRICS 

Gallo, Louise 



Zemlock, Margaret, B.A. 



PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 



McKee, Beatrice 
Morrison, Esther 
Pitt, Marguerite 



Puzzo, Emma 
Seiler, Elizabeth, B.S. 
Ulatowski, Amelia 



NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Louise Stephenson, M.S., Director 



Susan Dunbar, B.S. 
Susan Foresman, B.S. 
Donna Hovet, B.S. 
Ann Hurevitz, M.A. 
Catherine Kellerman, B.S. 



Mavis McLaran, M.S. 
Susan Paige, B.S. 
Virginia Pearson Snyder, B.S. 
Carol Sullivan, B.S. 
Margaret Wylie, B.S. 



. 



ASSOCIATED ^VITH THE FACULTY 49 

OCCUPATIONAL AND RECREATIONAL THERAPY 

Claire Glasser, B.S., O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Main Hospital 

Mildred Spargo, O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Psychiatry 

Grace C. Newberg, B.A Director, Recreational Therapy, Psychiatry 

MuHi Yasu.mlra, M.A., O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Pediatrics 

Charlotte Weiss, O.T.R Occupational Therapist, Pediatrics 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel, A.B Director, The Lying-in Hospital 

Elizabeth F. Heavitt^ M.A Chief Social Worker, Payne Whitney Clinic 

Mrs. K. WiCKMAX, M.S Psychiatric Social Worker, Pediatrics 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Mari.\n R.\ndall, B.S., R.N Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Service of New York 

Eleanor \V. Mole, B.S Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 

Mary E. Parker, M.S., R.N Director, Bureau of Public Health Nursing, 

and Staff New York State Department of Health 



j NURSERY SCHOOLS 

Mrs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Director, Bank Street Nursery School 

Mrs. "Wilhelmina Kr.\ber .... Director, Downtown Community Nursery School 

Mrs. Dorothy Cleverdon Teacher-Education, Summer Play Schools 

Mrs. Ele.\nor Blumg.\rt, M.A. Director of Nursery Schools, Department of Pediatrics 



HOSPITAL FOR SPECIAL SURGERY 
kfARY Jeanne Clapp, M.N Director of Nursini 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOLt 



Name Year Address College 

Anderson Anne Denisevich '55 Bridgeport, Conn. Carleton College 

Andrews, Nancy '57 Carlstadt, N. J. Springfield College 

Ashdown, Jean '57 Coral Gables, Fla. Douglass College* 

Barton, Priscilla W '55 West Roxbury, Mass. Cornell University 

Becker, Judy E. '57 Mount Vernon, N. Y. University of Vermont 

Beeler, Paulene A. '56 Fort Wayne, Ind. Indiana University 

Berenstrauch, Helen '57 New York, N. Y. Hunter College 

Berkson, Gail '56 Bayside, L. I., N. Y. St. Lawrence University 

Bernhardt, Ruth '56 Yeadon, Pa. Temple University 

Bickford, Deborah A. '56 Pelham, N. Y. Bradford Jr. College 

Birchenall, Joan '56 Morrisville, Pa. St. Mary's College 

Bliss, Shirley '55 Bloomfield, N. J. Swarthmore College 

Bloch, Steffi Goldsmith .... '55 Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Russell Sage College 

Bloch, Ursula M. '56 Larchmont, N. Y. Cedar Crest College 

Bolton, Barbara '56 Arlington, Mass. Simmons College 

Borden, Jean '57 Westlake, Ohio Maryville College 

Borst, Evelyn '57 Brooktondale, N. Y. Green Mountain Jr. 

College 

Bowman, Joann P. '57 Douglaston, L. I., N. Y. University of Kansas 

Brink, Nancy M. '57 Dunmore, Pa. Houghton College 

Brown, Mary D. '56 Port Chester, N. Y. New York University 

Bruns, Marjorie R. '56 St. Thomas, V. I. Hope College 

Bruns, Marlene D. '56 St. Thomas, V. I. Hope College 

Buckland, Katharine S. .... '55 Minneapolis, Minn. Smith College 

Buckley, Irene '56 Bronx, N. Y. Hunter College 

Burke, Sarah J. '57 Mahanoy City, Pa. Hood College 

Buttrick, Anne '56 Concord, Mass. Mt. Holyoke College 

Cain, Ellen A. '57 Holyoke, Mass. University of Mass. 

Calnero, Barbara '57 Utica, N. Y. Utica College 

Campion, Muriel '56 Bristol, Pa. Temple University 

Carmody, Irene L. '55 'Westfield, N. J. Douglass College* 

Carruth, Marybelle '56 Little Neck, L. I., N. Y. Bates College 

Casalini, Yohanna '57 Long Island City, N. Y. Hunter College 

Gasman, Sandra '57 Pelham, N. Y. Swarthmore College 

Cavaro, Carmela M. '55 Caracas, Venezuela Mt. St. Vincent College 

Chamberlin, Priscilla R. . . '57 Croton Falls, N. Y. Colby College 

Cinquemani, Grace '56 St. Albans, L. I., N. Y. Queens College 

Clegg, Frances M. '55 Bellerose, L. L, N. Y. Queens College 

Collett, Ann M. '55 Buffalo, N. Y. Hunter College 

Condello, Justine R. '55 Great Neck, L. I., N. Y. Chestnut Hill College 

Cooley, Harriet '56 Pleasantville. N. Y. Simmons College 

Cornell, Carol '56 Endicott, N. Y. West Virginia Wesleyan 

College 

Costantin, Geralyn '57 Clifton, N. J. Centenary Jr. College 

Cramer, Ruth '57 Maspeth, L. I., N. Y. Concordia Jr. College 

t Including those giaduating in September, 1955, but not those entering at that tira 
* Douglass College was formerly called New Jersey College for Women. 

50 



STUDEMS IX THE SCHOOL 



Curtis, Anna M. '57 

Daggett, Sue '57 

Dalby, Nancy J. '55 

Dannaker, Claire '56 

Deardorir, Jane E. '55 

Dehan, Elaine '56 

Delle Donne, Marie T. . '55 

DeLucia, Louise '56 

Denis, Shelby AL '57 

Dewey, Barbara K. '55 

Douglas, Jane B. '55 

Duane, Marilyn G. '55 

Dudley, Priscilla A. '56 

Dudley, Virginia '56 

Duerr, Joan '57 

Durkin, Mary Lu *56 

Earle, Alice '57 

Edgar, Joyce E. '57 

Finn, Patricia '56 

fitzgerald, Susan '55 

Frost, Betty J. '57 

Funk, Elizabeth A. '55 

Gordon, Carolee '57 

trover, Margaret '55 

Sruenewald, Barbara '56 

Hlaight, Barbara '56 

I'riall, Gail '57 

Hamilton, Shirley M. '56 

IHlappich, Elizabeth '56 

Harris, Joyce Steiner '55 

Hlayes, Joan '57 

i^eaney, Mary C. '55 

ieggie, Anne T. '57 

ienry, Elspeth '57 

ienry, Grace-Marie '55 

■lildreth, Joan L. '57 

iippensteel, Patricia '57 

iitchcock, Katherine '57 

iogan, Carol '57 

iohloch, Faith J. '56 

iood, Ann K. '55 

iorn. Norma '56 

■lorton, Johanna E. '56 

ioward, >Liry L. '56 

" iusbands, Irma L. '55 

lutt, Dorothv '57 

lutt, Esther F. '55 

lutzelman. Patricia Gold . '55 

i^iluxster, Marilyn R. '55 



Telford, Pa. 

University Heights, Ohio 
Marlboro, N. Y. 
Broomall, Pa. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Little Neck, L. I., N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Springfield, N. J. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Asbury Park, N. J. 
Lyons, N. Y. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Montclair, N. J. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Hempstead, L. I., N. Y. 
Salamanca, N. Y. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Pennsbiug, Pa. 
Cheshire, Conn. 
Afton, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Floral Park, N. Y'. 
Maplewood, N. J. 
Menlo Park, N. J. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
Springfield Gardens, 
L. I., N. Y. 
Glen Head, N. Y. 
Linden, N. J. 
Chatham, N. J. 
Pottsville, Pa. 
Shippensbtirg. Pa. 
\Vhite Plains, N. Y. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Rockville Centre, 
L. I., N. Y. 
Medford, Mass. 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 
Clifford, Pa. 
New Orleans, La. 
Boston, Mass. 
^Vatertown, N. V. 
'Watertown, N. Y. 
Oceanside, N. Y. 
Kenvil, N. J. 



Houghton College 
Carleton College 
Cornell University 
Gettysburg College 
Gettysburg College 
CioUege of New Rocfielle 
St. John's University 
City College 

Mary Washington College 
Cornell University 
Colby College 
Ohio Wesleyan University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Keuka College 
Chestnut Hill College 
Colby College 
Cornell University 
Hofstra College 
Elmira College 
Bradford Jr. College 
Penn. State University 
Skidmore College 
Cornell University 
Brooklyn College 
Cornell University 
Notre Dame College 
Mary ^Yashington College 
Ohio University 
Douglass College* 
Springfield College 

St. John's University 
Adelphi College 
Douglass College* 
St. Elizabeth College 
Hood College 
Houghton College 
De Pauw University 
Hunter College 

University of Maine 
University of Mass. 
Cornell University 
Penn. State University 
Tulane University 
New York University 
Roberts ^Vesleyan College 
Roberts Wesleyan College 
St. Lawrence University 
Bticknell Univcrsitv 



• Douglass College was formerly called New Jersey College for ^Vomen. 



52 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Iley, Jan '56 

Ingley, Margaret B. '57 

Ives, Judith A. '56 

Jackson, Elizabeth C. '57 

Johnson, Paula J. '56 

Kane, Patricia M, '55 

Kelly, Noreen A. '57 

Kerstetter, Jean C. '55 

Ketterer, Doris '55 

King, Karen '57 

King, Mary Anna '55 

Knowlton, Jane '55 

Kolowsky, Madeleine 

Erickson '55 

Lament, Jane '57 

Leidenberg, Norma J. '56 

Leland, Joan '57 

Levinsky, Sandra '57 

Lewis, Joan C. '55 

Light, Frances '56 

Loizeaux, Margaret Ennis . '55 

Long, Diane M. '57 

Lord, Rae '56 

Lowry, Lois White '55 

Luciano, Dolores A. '57 

Lyman, Carol '57 

Mager, Flelen M. '56 

Manning, Marilyn '56 

Mansell, Ellen . '55 

Marshall, Mary L '55 

McConaughy, Lillian C. . . . '56 
McEldowney, Margaret R. . '56 
McMaster, Charmaine J. . . '57 

Meaden, Georgia E. '56 

Messmer, Barbara '56 

Meyer, Dorothy E. '55 

Miller, Sandra' '57 

Mitchell, Elizabeth '55 

Mitchell, Geraldine F. .... '55 

Mullin, Colleen A. '55 

Mulhn, Magdalene '57 

Muirhead, Margaret '57 

Murphy, Mary Ford '55 

Murtha, Nancy J. '56 

Nagengast, Rosina A. '55 

Nash, Carol H. '55 

Nash, Jean C. '55 

Noll, Carol M. '55 

North, Helen Allhusen .... '55 

Oehrlein, Marianne '56 

Packer, Barbara J. '55 



Dunedin, Fla. 
Port Washington, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
Memphis, Tennessee 
New York, N. Y. 
Brewer, Maine 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rye, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Greenwood, Mass. 
Greenville, Maine 

Dunellen, N. J. 
Allentown, Pa. 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Florence, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Bethesda, Md. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Endicott, N. Y. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Linden, N. J. 
Allentown, Pa. 
Stoddard, N. H. 
Wellsville, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Lake George, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
Ardmore, Pa. 
Bronxville, N. Y. 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Manhasset, L. I., N. Y. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Woodside, N. Y. 

Delmar, N. Y. 

North Waterford, Maine 

Bronxville, N. Y. 

Amityville, L. I., N. Y. 

Merion, Pa. 

Hayden, Ariz. 

East Lansing, Mich. 

Verona, N. J. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

New York, N. Y. 



Rollins College 
Bates College 
Albion College 
De Pauw University 
Vanderbilt University 
Marymount College 
University of Maine 
Gettysburg College 
Gettysburg College 
Cornell University 
Douglass College* 
University of Maine 

Houghton College 
Penn. State University 
Gettysburg College 
University of Mass. 
Brooklyn College 
New York University 
Hershey Jr. College 
Douglass College* 
Tulane University 
St. Lawrence University 
Hood College 
Keuka College 
Cornell University 
Douglass College* 
Cedar Crest College 
University of New Hamsp^jjj 
Cornell University 
Wheaton College 
Bennett Jr. College 
Brooklyn College 
Stephens College 
Rosemont College 
Concordia Collegiate Ins^ 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Harpur College 
St. Joseph's College for 

Women 
Cornell University 
St. Lawrence University 
College of New Rochelle 
Hofstra College 
Duke University 
University of Kentucky 
Michigan State College 
Elmira College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 



Iiiai 

hid: 

ki 
h 
k 

%l 
'ft: 
be: 

%. 

IC, 



* Douglass College was formerly called New Jersey College for Women. 



STUDENTS IN 1 HE SCHOOL 



53 



attcrson, Anne K. '56 Columbus, Ohio 

eeling, Elizabeth L. '55 Rosellc, N. J. 

etioff, Frances L. '57 Tovvaco, N. J. 

hillips, Nancy A. '57 Ingalls, North Carolina 



otter, Patricia A '55 

urinton, Jane '55 

[uiglcy, Jean '57 

amage, Elaine '56 

.ees, Marjorie A. '55 

ichards, Gloria A. '57 

ingen, Lucille A. '55 

oehner, Owen '56 

ogge, Renee '57 

othe, Barbara A. '57 

udolph, Patricia '57 

usk, Jane '55 

usk, Mary A. '57 

idenwater, Susan A '55 

:haefer, Anna-Maria '56 

Jiaffner, Jeanne E. '55 

:heer, Anne '57 

:hlosser, Adele P. '57 

hmid, Rose-Marie '56 

;hmidt, Joan A. '55 

:hult, Julia M. '55 

lekamp, Lois J. '55 

law, Janet '56 

lields, Margaret '56 

ligo, EHzabeth A. '57 

lowacre, Mary A. '55 

egle, Margaret L '55 

)alteholz, Clara M. '56 

oop, Nancy J. '57 

Iraumanis, Mara '56 

.ggart, Eleanor '57 

akaki, Joyce F. '55 

uber, Lenore '57 

aylor, Althea '55 

aylor, Edith '56 

erriberry, Joy '55 

hompson, Polly 

Remington '56 

ng, Emily '57 

)shach, Susan '55 

rever, Elizabeth S. '55 

riebe, Christine B. '56 

ikelbach, Joan '56 

quhart, Audrey L. '56 

n Geldern, Margaret .... '56 

arren. Delight '57 

einrich, Jean '57 



Dover, N. H. 
Needham Heights, Mass. 
Northport, N. Y. 
Linden, N. J. 
Nanticoke, Pa. 
East Orange, N. J. 
West Orange, N. J. 
Mount Vernon, N. V. 
Hicksville, L. I., N. Y. 
Pelhara Manor, N. Y. 
Floral Park, N. Y. 
Marlboro, N. Y. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
Hempstead, L. I., N. Y. 
Oyster Bay, L. I., N. Y. 
Hershey, Pa. 
New Canaan, Conn. 
New York, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Lewisburg, Pa. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Queens Village, N. Y. 
Wayne, Pa. 
Gloversville, N. Y. 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Cambria Heights, N. Y. 
Newark, N. Y. 
Queens Village, N. Y. 
Rolla, Mo. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Waverly, N. Y. 
Waverly, N. Y. 
New Canaan, Conn. 

Gladwyne, Pa. 
Shanghai, China 
Saginaw, Michigan 
Arlington, Va. 
Kingsport, Tenn. 
Mattituck, L. I.. N. Y. 
East Walpole, Mass. 
Chatham, N. J. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Floral Park, N. Y. 



University of Michigan 
Gettysburg College 
Drew University 
Woman's College ot 

North Carolina 
Colby College 
Bates College 
Hofstra College 
Keuka College 
Buckncll University 
Upsala College 
Cornell University 
St. Lawrence University 
Hofstra College 
Wells College 
Hofstra College 
Cornell University 
Denison University 
Hofstra College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Hershey Jr. College 
Colby College 
Vassar College 
Cornell University 
Bucknell University 
Upsala College 
Denison University 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
Upsala College 
Cornell University 
Queens College 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Cornell University 
Cottey Jr. College 
Queens College 
Hunter College 
Adelphi College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Colby Jr. College 

Cornell University 
Bradley University 
University of Michigan 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
University of Mass. 
Drew University 
Cornell University 
Hofstra College 



* Douglass College was formerly called New Jersey College for Women. 



54 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Weikheiser, Viima '57 Easton, Pa. Cedar Crest College 

White, Evelyn Boylan '55 Brooklyn, N, Y. Packer Collegiate Inst. 

Whittle, Natalie J. '55 Hershey, Pa. Hershey Jr. College 

Wilmarth, Jeanne E, '57 Bayville, N. Y. Cornell University 

^Vinfield, Delia M. '55 Englewood, N. J. Bticknell University 

Woods, Angela L. '57 Bloomfield, N. J. College of St. Elizabeth 

W^orm, Ruth '55 Scotia, N. Y. Cornell University 

VVosniok, Theodora '56 Rye, N. Y. Douglass College* 

Wygant, Mary L. '55 Marlboro, N. Y. Peace College 

Yegen, Laurie '57 Teaneck, N. J. Cornell University 

Zettle, Shirlee A. '56 Emmaus, Pa. Cedar Crest College 

Zvirblis, Violet '55 Brooklyn, N. Y. New York University 

* Dotiglass College was formerly called New Jersey College for Women. 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the School 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning the f 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible backgroun J 
preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 



Miss Virginia ^L Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Ninsing 

1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information whi( 
will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing scho 
entrance. 



Name . 
Address 



Date 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 



Date diploma received or exjDCcted 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of colle. 

19. 

Please send me an application blank ■[> 

(See page 12 regarding wheji to request and check if desired.) 



INDEX 



Absences, 15 

Accreditation of the School, 5 

Activities, 16; Nurses Residence, 10; 
Alumnae Association, 18; recreation, 
16; marriage and residence, 17; school 
government, 17; counseling services, 
18 

Activities and Relationships within the 
hospital unit, 23, 32 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
37-49 

Admission, 10; general requirements, 
10; selection of a college. 10; educa- 
tion requirements, 11; age and health, 
12; application, 12; Cornell advisory 
committee on pre-nursing, 39 

Advanced standing. 14 

Aim and Philosophy of school, 5 

\lumnae Association, 18, 39; Irene Sut- 
lifFe Fund, 27 

\natomy, 20, 29 

Application for admission, 12, 54 

Assistant professors, 41 

Assistants in instruction. 45-46 
Delate professors, 40 

Associated with the faculty, 45-49 

iasic nursing progiam. 19; professional 

curriculum, 19 
iiochemistry, 20, 29 
iiological and physical sciences, 29 

];alendar, 3 

^Ihronic Illness (and Rehabilitation), 22, 
32 

ilinical Nursing, Introduction to, 20, 32 

::iinics, 8-9 

::ollege. Selection of, 10 

Committee for Scholarships, 27. 39 

immunity and the nurse, 20, 29 

Contents, 2 

>ore Course in Operating Room, Surgi- 
cal and Out-Patient Nursing, 21, 34 



Cornell University, 6; degree, 14; ad- 
visory committee on pre-nursing stu- 
dents, 39; Medical College faculty, 
44 
Council of the School, 37 
Counseling services, 18 
Courses, description of, 29-36 
Curriculum, professional, 19; Unit I, 
20; Unit II. 20; Unit III, 22; Unit IV, 
23 

Degree, 14 

Description of courses, 29-36 

Development of Behavior in Children, 
24, 36 

Diet Therapy, 21,22. 33 

Diploma. 14 

Division of Child Development, Depart- 
ment of Pediatrics, 22, 49 

Early growth and development. 20, 29 
Educational requisites, 1 1 
Elective Experience, 23, 32 
Emeritus professors, 40 
Executive faculty, 38 
Expenses, 24 

Facilities for instruction. 8-10 

Faculty, 40-44, associated with, 45-49, 
committees of, 38 

Faculty instructors, 41-44 

Family and Community Health, 22, 30 

Fees and expenses, 24, method of pay- 
ment, 25, maintenance, 26 

Financial aid, 27-28 

Fundamentals of Nmsing and allied 
courses, 20, 31; Orientation. 31 

Graduation, 13. 14; advanced standing, 
14; degree and diploma, 14 

Gynecology, care of Gynecologic (Pri- 
vate) Patients, 23. 35 

Head nurses, 47^8 
Health service, 15 
Historv of School, 6-7 



56 



INDEX 



Historical Backgrounds of Nursing, 21, 
30 

Introduction to Clinical Nursing, 20, 32 

Joint Administrati\'e Board, 37 

Lecturers, 47 
Libraries, 8 
Loan Fund, 27 

Maintenance, 26 

Marriage, 17 

Maternity Nursing, 21, 35 

Mathematics related to drugs, 20, 31 

Medical Nursing, 21, 33 

Microbiology, 20, 29 

New York Hospital, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; nursing 
supervisors, 47; head nurses, 47, 48; 
staff, 47, 48, 49 

Nurses Residence, 8, 16 

Nursing, Fundamentals of— and allied 
courses, 20, 31 

Nutrition, 20; department of, 48; Nu- 
trition and Diet Therapy, 33 

Obstetric (Maternity) Nursing, 21, 35 
Officers of administration, 38 
Operating Room Nursing, 21, 35; Core 

Course, 21, 34 
Orientation, 20, 31 
Orthopedic Nursing, 23, 34 
Out-Patient Department, 9, 21 
Out-Patient Nursing, 21, 31; Core 

Course, 21, 34 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 9, 48 

Pediatric Nursing, 22, 36 

Pharmacology, 21, 32 

Physical Education, 20, 21, 22, 36 

Physiology, 20, 29 

Private Patient Nursing, 23, 34 



Professional Problems I, 20, 30; Profes- 
sional Problems II, 23, 30 

Professors, 40 

Program, basic nursing, 19 

Promotion and graduation, 13-14; Ad- 
vanced standing. Degree, Diploma, 14 1 

Psychiatric Nursing, 22, 36 

Psychosocial and cultural aspects of nur- 
sing, 20, 29 

Public health affiliations, 10, 22, 49 

Public Health Nursing, 10, 22, 30 

Recreational facilities, 16 

Registration, State, 5 

Rehabilitation, Practice of Nursing in, 

22, 32; see also Orthopedic, 23, 34 
Residence and marriage, 17 

Scholarships, 27-28 

School government, 17 

School of Nursing, administrative of-] 

ficers, 38; faculty committees, 38 
Senior Experience, 23, 32 
Social Sciences, 29 
Social Service Departments, 49 
State registration, 5 
Student life and activities, 16-18 
Students now in School, 50-54 
Supervisors, nursing, 47 
Surgical Nursing, 21, 34; Core Course, 

21, 34 

Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuition, 24 

Uniforms, 24; see also Maintenance, 26| 
Urological Nursing, 22, 34 

Vacations, 15 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York, 1( 

22, 49 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1956-1957 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY- NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



TERM DATES 1956-1957 

Sept. 24, 1956 -Dec. 16,1956 

Dec. 17, 1956 - March 10, 1957 

March 11, 1957 - June 2, 1957 

June 3, 1957 - Sept. 22, 1957 

Sept. 23, 1957 - Dec. 15, 1957 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of New 
York. It is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, 
which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from York 
Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is in the Nurses Residence at the corner of York 
Avenue and 70th Street. 

The 65th Street crosstown bus, M-7, east-bound, runs to York 
Avenue and 70th Street. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two weeks 
throughout the calendar year. Volume 48. Number 3. July 30, 1956. 
Second-class mail privileges authorized at the post office at Ithaca, 
New York, December 14, 1916, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

A list of the Announcements will be found on the inside back cover. 



Cornell University -New York Hospital 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1956-1957 

1320 YORK AVENUE, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 



Calendar 3 

The Preparation of Today's Professional Nurse . . 4 

Accreditation 5 

State Registration for Graduates 5 

History 6 

Facilities for Instruction 8 

Admission 10 

Promotion and Graduation 14 

Health Service 15 

Vacations and Absences 16 

Student Life and Activities 16 

Basic Nursing Program 19 

Fees and Expenses 24 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 26 

Description of Courses 29 

Administration 36 

Faculty 39 

Associated with the Faculty 44 

Students in the School 49 

Index 55 



Sept. 20 Thursday 
Sept. 22 Saturday 
Oct. 12 Friday 



k 



ov. 22 Thursday 

Nov, 23 Friday 

Dec. 22 Saturday 

Dec. 25 Tuesday 

Ian. 1 Tuesday 



peb. 
Klay 
une 
July 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



22 Friday 
vSO Thursday 

4 Thursday 
2 Monday 
21 Saturday 
11 Friday 
21 Thursday 

24 Tuesday 

25 Wednesday 



CALENDAR 

1956 

Commencement Day 

Registration Day 

Holiday: Columbus Day (for all students except 
P'reshmen) * 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Holiday: Freshmen only* 

Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1957 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

and last day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

Holiday: Washington's Birthday 

Holiday: Memorial Day 

Commencement Day 

Holiday: Independence Day 

Holiday: Labor Day 

Registration Day 

Holiday for Columbus Day 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas recess for Freshmen students begins 

Holiday: Christmas Day 



1958 

Jan. 1 Wednesday Holiday: New Year's Day 

and last day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

Feb. 21 Friday Holiday for Washington's Birthday 

May 30 Friday Holiday: Memorial Day 



July 4 Friday 



Holiday: Independence Day 



* Freshmen will receive this hoHday on Friday, Nov. 23, 1956. 



THE PREPARATION OF TODAY'S 
PROFESSIONAL NURSE 

Professional Nursing is continually growing and expanding in its' 
efforts to bring better service to more people. The broadening concepfj 
of health care which includes the maintenance of health, the prevention 
of illness and the fullest possible rehabilitation of all patients, has 
brought with it, not only the need for more nurses, but for better quali 
fied practitioners. Nursing is an important part of all care in hospitals 
and is also reaching people in homes, factories, schools, offices, clinics 
The recipients of these services include people in all stages of health 
and in all age gioups. 

The scope of activity of the modern nurse also increases as the bounda 
ries of knowledge are pushed back in the field of health. To qualify foi 
professional practice today requires a gieat deal more than skill in tech 
niques, for the nurse is constantly called upon to exercise judgmeni 
based on expert knowledge and understanding, to identify nursim 
problems and to decide upon a course of nursing action. Physical anc 
mental illness is often caused by conditions in the home, on the job oi 
in the community. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse understanc 
personal relationships, the role of the family, the process of growth anc 
development and community organization for meeting health needs 
Her education must provide her with a sound foundation not only ii 
the social and biological sciences, but also in the humanities. 

It is important for the nurse herself to be physically well and emotion 
ally mature. She needs to possess skill as a teacher and her instruction 
will encompass not only her patients and their families, but non-pro 
fessional co-workers such as the practical nurse and nurse's aide. To th 
extent that she can give leadership in these relationships, nursing care i 
substantially increased in both quantity and quality. ] 

It is the aim of the School to provide those experiences which wil' 
help the student grow into the kind of person who can work well wit! 
other people, can exercise judgment and implement her decisions in th 
practice of nursing; who will be motivated to make her maximum con 
tribution both as a citizen and a nurse, and will be aware of the necej 
sity for continuing study and investigation to help meet the changin 
health needs of society as they evolve. 

As a student she will participate in group planning with other pract 
tioners in the health field in order to gain an appreciation of the mear 
ing and importance of comprehensive care. She will be introduced to th 
principles underlying effective leadership and function in a guidin 



STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 5 

apacity to less skilled workers who are included in the nursing "team." 
Immediately upon completion of the program, the graduate should 
>e prepared to contribute effectively in beginning positions in hospitals, 
mblic health agencies and in the many other situations where cap- 
.ble nursing service is needed. After a reasonable period of this kind of 
xperience she should be capable of providing leadership over a wide 
ange of coordinated activities in such positions as that of the hospital 
iead Nurse or the Senior Staff Nurse and Senior Advisor in a Public 
lealth Agency. Her basic program has been planned to provide a sound 
oundation for advanced study leading to increasing responsiblities in 
uch fields as teaching, administration, research and writing. 



ACCREDITATION 

^^'^ j The School is accredited by the Accrediting Service of the National 
™; -.eague for Nursing as one of a small number of collegiate schools 



™ vhich prepares students for professional practice in public health 
^"' lursing as well as for practice in hospitals and in other fields of nursing. 
^"' The School is a member of the Department of Baccalaureate and Higher 
''^" pegiee Programs of the National League for Nursing and meets the re- 

''"' juirements of the New York State Department of Education. 

d I 

„ STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 

Graduates who are citizens or who have legally declared intention of 
oil pecoming citizens are eligible for admission to the examination for licen- 
aie ^ure administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are ex- 

bected to take the first examination given after completion of the nursing 
iiii course. Satisfactory completion of this examination classifies the graduate 
n pf the School as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in the State of New York. If 

:itizenship is not completed within seven years from the declaration 

Df intention, state licensure is revoked. 
The New York State Nurse Practice Act states that a nurse must be 

licensed by examination in the state in which she was graduated. For 

,this reason, graduates of this School are urged to take State Board ex- 
laminations in New York State rather than in another state as they may 
Iwish to practice in New York State at a future date. Graduates wishing 
toll jto practice elsewhere may apply for registration either by reciprocity or 
lidii |by examination, depending on the laws of the particular state. 



HISTORY 

The Cornell University— New York Hospital School of Nursing Wc 
established as a School in Cornell University in 1942, on the 65th ai 
niversary of the founding of The New York Hospital School of Nursing 
one of the earliest nursing schools in the country. The School is part c ' 
The New York Hospital— Cornell Medical Center which includes als 
the Cornell University Medical College and the various adjoining buik 
ings of The New York Hospital, extending from 68th to 71st Street o 
the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society of the New Yor 
Hospital and Cornell University, committed to a four-fold purpose i 

(1) care of the sick, providing the same wisdom and skill to rich and pooi 

(2) education of doctors and nurses, research workers, technicians an' 
others who will work in the field of medical science; (3) research to e> 
tend the boundaries of knowledge in the health fields; (4) promotion c 
public health through the development of preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second oldest voluntary hospital in thi 
country, its Royal Charter having been granted in 1771, in the reign o 
King George HI. The first patients were soldiers wounded in the Revoh 
tionary War. At that time the Hospital was located on the lower end o 
Manhattan, the only part of the City then settled, and on early maps th 
location was designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Early in its history the Hospital pioneered in introducing vaccinatioi ^ 
for smallpox for the first time in America, in introducing temperatur 
charts now standard practice in hospitals, in the use of anesthetics, am 
in caring for the mentally ill as sick persons needing medical care rathe 
than as outcasts fit only for prison or the almshouse. Today the Cente 
continues to pioneer in significant new programs including studies ii 
psychosomatic medicine, in planning for and teaching comprehensive' 
medical care, research to ascertain the causes of alcoholism, establish^ 
ment of an ambulatory transfusion clinic, and in bringing rehabilitatior 
into all medical care. 

Cornell University with its campus in Ithaca, New York, received it 
charter in 1865, nearly 100 years after the Hospital had been chartered 

Three circumstances contributed to the founding of the University ir 
the eventful years that marked the close of the Civil War. In the firs 
place, Ezra Cornell, a citizen of Ithaca, had come into a large fortun( 
from his holdings in the newly formed Western Union Telegraph Com 
pany and had devoted a great deal of thought to the good that might b( 



HISTORY OF SCHOOL 7 

done by giving his wealth to education. A second circumstance was the 
fact that the State of New York had received a substantial land grant, 

finder the Morrill Act of 1862, for the support of colleges teaching 
griculture and the mechanical arts. The third circumstance was that 
^Mr. Cornell had as a colleague in the state legislature of 1864-1865 a 
[i young senator named Andrew D. White, later to become the first presi- 
,1 dent of the University, who had the vision of preserving the state's land 
jl grant intact for a single great institution which should teach not only 
jagriculture and the mechanical arts but the humanities and the sciences 
as well. 

The Medical College and the School of Nursing are the two schools 
■ d£ the University which are located in New York City. 
. The Hospital had been operating for over 100 years before a school 
j:or the training of nurses was opened. There had been early steps taken, 
jtiowever, to improve the care given to patients and even in 1799, Dr. 
Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician had organized a 
series of lectures combined with a course of practical instruction in the 
ards which was given to the women who were engaged by the Hospital 
t that time as "watchers" and "nurses." Although the theoretical con- 
ent was meager and the practical instruction not systematically planned, 
j ihese classes focused attention on the fact that women who had some 
J preparation for their work gave better care than those without instruc- 
tion. When in 1873 the first training school in this country on the 
I iVightingale pattern was opened at Bellevue Hospital, the Governors 
jpf The Society of the New York Hospital contributed to its support. 
I ?'our years later, in 1877, when the Hospital moved to new buildings, 
The New York Hospital Training School for Nurses was opened in 
quarters which were considered to have all the modern improvements of 
he times. The School moved to the present location when the present 
Medical Center was opened in 1932. 

The health needs of the community and country have been the guid- 
ng force in the development of the School which has strengthened its 
)rogram to keep pace with these needs. Today the work of the profes- 
ional nurse requires a great deal more of her than in the past and in 
ecognition of this, the University program was established in 1942. 
ince 1946, all students admitted to the School have been in the degree 
)rogram and the School is now one of the largest collegiate schools of 
lursing in the country. An endowment fund for the School As'as begun 
n 1951 which as it grows will further safeguard the progress of the 
chool for future development. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the Nursin : 
School. These include class and conference rooms, libraries, laboratorit i 
and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching unit on the secon I 
and ninth floors of the Nurses Residence while others are provided i : 
The New York Hospital, the Hospital for Special Surgery and in th 
Cornell University Medical College. 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all th: 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various agencies of th ■ 
cit\' and the surrounding: communitv. 



LIBRARIES 

The library of the School contains a wide selection of materials pel 
tinent to nursing and related fields, and includes important medica 
and nursing periodicals, both current and in reference sets of bounc 
vohunes. There are additional small collections in each department nea 
the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors. The library i. 
under the direction of a committee of the faculty, and in charge of ; 
professional librarian. The facilities of the Medical College Library an 
also readily accessible and make valuable supplementary materials avail 
able to both the students and faculty of the Nursing School. In addition 
the broad resources of the New York Public Library, the National Healtl 
Library, and many other special libraries in the city may be called upor 
•whenever needed. 

CLINICAL SERVICES 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital and the Hospita 
for Special Surgery (Orthopedic) provide unusual opportunity for th( 
care and study of patients. The New York Hospital is comprised of five 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided 
not only Avith facilities adequate in every way for the care of both in 
patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching and foi 
the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized clinical serv- 
ices are therefore available which are seldom found within a single 
organization. The Hospital has a capacity of 1,200 beds and during the 
past year 29,545 patients were hospitalized and 42,982 were admitted as 
out-patients. The conduct of research in all clinical departments gives 
the student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the 
part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects. 
Authenticity of the findings in many studies depends to no small degiee 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 9 

on the accuracy witli ^vliicli the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to general 
medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of 
tuberculosis, neurology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and throat 
disorders, plastic and neuro-surgery, ophthalmology, and a fracture 
service. The Lying-in Hospital has a capacity of 206 adults and 102 new- 
borns and pro\ides lor obstetric and gynecologic patients. Each year 
approximately 4,000 babies are born in this Hospital. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 96 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. Facili- 
ties for the recreation of convalescent children and the services of an 
occupational therapist offer opportunities for the nursing student to 
study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick chil- 
dren. All students have Nursery School experience. Here the student 
i;" [works with and observes the development of the well child, and is thus 
'"^(better able to evaluate deviations in behavior which may accompany 
'* [illness. 

'^"^( The Payne \Vhitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity of 
/fl08 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational and 
^'Mrecreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of psychiatric 
■^ patients. The close association between the psychiatric, medical and 
'^rnursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a con- 
''kultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the relationship 
^-[between mental and physical illness throughout her experience in the 
'F^ (Hospital. 

The Out-Patient Department with its 82 clinics provides opportunity 

for the study of a large number of patients who come for general health 

supervision, diagnosis of disease and for treatment of disease that can 

r; ibe conducted on an ambulatory basis. Each year more than 250,000 pa- 

'■': Itient visits are made to this Department. 

Students assist in diagnostic tests, in treatments and in teaching pa- 
tients so that care without hospitalization can be effective. Arrangements 
for continuity of care through use of referrals to public health nursing 
li^encies are an essential part of clinic experience. Opportunitv is pro- 
\ ided for participation in the guidance of expectant mothers through 
nother's classes and individual conferences and for study of the family 
approach to health maintenance and care of children. 

The Hospital for Special Surgery provides care and carries out research 
and teaching related to the needs of patients with orthopedic and rheu- 
matic diseases. It has a capacity of 170 beds and 55,000 visits are made 
mnually by patients who are being treated in the many special clinics 
of the Out-Patient Department. Ninsing students have an opportunity 



4 



10 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

to participate in the care of patients of all ages who are affected by a widq li 
range of problems. 

COOPERATING COMMUNITY AGENCIES 

Experience is provided in family health counseling, bedside nursing, 
and in the appropriate use of community agencies through cooperation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York and the Visiting Nurse 
Association of Brooklyn. These agencies provide generalized family 
health services for patients in their homes. 

Immediately after graduation, a short, additional experience in public 
health nursing in an official agency may be available to a limited number 
on a student basis, through arrangements with the New York State 
Department of Health. Students with good scholastic records and a 
definite interest in public health nursing as a career are given prefereno 
among those who request this experience. 

Members of the staff of the New York City Department of Health plar 
with the faculty of the School for appropriate ways to contribute to th( 
student program. The Kips Bay Yorkville Health Center serves the dis 
trict in which the School of Nursing is located. It affords students ar 
opportunity to observe the relationship between the New York Cit 
Department of Health and The New York Hospital-Cornell Medicajjioi> 

Center 

Ifc: 

ADMISSION ^ 

I: 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF REQUIREMENTS 

Nursing requires women of integrity and intelligence who have a dee| 
interest in public service. Candidates are selected whose credentials in 
dicate high rank in health, scholarship, maturity, ability to work witl ' 
people, and who give evidence of personal fitness for nursing. A mini 
mum of two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive of Physica 
Education) is required for admission. 



SELECTION OF A COLLEGE FOR THE FIRST TWO YEARSSbI) 

It, 
To meet the requirement of two years of college for admission, a ver 

wide choice of colleges is available as the content of these two years i 

general liberal arts and may be taken in any university, college, or junio 



5r:c 



feal 



ADMISSION 11 

iollege accredited by one of the regional associations of colleges and 
econdary schools. Applicants may therefore take the first two years at 
my one of a gieat many colleges throughout the country or in one of 
he colleges of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The work of the 
irst two years required for admission to this School contains no nursing 

f- "pre-nursing" courses and, therefore, selection of a college in which 
take the first two years is NOT dependent upon its offering a pre- 
jiursing program. 

Help in the selection of a college may be obtained by referring to the 
ist of "Students in the School" which appears at the back of our School 
<i Nursing bulletin as this list indicates the colleges from which students 
low in the School of Nursing have transferred. The list is, however, not 
I complete list of the colleges from which students may transfer. 

In selecting a college and registering for the courses of your first two 
ears, read carefully the section below on "Educational Requirements 
or Admission." 



EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

^Vithin the tivo-} ear liberal arts program of the first two college years 
lequired for admission, only 15 credits are in specified subjects as 
Jollows: 

lequired: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoolog)' (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Recommended: 



Students are urged to obtain a course in sociology or social anthro- 
)ology. Other subjects which are especially helpful but in which there 
s no specified requirement are: 

English, Literature, Human Relations, History. 
Desirable: 



Subjects next in importance depending upon the special interest and 
ibilities of the student and the courses available are: 

Languages (may be of particular usefulness with patients and also 
for the many opportunities in international work and in ad- 
vanced study) 

Economics, Physics 

(continued on page 12) 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Art, Music 

Additional courses in physical or biological sciences (for students 
taking more than 60 credits) 

However not more Uian 12 Jiours of biological science can be 
accepted toward meeting the 60 credit hours required for 
admission. 

The progiam in the School of Nursing requires the student to have 
a good backgiound in English composition, communications skills, and 
use of the library. Should a student prove markedly deficient in com- 
munication skills she may be required to strengthen her backgiound by 
taking coiuscs at a nearby uni\ersity. Courses which are not accepted 
as fulfilling the 6-hour credit requirements in biological sciences are 
human anatomy, physiolog}', and bacteriology, as these courses are in- 
cluded in the professional progiam after admission to the School of 
Nursing. In general the principle applies that those courses given within 
the School of Nursing cannot be credited towards meeting admission^ 
requirements because there is no allowance within the School of Nur> 
ing program for electives which can be substituted for courses alreach 
taken. 

Students on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca should confer 
early with their advisors in the college in which they are registered oi 
with the Office of the Dean of \Vomen. Advisors will be glad to assist in 
planning a desirable program. Ihese students as well as students in col- 
leges other than Cornell should, however, comnmnicate with the School 
of Nursing as indicated under "Application for Admission." Each time 
you register for your courses during your first two years, it is suggested 
that you take this bulletin with you and re\ iew this section with your 
advisor. Applicants who do not meet in full the specific subject require- 
ments for admission, but who have a good record of two or more years 
of college are encouraged to communicate with the School of Nursing 
for review of their credits and possible assistance in arranging for courses 
which can be taken in suninier sessions. 



ADMISSION 13 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifications, 
there are not definite age limits. In general, however, it has proven de- 
sirable for applicants to be between the ages of 18 and 35 years. The 
results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a dental 
examination must be submitted at the time of application. Innoculation 
against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox are required of 
all students; in addition the applicant must have a Schick Test and if 
the reaction is positive must be immunized against diphtheria before 
admission to the School. 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nursing, 
containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the form at 
the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. Ap- 
plicants for admission should include with their application an appli- 
cation fee of $5.00 (not refundable.) As one measure of suitability for 
nursing, certain psychometric tests are required before admission. The 
applicant is asked to meet the charge of $7.00 for these tests. 

A personal interview is considered an important part of the applica- 
tion procedure. Effort is made to have the applicant meet with a member 
of the Committee on Admissions at the School in New York. If this is 
not practicable, a conference can often be arranged with an alumna or 
other qualified person living in the vicinity of the applicant's home or 
college. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants contact the School as early 
as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their programs 
in high school and college to gain the best possible educational back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal application 
should be made during the first term of the first college year if the appli- 
cant plans to enter this school after her second college year. When all 
application forms are received, including the report of the psychometric 
test and a transcript covering the first year of college work, and these 
appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted pending satis- 
factory fulfillment of all remaining requirements. 

A candidate for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon notifi- 
cation of this provisional acceptance to the School. This assures that a 
place will be held for her in the entering class, pending satisfactory 



14 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

completion of all admission prerequisites. The full amount is creditec 
toward the graduation fee. The deposit is not refundable if the applicant 
does not register. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

Each term is 12 weeks in length and the established system of grading ij 
a scale of F to A, w^ith D as the lowest passing grade. An average of C 
for each term is required for promotion without condition. A gi ade of C 
is required in tht^ courses Fundamentals of Nursing and Pharmacology I. 
A grade below C in any clinical field of nursing practice or a term aver- 
age which is less than C places a student on condition. This must be 
removed by the end of the next term to insure further promotion. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the judg 
ment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she can 
complete the course satisfactorily w^ithin a reasonable period of time. 

An F (Failure) in any subject may necessitate withdrawal from the 
School unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, ir 
which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the instruc 
tor, if the course is available. With faculty approval a similar course ma) 
be taken at another university in the city, if not available at this School. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case ol 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and onl} 
upon the recommendation of the instructoi' and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the stu- 
dent to aiTange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory to it. 
A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a Pro- 
motion Committee. Tier accomplishment in \heorf and practice and her 
relationships with patients and co-workers are taken into account. A 
student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her work or who 
does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the qualifications 
which are important for a good nurse may be put on condition or asked 
to withdraw from the School. The School reserves the privilege of re- 
taining only those students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy 
the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal suitability for 
nmsing. 

Parents or guardians of students under twenty-one years of age are 
advised when students are placed on condition or asked to leave the 
School. However, in general, the School reports only to students. Each 



HEALTH SERVICE 15 

Student is kept informed of her progress through frequent examinations, 
reports and conferences, and every effort is made to provide assistance 
and guidance which will help her to succeed. When it seems advisable 
a student may be asked to withdraw from the program without having 
been on condition. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing is conferred by The Society of the 
New York Hospital. In order to qualify for the degree and diploma, 
the student must maintain a cumulative average of C for the total pro- 
gram, and must have completed satisfactorily all of the theory and 
practice outlined in this Announcement or required by decision of the 
faculty. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Good health is of the utmost importance and students have readily 
available to them a well-organized health service which is maintained in 
cooperation with the health service of the Center. Provision is also made 
for hospital care. 

Upon admission to the School a physical examination by the school 
physician and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray is 
required every six months, and a physical examination during each 
school year. The Mantoux test is given during the preclinical period. 
Students receive dental health service consisting of a full mouth series of 
X-rays, examination by a dentist, a written diagnosis with suggestions 
for treatment, and follow-up supervision. For repair of dental defects, 
students are referred to their own dentists. 

In the event of short term illness requiring bed care, students are ad- 
mitted to a special floor of The New York Hospital which is maintained 
for this purpose. If more seriously ill, students are cared for on other 
floors of the Hospital within the limits of the Hospital's policy on ad- 
missions and bed usage, and hospitalization up to the amount of eight 
weeks for any one admission is provided. Elective surgery and dental 
work are not included and if not taken care of before admission to the 
School must be arranged during vacations. Expenses for private nurses, 
transfusions and personal items are borne by the student. The School re- 
serses the right to collect all hospitalization benefits available through 
third parties for any period of care coming within the provisions of these 
benefits. 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The fees for health service, dental service and hospitalization insur- 
ance are listed under school fees in this bulletin. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a student's 
health makes it unwise for her to remain in the School, she may be re- 
quired to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any time. 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 

A vacation of four weeks is given in both the first and second years. 
All vacations are arranged to conform to the requirements of the pro- 
gram but usually fall within the Summer months. 

Because of the nature of assignments, a leave of absence usually neces- 
sitates absence for an entire term. As a result of absence, a student may be 
required to re-register for a course of study or a nursing practice period, 
or she may be transferred to a later class. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence adjacent to the Hospital. Every 
effort has been made in the construction and equipment of the Residence 
to provide for the normal and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are located 
on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively furnished single 
rooms with running water. Each floor has ample baths, showers, and 
toilet facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoining 
kitchenette for informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch of 
the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

A large auditorium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sun 
roofs, television sets and a hobby room are also available. There are 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 17 

pianos for student use. Student activities planned jointly with the 
Cornell University Medical College are a regular part of the recreation 
and include glee club and dramatic productions. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach equip- 
ment and an outdoor grill are available. 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities, a Residence 
Director and a well-qualified instructor in Physical Education are in 
charge. House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is 
made up of representatives of those living in the Residence, of staff mem- 
bers living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for 
friends and relatives at a reasonable charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless in 
music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Committee, 
students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities as mem- 
bership in Town Hall Morning Lecture Course, the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, American Museum of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera 
Guild, Institute of Arts and Sciences, and the Student and Professional 
Ticket Service. 

An annual fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports the 
varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The Blue 
Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships for both 
medical and nursing students, the Christian Nurses' Fellowship and the 
Newman Club. Guest speakers and planned forums provide an opportu- 
nity for exchange of thought on many subjects. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule which 
is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all students. The 
Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, Judicial Coun- 
cil and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on Student Affairs 
acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organization and, with the 
Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty meetings which provide 
for informal discussions of school activities and problems. 



I 
18 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE II 



Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one or ^ 
more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater prob- 1 
lem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course of study, ,' 
freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature is important. ; 
For this reason it is held to be the responsibility of a student who is con- 
templating marriage during her period in the School to discuss her pro- 
posed plans well in advance with the Dean and to obtain permission to 
remain in the School. 

Under certain conditions permission to live outside the Residence may 
be granted to a married student provided in the judgment of the School 
this will not interfere with the student's School responsibilities. The 
faculty record their belief that responsibility for maintaining the quality i 
of her work and for continuing participation in School activities must ! 
be accepted by the student. A married applicant is accepted if in the 
judgment of the Admissions Committee she meets these requirements. 
She may be asked to live in the Residence for at least the first six months. 

Students anticipating marriage are expected to make plans which will 
fit into their regular vacation or school schedule as leave of absence can 
rarely be granted except for an entire term. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The School maintains active counseling services which are available 
to any student who needs assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in her normal work in the School or in con- 
nection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that those 
students who need help on questions of educational program, finances, 
health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to those mem- 
bers of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in relation to 
the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for any 
student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase of her 
life while in the School of Nursing. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the ten 



]-0 
iiai 
I'd: 



lumnae associations which helped to bring about the national profes- 
Lonal organization of nurses, now known as the American Nurses' Asso- 
iation. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part of the Cornell 
Jniversity Alumni Association. 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 



19 



RE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 10-12. 

Required courses: 

Chemistry— (including laboratory) 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 

Psychology 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects 45 

'otal (Pre-Professional) 

fROFESSIONAL (32 months). In the School of Nursing. 



Semester Hrs. Credit 

.... G 

.... 6 

.... 3 



60 



Semester Hours Credit 



Units 



II 



III 



IV 



Orientation 

Physical Education 

Biological Sciences 

Biochemical Science 

Social Sciences 

Nutrition 

Pharmacology 

Fundamentals of Nursing and 

Allied Courses 

Public Health Nursing ... 
Clinical Nursing 



7 

3 

4 

0.5 

0.5 


(No Credit) 
(No Credit) 

4 3 
1 1.5 

2 






8 


4.5 2 

5 

27 17 


3 
3 




3 


38.5 28.5 


6 


96 



Total (Professional) 

Grand Total (required for B.S. in Nursing) 156 

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum covers a period of thirty-two months. 
;n each clinical service, related classes, conferences, and bedside instruc- 
:ions are given concurrently with practice and emphasis is placed on 
iisease prevention, health instruction and rehabilitation. The student 
'eceives selected experiences in evening and night duty. An introduction 



20 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

to community nursing is provided through conferences and observation 
in various agencies assisting with health problems. The student par- 
ticipates in discussions centering around family health and assists in the 
referral of patients requiring nursing care after hospital discharge. An 
eight-week period of supervised practice in family health service is pro- 
vided through affiliation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York 
and the Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum as the 
need arises. The professional program, divided into four units of thcor\ 
and experience, follows. 

UNIT I 

This unit consists of 24 weeks which arc devoted primarily to class and 
laboratory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the 
pa\ilions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at Christmas 
time. Following are the courses presented: 

Course Title 

Orientation 

Fundamentals of Nursing 
Matlicniatics Related to Drugs 
Anatomy— Histology- 
Physiology . . 
Biochemistry 
Microbiology 
Foundations for Clinical Nursing 

Early Growth and Development 

Psychosocial and Cultural Aspects of Nursing I 
The Community and the Nurse 
Nutrition 
Physical Filucation 

Total 691 23 



UNIT II 

During Unit II. which is 52 weeks in length, the student is assigned to 
five clinical areas for theory and practice. These include the Out-Patient 
Department, the Operating and Recovery Rooms, Medicine, Surgery 
and Obstetrics. A vacation of three weeks is given in the summer. 

In the Out-Patient Department the student has an opportunity to 
learn something of the medical and nursing needs of patients who are, 
for the most part, carrying on their usual life activities, while being 



Course 


Class 


Wks. 


Semester 


No. 


Hours 


Practice 


Hrs. 


Credit 


120 


15 









121 


325 






7 


122 


15 






0.5 


100 


60 






2.5 


101 


45 






2.5 


102 


60 






3 


103 


45 






o 


124 


15 






1 


107 


15 






1 


105 


15 






1 


108 


30 






9 


135 


12 

42 






0.5 





THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 21 

treated for some health problem, or learning to live with some physical 
limitation. She is assigned to the clinics of medicine, surgery and pedi- 
atrics. During her in-patient experience on the medical and surgical 
services, she has experience not only on the "general" services but in 
such specialties as ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology and neuro- 
surgery. 

It is not anticipated that the student will develop a high degree of 
technical skill in the operating room. However, through supervised prac- 
tice and observations at the field of operation, and by participating in 
the care of patients in the Recovery Room, the ground work is laid for 
understanding of the nurse's responsibilties to the patient, not only dur- 
ing the operation, but immediately preceding and following it. 

In the Woman's Clinic, assignments for practice include activities re- 
lated to the newer concepts of maternal and newborn care, which are 
embodied in such terms as "preparation for labor" and "rooming-in." 
The student has experience in the Out-Patient Department, delivery 
floor, nursery and post-partum units. 

The program for this Unit is as follows: 

Course Title Course Class Wks. Semester 

No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Psychosocial and Cultural Aspects of Nursing II . . 106 15 1 

Professional Problems I 110 15 I 

Principles of Medical Nursing 140 68 4.5 

Practice of Medical Nursing including 

Neurological Nursing 141 12 3 

Core Course in Operating Room, Surgical 

and Out-Patient Nursing 125 66 4.5 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 150 24 1.5 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 151 12 3 

Principles of Nursing in the Out-Patient Dept. . . 118 20 1.5 

Practice of Nursing in the Out-Patient Dept. ... 119 6 1.5 

Principles of Operating Room Nursing 157 32 2 

Practice of Operating Room Nursing 158 6 1.5 

Principles of Maternity Nursing 160 78 5 

Practice of Maternity Nursing 161 12 3 

Principles of Gynecological Nursing 162 8 0.5 

Historical Backgrounds of Nursing 109 30 2 

Pharmacology 123 30 2 

Diet Therapy and Cooking 136 36 1 

Physical Education 36 

Total 458 48 38.5 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

UNIT III 

This Unit is also 52 weeks in length and there is a four-week vacation! 
during the summer term. An eight-week affiliation with the Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York or the Visiting Nurse Association of Brook- 
lyn, family health agencies, provides an opportunity for the student 
to care for patients in their homes and to teach members of the family 
to give necessary care between visits of the nurse. 

During another eight-week unit of time the student considers the spe- 
cial nursing problems related to long-term illness and to rehabilitation. 
At this time her experience includes the care of patients with tuber- 
culosis or with orthopedic conditions. She visits various agencies and 
facilities in the community which offer services to the aged and to those 
with special handicaps such as cerebral palsy. A 12-week assignment to 
the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development includes ex- 
perience in Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant floor and 
the unit for older children. A similar 12-week period is spent in the 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic where the student has an opportunity 
to gain a keen appreciation of the causes of mental and emotional illness, 
of the ways in which such illness may be prevented, and knowledge of 
the newer methods of therapy for its relief. 

Experience is also provided in Diet Therapy and in Urologica 
Nursing. 

The Progiam for this Unit is as follows: 



< 



75 




5 




12 


3 


74 




5 




12 


3 


25 




1.5 


30 




1.5 




8 


2 



Course Title Course Class Wks. Semester 

No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credl 

Principles of Pediatric Nursing 170 

Practice of Pediatric Nursing 171 

Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 180 

Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 181 

The Nurse in PubHc Health 115 

Introduction to Public Health Nursing 116 

Practice of Public Health Nursing 117 

Principles of Nursing in Long Term Illness 

(Including Tuberculosis and Orthopedics) . . 126 33 2 

Practice of Nursing in Long Term Illness 

(Including Tuberculosis and Orthopedics) ... 127 8 2 

Principles of Urological Nursing 152 15 1 

Practice of Urological Nursing 153 4 1 

Diet Therapy Conferences 138 8 0.5 

Diet Therapy Practice 137 4 1 

Physical Education 12 

Total 272 48 28.5 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 23 

UNIT IV 

The last unit of the professional program is 12 weeks in length. The 
student is now ready to accept almost complete responsibility for ana- 
lyzing and planning to meet the nursing needs of selected patients. She 
returns for twelve weeks to one of the services on which she had experi- 
ence earlier in her program, and with a minimum of guidance plans and 
carries out the nursing care of patients who present complex nursing 
problems. She functions as leader of the nursing "team" and has charge 
responsibility on a pavilion for limited periods of the day, evening or 
night. 

Within the clinical department where she is having this term of ex- 
perience the student may choose a special nursing problem to explore 
in detail. This would include extensive library investigation and may 
take her into any part of the Medical Center or into other community 
agencies. Her findings are shared with other students and with faculty 
members. 

Courses and experience in Unit IV are: 

Course Title Course Class Wks. Semester 

No. Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Activities and Relationships in the Hospital Unit . 128 15 1 

Professional Problems II Ill 15 1 

Senior Conferences and Seminars 130 15 1 

Senior Experience 129 12 3 

Total 45 12 6 

Grand Total (Professional Program) 1469 108 96 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



(Subject to variation or change) 

On Approx. Approx. Approx. 

Admission March 15 March 15 March 15 Total 

TUITION AND FEES (6 months) {12 mos.) (12 mos.) (6 months) 

(Application Fee $5.00) 

Matriculation % 10.00 % 10.00 

Tuition 140.00 $140.00 $130.00 $ 40.00 450.00 

Public Health Field Ex- 
pense 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 2.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 9.00 

Health Service 6.00 12.00 12.00 3.00 33.00 

^Hospitalization In- 
surance 4.80 9.60 9.60 2.40 26.40 

Dental Service 4.00 4.00 4.00 12.00 

Nursery School 5.00 5.00 

Graduation 25.00* 25.00 

S196.80 $168.60 $223.60 $ 71.40 $660.40 
UNIFORMS 

^Uniforms & Accessories. $ 91.52 $ 7.00 $98.52 

Sweater 5.25 5.25 

Shoes 12.75 $ 12.75 25.50 

Scissors & Name Pin 3.37 3.37 

Laboratory Coats 9.00 9.00 

Rental Public Health 

Uniforms 7.50 7.50 

Graduation Uniform & 

Cap 9.25 9.25 

$121.89 $ 12.75 $ 23.75 $158.39 

OTHER REQUIRED EXPENSES: Expenses in the first column, with 

exception of field trips, are paid on admission, but in later terms w^^ 
occur throughout the term rather than in one payment. 

Books & Manuals $ 45.00 $ 15.00 $ 10.00 $ 5.00 $ 75.00 

Gymnasium Suit 8.75 8.75 

Field Trips 3.00 3.00 30.00 4.00 40.00 

Student Activities & 

Handbook 6.25 5.25 5.25 16.75 

^Meals x x x 

$ 63.00 $ 23.25 $ 45.25 S 9.00 $140.50 
TOTAL FEES AND 

EXPENSES $381.69x $204.60 $292.60x $ 80.40 $959.29x 

24 






FEES AND EXPENSES 25 

METHOD OF PAYiMENT 

Upon tentative acceptance for admission, a deposit of $25.00 is re- 
quired. This is credited as the graduation fee but is not refundable if 
the student withdraws her application or does not finish. On admission, 
payment is due on registration day for tuition and fees for the first six 
months, for the uniforms and certain other expenses listed. A statement 
of fees payable on that day will be sent to each accepted applicant shortly 
before registration day. 

The second payment of fees and tuition is due on approximately 
March 15 following admission and covers a 12 months period; the third 
payment is due the following March 15 for a 12 months period; the last 
payment is due on approximately March 15 prior to the June graduation 
for the last 3 months period. Students are billed in advance. Fees become 
due on the first day of the March term and must be paid not later than 
twentv davs after the first dav of the term. 



SPECIAL FEES: For change of schedule, classes, or clinical assignment, 
reinstatement following leave of absence— SI 0; special arrangement 
for examination— §2; specially scheduled clinical conferences— fee 
as for tutoring. For reasons judged adequate in exceptional circimi- 
stances a special fee may be waived by the Dean. 

NOTES ON FEES LISTED ON OPPOSITE PAGE 

^Hospitalization Insurance is Associated Hospital Service— Blue Cross. 
See under METHOD OF PAYMENT for further information. 

Tor uniforms and accessories the total listed will be sufficient for most 
students but if uniforms become worn, a student is expected to purchase 
whatever additional is needed. 

*Meals during first 24 weeks and during Public Health field experience 
are paid for by the student as purchased, totalling approximately SI 3.00 
a week. Otherwise meals are furnished. 

*The deposit of S25 paid at time of acceptance is credited as graduation 
fee and is deducted from final payment, not refundable if student with- 
draws before admission or does not complete progi am. 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School reserves the right to change its tuition and fees in amount, 
time, and manner of payment at any time without notice. 

Articles listed on page 24 under "Uniforms" and under "Other Ex- 
penses" are purchased through the School and obtained after admission 
in accord with instructions given to each student after admission. A list 
of necessary personal equipment will be sent to each accepted applicant 
shortly before registration day. 

Students holding hospitalization insurance at the time of admission 
are required to take out insurance through the School as required for all 
students. Students pay one half of the cost and the other half is paid by 
the Hospital. Refunds for policies held on admission may be claimed 
at the office of former policy. 

MAINTENANCE AND UNIFORM 

With the exceptions indicated below, each student receives main- 
tenance consisting of room, an allowance for meals, and a reasonable 
amount of laundry. During the first 24 weeks in the School and during 
the eight weeks she is having experience with the Visiting Nurse Service, 
the student meets the cost of her meals which are paid for as purchased, 
at approximately $13.00 a week. During vacations the student meets 
the entire cost of her maintenance. For the public health assignment, 
students aie required to provide themselves with navy or dark tailored 
coats and hats appropriate to the season. Other items of uniform are 
listed under expenses. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 

Several scholarships are available each year usually in amounts of $100 
to $400 to students in need of financial assistance. These awards are open 
to both students entering the School of Nursing and those already in the 
School unless otherwise indicated. Factors taken into consideration, in 
addition to financial need, are the student's all-round record as indicated 
by academic work, participation in school and community activities, and 
qualities indicating promise of growth and potential contribution to 
nursing. 

With the exception of the Regents Scholarship, application is made 



II 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 27 

to the Dean, at the time of application for admission to the School for 
entering students. For students already in the School, application is 
nade not later than February 15 for grants to be used in the period 
March 15 to March 15. 

FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS-Established 
iiul maintained by a committee of women interested in the School of 
\ursing to assist girls who otherwise would not be able to prepare for 



f ULIETTTE E. BLOHME SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an 
endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial 
:o Juliette E. Blohme of the Class of 1922 through a gift of $6,000, the 
ntcrest on which may be used in whole or in part each year. 

V I\ IAN B. ALLEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an en- 
lowed fund by a gift of 310,000 from the Vivian B. Allen Foundation, 
[nc, income from which is used to provide scholarship aid annually for 
mc or more students in need of financial assistance. 

JNIASSAU COUNTY (N.Y.) SCHOLARSHIP-Open to entering stu- 
lents residing in Nassau County, New York, who plan to enter the field 
)f public health nursing and hope at some time to hold a position in 
[assau County. Scholarship, $600. 

.EGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS FOR NURSING-Open to residents of 
iNew York State who make application while in high school. Awarded on 
)asis of a competitive examination. Apply to local high school principal. 
Jcholarships are §350 a year. 

LMMAJEAN STEEL FULLER FUND-This Fund, begun in 1952 by 
lie Class of 1952 in memory of Emmajean Steel Fuller, a former member 
)f the Class, is available for an occasional scholarship. 

JTUDENT LOAN FUND— Loans are available to students who have 
jeen in the School at least one term. Applications are made to the Dean. 
\lthough applications are accepted at any time during the year, students 
ire encouraged to plan, as far as possible, for a year at a time and make 
Application by February 15 for grants to be used in the period March 15 
"o March 15. 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

For additional information on scholarships and grants-in-aid available 
to students taking their first two years of academic work at Cornell in 
Ithaca, write to Scholarship Secretary, Office of Admissions, Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ithaca, N. Y. 

The following three scholarships for residents of New York State, 
making application while in high school, are available for the first two 
college years as well as for the School of Nursing. 

STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents of New 
York State who are graduates of its common schools and academies. 
Annual award $350 for each of four years while in attendance in any ap- 
proved college in the State. This scholarship may therefore be used for 
the first two years of college required for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, and continues for the first two years in the School of Nursing. 
Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local high school 
principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE WAR ORPHANS SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents of 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and academies 
and who are children of deceased or disabled veterans of the United 
States. Annual award $350 towards tuition plus $100 for maintenance for 
each of four years while in attendance in any approved college in the 
State. This scholarship may therefore be used for the first two years of 
college required for admission to the School of Nursing and continues 
for the first two years in the School of Nursing. Awarded on the basis of 
Regents examinations under regulations of the State Education Depart- 
ment. Apply to local high school principal, or to Commissioner of 
Education, Albany N. Y. 

STATE CORNELL SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents of New York 
State who are graduates of its common schools and academies. Annual 
award $200 reduction in tuition for each of four years. This scholarship 
may be used by students who take the first two years of their academic 
work at Cornell in Ithaca and for the first two years in the School of 
Nursing. Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local high 
school principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 




zc "~ 




Good nursing calls for constant adaptations within sound principles which draw 
from the facts of physical, biological, and social sciences. 




During her field assignment in Public Health Nursing, the student goes out into 
the community for experience in family health problems and care of the sick 
in their homes. 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL-CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 



Located at 68th Street and the East River, this medical center co\ers three city blocks— 68tli to t 
Street— and includes The New York Hospital as well as the Cornell University Medical College i 
the Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Ninsing. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 14-15.) 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY-HISTOLOGY. Designed to acquaint the student with the gross and 
microscopic structure of the human body. Laboratory includes cadaver demonstration 
and microscopic examination of prepared slides. 

60 Hours. Unit I. Miss WRIGHT. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course consists of a study of the psysiological systems and 
their integration into the total functions of the human body. It is closely related to 
the course in Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

45 Hours. Unit I. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss MILLER, Miss ERLANDER. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of physiological chemistry, as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism of 
food, and the composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

60 Hours. Unit I. Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GENGHOF, Miss MILLER, Miss 
ERLANDER. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms. Bacteriology 
and immunology as applied to the agents of infectious diseases. 

45 Hours. Unit I. Dr. HEHRE, Miss WRIGHT, Miss MILLER. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

105. PSYCHOSOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF NURSING I. This course 
considers the ways in which social science concepts and methods may be incorporated 
and utilized in nursing. It deals with cultural, psychological and social components of 
human behavior with particular emphasis on the way such knowledge may be applied 
to total patient care. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Mrs. MACGREGOR. 

106. PSYCHOSOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF NURSING II. A more ad- 
vanced and intensive exploration of the aspects outlined in Course 105. 

15 Hours. Unit II. Mrs. MACGREGOR. 

107. EARLY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. Emphasis is given to the factors in 
early childhood which are influential in the lives of children. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Faculty from the departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Out- 
. Patients. 

! 108. THE COMMUNITY AND THE NURSE. Field trips, group projects, oral and 
i written reports concerned with this local Health District and Medical Center. 
30 Hours. Unit I. Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

29 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

109. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF NURSING. An overview of the history 
of nursing from earliest times to the present, studying what has constituted nursing 
and tracing factors which have strengthened or weakened it. Presented against a 
background of developments in the general care and welfare of the sick such as the 
care of mothers and children, old people and the chronically ill. the mentally ill, the 
tuberculous and the evolution of hospitals, medicine and public health. 

30 Hours. Unit II. Miss DUNBAR, and special lecturers. 

110. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS I. Consideration of the philosophical and ethical 
foundations of conduct and their application to the practice of professional nursing. 
Problems related to group life and relationships with patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by students and instructor for analysis and discussion. 

15 Hours. Unit II. Miss LYONS. 

111. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS II. A reading course with 15 hours of class in 
which to bring into focus important professional problems for further reading. The 
purpose is to help the student understand important trends and developments in 
which she will need to play an intelligent part and which she will be expected to 
interpret to others. These include activities related to legislation, education, improve- 
ment of nursing services, costs of medical care, and international participation. 

15 Hours. Unit IV. Miss DUNB.\R and special lecturers. 

PUBLIC HE.VLTH NURSING 

115. THE NURSE IN PUBLIC HEALTH. Principles of public health and public 
health nursing; organization and functions of nursing service and its relationship to 
other services. 

25 Hours. Unit IIL Miss BEISEL. Dr. McDERMOTT. 

116. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Application of principles 
developed in P.H. 115 to the field of public health nursing. .Agency policies and func- 
tions in the hght of principles, community need, and available health services. Group 
discussions, student reports. 

30 Hours. Unit III. Miss TYRIE. Mrs. CAREY, Miss DISOSWAY, Mrs. GELBER and 
staff. 

117. PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Supervised field instruction with 
increasing responsibiUty for a selected group of individuals and famihcs requiring 
nursing care and health guidance at home. Provided by affiliation with the Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York and \'isiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn. 

8 Weeks. Unit III. Miss RANDALL. Miss MOLE and staff. 



OUT-PATIENT (AMBULATORY) NURSING 

118. PRINCIPLES OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Nurs- 
ing care of ambulatory patients, both children and adults, is taught through demon- 
stration and informal family and community-centered conferences. Emphasis is 
placed upon health teaching, and the use of community resources in ensuring compre- 
hensive patient care, and also upon the cooperation of the nurse with other professions 
in a program for health maintenance and for the prevention, control, and rehabilita- 
tion of disease. (See Core Course 125). 
20 Hours. Unit II. Mrs. SHAFER, Miss TERRY, Miss WARREN, Miss TSCHIDA. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

119. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Se- 
lected clinics provide experience in the pediatric, medical and surgical services. The 
student is helped to understand the value of continuity of patient care through work- 
ing closely with other departments of the Hospital and with community agencies. 
6 Weeks. Unit II. Mrs. SHAFER, Miss TERRY, Miss WARREN, Miss TSCHIDA. 



FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND ALLIED COURSES 

120. ORIENTATION. These discussions give the student a general concept of the 
field of nursing and of the responsibilities of the individual choosing this profession. 
It emphasizes the importance of the physical and mental health of the nurse as it 
relates to her personal life and is reflected in her work. 

15 Hours. (Unit I 12 Hours; Unit II I1/2 Hours; Unit III U/2 Hours.) Miss DUNBAR. 
Miss FREDERICK, Miss LYONS, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss McDERMOTT, and 
others. 

121. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING. An introduction to nursing practice designed 
to be a foundation for all of the clinical nursing courses. While the major content of 
the course is concerned with basic nursing procedures used in the hygienic care of the 
patient, in the diagnosis of disease conditions and in the treatment of illness, emphasis 
is also placed on the psychosocial concepts in nursing. Consideration is given to inter- 
personal relationships, age and emotional problems, and problems of chronic and 
acute illness in the hospital and in the community. Beginning the tenth week in the 
program students have limited periods of supervised practice in the clinical divisions 
of the Hospital. 

325 Hours. Units I, II. Miss VAN ARSDALE, Miss MILLAR, Miss SATER. 

122. MATHEMATICS RELATED TO DRUGS. Designed to familiarize the student 
with the systems used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions 
and calculating dosages. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Miss MILLER. • 

123. PHARMACOLOGY. Designed to help the student acquire a knowledge of the 
facts and principles of drug therapy, and the responsibilities of the nurse in administra- 
tion of medicines. A study of the commonly used drugs. 

30 Hours. Units I, II. Miss MILLER. 

124. FOUNDATIONS FOR CLINICAL NURSING. A study of the pathologic changes 
basic to an understanding of specific illnesses which the student will encounter in 
clinical practice. 

15 Hours. Unit I. Dr. KELLNER, and staff. 

125. CORE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM, SURGICAL AND OUT-PATIENT 
NURSING. Lectures and demonstrations focus on the principles basic to the preven- 
tion, the etiology, and the control of disease in the plan for the total care of patients in 
these departments. 

60 Hours. Unit II. Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Departments of Operating 
Room, Surgery and Out-Patient. 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

126. PRINCIPLES OF NURSING IN LONG TERM ILLNESS (INCLUDINi. 
TUBERCULOSIS AND ORTHOPEDICS). Emphasis is on prevention, care, and 
rehabilitation in chronic illness. Recognition is given to the problems and needs of 
patients as well as those of the nurse in providing comprehensive care. Special con- 
sideration is given to individuals having tuberculosis and orthopedic conditions. 

33 Hours. Unit III. Miss McCLUSKEV, Miss SMITH, and others. 

127. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN LONG TERM ILLNESS (INCLUDING TUBER- 
CULOSIS AND ORTHOPEDICS). An experience consisting of practice in the hospital 
and field trips to community agencies which cooperate in providinu; care needed l)\ 
long term illness patients. Practice is carried out with a few selected patients including 
those having oriliopcdic problems and tuberculosis. Part of the practice is carrietl out 
cooperatively with fourth year medical students in the Comprehensive Care Clinic. 
Consideration is given to the contribution the nurse can make in her relationshij)s 
with patients and other health workers. 

8 Weeks. Unit III. Miss McCLUSKEV, and others. I 

128. ACTIVITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS IN THE HOSPITAL UNIT. .\n intro- 
duction to basic managerial activities and personnel relationships in the head nurse 
unit, and the intcrrchacthicss of this unit with the entire hospital. 

15 Hours. Unit IV. Miss SIMMS. 

129. SENIOR EXPERIENCE. The student has an oppoiluniiy to select the clinical 
area in which she will spend the last twelve weeks of the program. She plans and 
tarries out the care of selected patients who have complex nursing needs, functions as 
leader of the nursing team, and participates in the management of the pavilion. She 
is guided in exploring a special nursing problem peculiar to the clinical service in 
wliidi she is interested. 

I'J Weeks. Unit I\'. laculty from all dipai linents. 

i:{(). SENIOR CONFERENCES .tND SEMINARS. Discussions, investigation and 
organized study of nursing problems identified by the student in her senior experience. 
Aimed primarily at devel()ping an appreciation for research in nursing to improve 
patient care. 
IT) Hours. Unit IV. Faculty from all departments. 



NUIRITION 

13'). NUTRITION. Normal adidt nutrition based on the courses in Biochemistry 
and Plnsiologv. A studv of the functions and food sources of the major food groups, 
their a\ailabiliiy in the world and in the community, the needs of the individual and 
relationship of cultural patterns to food habits and nutrition are included. (The 
nutrition recjuirements in childhood and in pregnancy are discussed during the stu- 
dent's practice on pediatric and obstetric services.) 
12 Hours. Unit I. .Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss ERLANDER. 

136. DIET THERAPY AND FOOD PREPARATION. Designed to present the under- 
lying principles in the treatment of disease by diet. It is accompanied by laboratory 
work in principles of food preparation, and in the preparation of foods and meals 
included in therapeutic diets. The course is supplemented by clinical conferences 
during the student's practice on medical, singical. obstetric and pediatric services. 
36 Hours. Units I. II. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss ERLANDER. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 

137. DIET THERAPY PRACTICE. The application of the principles of diet therapy 
to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the Hospital. 

4 Weeks. Unit III. Miss STEPHENSON and staff. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss 
ERLANDER. 

138. DIET THERAPY CONFERENCES. Through conference discussions, integrated 
w^ith the practice assignment, the student is oriented to the practical application of her 
knowledge of nutrition and diet therapy in the care of hospitalized and ambulatory 
patients. 

8 Hours. Units II, III. Miss RYNBERGEN. 



MEDICAL NURSING 

140. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING. The nursing care of patients with 
medical, and neurological diseases is considered. Discussion of medical aspects of dis- 
ease supplements and inteprets etiology, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

68 Hours. Unit II. Dr. BARR and staff. Miss BROOKS, Miss MALLORY, >liss 
HAZELTINE, Miss KNOX. 

141. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL NURS- 
ING. Supervised practice is offered in the application of nursing principles to the 
care of patients on the medical and neurological pavilions of the Hospital. 

12 Weeks. Unit II. 

SURGICAL NURSING 

150. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. The care of surgical patients is 
presented by conference and demonstration. Individualized care, planned instruction, 
and rehabilitation of the patient are stressed. (See Core Course 125) 

24 Hours. Unit II. Miss KLEIN, Miss DERICKS, Miss FEDDER, Miss FOSTER, Miss 
HENDERSON, Miss LIFGREN, Miss SAWYER. 

151. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. Planned experience in meeting patients' 
needs through guided practice in surgical asepsis, pre and post operative teaching 
and therapeutic team relationship. 

12 Weeks. Unit II. 

152. PRINCIPLES OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Anomalies and diseases of the 
genito-urinary tract, management, and nursing care are presented. 

15 Hours. Unit III. Dr. MARSHALL and staff. Miss KLEIN, Miss SAWYER. 

153. PRACTICE OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Planned care during the pre and 
post operative phase with emphasis on the emotional aspects of genito-urinary dis- 
orders, and preparation for self care on discharge. 

4 Weeks. Unit HI. 

OPERATING ROOM NURSING 

157. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Through lectures, discus- 
sions and demonstrations, students are taught the principles and methods of aseptic 
technique in relation to the care of patients at the time of operation. Immediate post- 
operative care is included. (See Core Course 125) 
32 Hours. Unit II. Miss TUFFLEY, Miss SAFFIOTI, Miss JONES. 



34 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

158. PRACTICE OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Students observe and assist 
with operative procedures. They are guided in relating this experience to the total 
care of surgical patients. Experience in Recovery Room is offered at this time. 
6 Weeks. Unit 11. 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

160. PRINCIPLES OF MATERNITY NURSING. Focuses on the reproductive pro- 
cess, the characteristics of the newborn infant, and current developments in obstetrics. 
Knowledge of the social sciences is applied to the understanding of the emotional 
aspects of childbearing, and the family as a social unit. Conference method encourages 
self expression. 

78 Hours. Unit II. Dr. DOUGLAS and staff. Miss HICKCOX, Miss liOVLE. Mrs. 
HOSFORD, Miss KEANE, Miss McVEY, Miss ROBERTSON, Miss ROTHSCHILD, 
Miss SHERMAN. 

161. PRACTICE OF MATERNITY NURSING. Principles are applied in the com- 
prehensive care of mothers and infants, with bedside instruction and supervision in 
out-patient clinics, labor and delivery and rooming-in units. 

12 Weeks. Unit II. Mrs. SHAFER, Miss HICKCOX and staffs. 

162. PRINCIPLES OF GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING. Classes, conferences and 
supervised observation in out-patient clinics centering around the special health 
problems of women. Limited practice during the 4-wcek out-patient assignment. 

8 Hours. Unit II. Dr. DOUGLAS and staff. Miss BOYLE, Miss JACKSON, Miss 
McVEY. 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSIN(.. A study of the representative disease 
conditions of infancy and childhood against a background of the normal physical and 
emotional needs of infants and children. Conferences, case presentations and role 
playing. 

75 Hours. Unit III. Dr. LEVINE and staff. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss STOKES, Miss 
WALLACE. Miss FRIPP. 

171. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Guided experiences in the use of 
knowledge in the care of premature infants, sick infants and children, and children 
in the Nursery School. Group conferences, demonstrations and nursing care plans. 
(Including Nursery School Experience) 

12 Weeks. Unit III. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The history, pathology and treat- 
ment of psychiatric illness, and the basic principles involved in the nursing care of 
patients with personality disorders, from infancv to old age. The program helps tlu 
student to develop an understanding of self and relationships to others, an objective 
attitude toward psychiatric illness and the nurse's role in helping the patient solve 
the problems of his illness and rehabilitation. 

74 Hours. Unit III. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. Miss MUHS, Miss TAIT, Miss 
WEAVER. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 35 

ISl. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the observa- 
tion and care of the emotionally ill patient during the acute phase of illness, con- 
valescence and rehabilitation. Participation in currently approved therapies, including 
psychotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies, and somatic therapies. Guided 
practice in creating a therapeutic and socially rehabiltative environment for patients. 
12 Weeks. Unit III. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Principles of good body mechanics in work and play, and 
how to apply this knowledge in patient care. It aims to develop skill in individual 
and team recreational activities which will enable the student to use leisure time to 
greater advantage. 
90 Hours (Total). Units I, II, III. 



ADMINISTRATION 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL- 
CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 
Joseph C. Hinsey, Director 

JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 



Arthur H. Dean 
Stanton Griffis 

Deane W. Malott, President of the 
University 

John Hay Whitney, Vice-President 
Hamilton Hadley, President of The 

Society of the New York Hosfntal 
Henry S. Sturgis, Vice-President for 

Finance 



Board of Trustees 

of 

Cornell University 



Board of Governors of 

The Society of 
the New York Hospital 



Frederic \\\ Eckfr 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



S. S. A'lwooi), Cfiairman Provost of Cornell University 

Deane \V'. Malott President of Cornell University 

Ruth Irish Trustee of Cornell University 

Cornelius N. Bliss, Jr ^ Governors of The Society of 

Mrs. Charles S. Pavson j the New York Hospital 

David P. Barr President of tlie Medical Board of the Hospital 

Mrs. August Belmont Representative-at-large 

Dorothy V. N. Brooks Drnn of Women, Cornell University 

Mrs. E. Craig Coates ... President, Committee for Scholarships 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 

Joseph C. Hinsey Director, The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 

E. Hugh Luckey Dean, Cornell University Medical College 

Elizabeth Ogden, '44 Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Henry N. Pratt Director of The New York Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of tJie Visiting Nurse Sei-vice of 

New York 

36 



ADMINISTRATION 37 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

DeaneW. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D President of Cornell 

University 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Associate Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M.A Counselor of Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A Director of the Residence 

Jane Bevan, A.B Assistant in Public Relations 

Mary Jo Munroe, B.A., B.S. in L.S Librarian 

Tracy Dwyer Registrar 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Riddick Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki, A.B Secretary to the Dean 

Carolyn Diehl, M.D School Physician 

Mrs. Ena Stevens-Fisher Supervisor Nurses Health Service 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Miss Dunbar, Chairman Miss Poor, Secretary 

Dr. Barr Miss Hickcox Dr. Luckey Mrs. Shafer 

Miss Brooks Dr. Hinsey Miss Lyons Miss Schubert 

Miss Carbery Miss Klein Mrs. Overholser Miss Tuffley 

CHAIRMEN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admissions Miss Frederick 

Curriculum Miss Lyons 

Library Miss Brooks 

Records Miss Walters 

Student Affairs Miss Kurihara 

Scholarships Miss Dunbar 

Promotions: 

Unit I Miss Rynbergen 

Unit II Miss Saffioti 

Unit III Miss Tait 

Unit IV Miss Fedder 

Student and Staff Health Miss Beisel 

Affiliating Students .- Miss Wallace 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Louise Hazeltine '49 President 

Marguerite Plow '30 Executive Secretary 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. E. Craig Coates President 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
STUDENTS OF THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

Office of the Dean of Men, Dean of Women Carolyn Hawes 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman ) 

College of Home Economics Je^n Failing 

Professor of Home Economics, CJiairman of Counseling Sewice 

College of Arts and Sciences F. G. Marcham 

Professor of History 

RoLLiN L. Perry 

Assistant Dean 

College of AgTi( ulmrc Howard S. Tyler 

Professor in Personnel Administration 
in ( liarge of Vocational Guidance Placement 

Office of Admissions Robert Storandt 

Associate Director 



FACULTY 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., President of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriett Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of Nursing. 
(A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia University, 1930; Diploma, Bedford College 
and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, London, England, 1936.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickox, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; M.A., 1951; Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in Hospital and 
School of Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columbia University, 1936; M.A., 1951.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing; 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 
1944.) 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Associate Professor of Sciejice. (B.S., Simmons Col- 
lege, 1922; M.S., Cornell University, 1938.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing; Head of Pedia- 
tric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, West- 
ern Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia University, 1932.) 

Kathleen Newton Shafer, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. [Anatomy], University of Washington, 
1934; B.S. in Nursing, University of Washington, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 
1949.) 

39 



40 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Mildred E. Beisel, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; B.A., New York 
University, 1944; M.A., 1946.) 

Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical Xursing: Defmrlvient 
Head, Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939, 
B.S., 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Muriel Carbery, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing: Director of Nursing 
Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing. New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of America, 1951.) 

Mary Jeanne Clapp, M.N., R.N., Assistant Professor in Surgical Nursing (Ortho- 
pedics); Director Nursing Service, The Hospital for Special Surgery. (B..\., Mount 
Holyoke, 1940; M.N., Yale University School of Nursing. 1943.) 

Victoria Frederick, M.A., Counselor of Students. (A.B.. University of IlMnois, 1920; | 
M.A., Columbia University, 1926.) 

Elinor Fuerst, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing. Christ -i 
Hospital School of Nursing, Jersey City, N. J.. 1937; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia . 
University, 1946; M.A., 1951.) 

Frances C. Maccregor. M.A., Visiting Assistant Professor, Social Science. (A.B.. Uni- 
versity of California, 1927; M.A., University of Missouri, 1947.) 

Audrey McCluskey, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing {Chronic Illness and 
Rehabilitation.) (Diploma in Nursing. Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1915; M.A.. Columbia University. 1948.) 

M, Eva Poor, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing: Head 
of Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York University, 1950.) 

Edna Tufflev, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing: Head of ()f)erat- 
ing Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Pawiuckct, R. I.. 1933; B.S., New York University, IIMH; M.A., 1919.) 



INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Bovle. B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and (.ynecologic Out- 
Patient Nursing: Supervisor, Obstetric and ('.ynecologic OutPatient Nursing Service. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing. Scranton, Pa., 1924; 
B.S., Columbia University. 1945.) 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing: Suj)ervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing, 
Paterson, N.J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Constance Derrell. M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. Lincoln 
School of Nursing, New York, 1938; B.S., New York University, 1945; Midwifery 
Certificate, Tuskegee Institute, Ala., 1946; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1948.) 



FACULTY 41 

Helma Fedder, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
'ng Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942; M.N., University of Washington. 1954.) 

Mary J. Foster^ M.N., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Wursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1944; M.N., Yale University School of 
\ursing, 1947.) 

Carol C. Fripp, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. (B.S., Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C, 1944; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Meharry Medical College School of Nursing, Nashville, Tenn., 1948.) 

Louise Hazeltine, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (B.A., Bucknell University, 1946; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., Cornell University, 1949.) 

Mary L. Healy, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Genesee Hospital School of Nursing, Rochester, 
New York; B.S., University of Rochester, 1947.) 

Lilian Henderson, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 1930; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas School of 
Nursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Elizabeth Hosford, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., Keuka College, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1952; Certifi- 
cate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, N.Y., 1953.) 

Vera R. Keane, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; Super- 
visor Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Metropolitan 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., Columbia University, 1949; Certificate in Mid- 
wifery, Maternity Center Association, 1951.) 

Marie Kurihara, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supei~uisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1950; B.S., Cornell University, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 195(3.) 

Edna Elizabeth Lifgren, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 
1954.) 

Cynthia Mallory, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing. (B.A., Scarritt College, 
Nashville, Tenn., 1935; R.N., The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1946.) 

Frances McVey, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Immaculate Hospital School 
of Nursing, New York, 1946; B.S., St. John's University, 1954.) 



42 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Dorothy Metzger, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric \ursing: Supcn>isor iu ObstetrU 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1947; B.S., Cornell University, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 195:^ 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing: Night Sir ■r. 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Johnston Hospital Si ■ ol 
of Nursing, Manila, P. I., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1934.) I 

Marjorie Miller, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Science. (Diploma in Nursing. Luii ,ii 
Hospital School of Nursing. Cleveland; B.S.. \VilIiam J. Bryan University, D.t n, 
Tenn., 1949; M.S., Columbia University, 1954.) 

Eleanor Muhs, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Assistant Director / v- 
chiatric Nursing Sendee. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of Nuimiij^, 
Rochester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948; M..\., Columbia Univci 
sity, 1954.) 

Wanda Robertson, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Ob^' "• 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. University of Minnesota School of Nu 
1945; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1945.) 

Sue Sabia, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Department Head, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. Elizabeth Cicnoral Hospital School 
of Nursing, Elizabeth. N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M..'\., 1950.) 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.X., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Suprrvisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. St. Michael's Hospital School of Nursing, 
Newark, N.J. , 1939; B.S.. Columlna University. 1951; M.A., 1951.) 

Janet R. Sawyer. B.S., R.N., Instructor, Surgical Nursing: Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1946; B.S., Cornell University. 1946.) 

Doris Schwartz. B.S.. R.N., Instructor in Medical Out Patient Nursing: Supervisor, 
Comprehensive Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing. Methodist 
Hospital School of Nursing. Brooklyn. New York. 1912; B.S.. New York Universitv, 
1953.) 

Laura L. Simms, M.Ed.. R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Administrative Assistant for 
Staff Education. (B.A., Texas State College for Women. Denton, Texas. 1910; Diploma 
in Nursing. Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas, 1915; M.Ed., Southern 
Methodist University, Dallas, 1950.) 

Dean S.mith, M.A., R.N.. Instructor in Surgical Nursing (Orthopedics); Education 
Director, The Hospital for Sfjecial Surger^'. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellcvue Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 19.52; M.A., 1955.) 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M..'\., 1918.) 

Marjorie A. Tait, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Wayne University, Detroit, Mich., 1951.) 

Margaret H. Terry, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nurs- 
ing; Supen'isor, Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital School of Nursing, Manchester, N.H. 1935; 
B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 



FACULTY 43 

Ethel Marie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing; Super- 
visor, Pediatric Out-Patient Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind., 1914; Diploma 
in Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 

Martha Van Arsdale, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., 
Cornell University, 1949; M.A., Columbia University 1956.) 

Grace Wallace, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., University of California, San Francisco, 1942; M.A., Columbia 
University 1956.) 

Jeanette Walters, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; As- 
sistant Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., New York University, 
1944; M.A., 1949.) 

Mamie Wang, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Peiping Medical College School of 
Nursing, Peiping, China, 1938; B.S., Yenching University, China, 1938; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1943.) 

Margie A. Warren, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nurs- 
ing; Supervisor Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nurs- 
sing, Protestant Deaconess Hospital School of Nursing, Evansville, Ind., B.S. Indiana 
University, 1949.) 

Lucille Wright, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Science. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., University of Colorado, 1950; M.S., 
Cornell University, 1955.) 



FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

OsKAR Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

R. Gordon Douglas, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Vincent du Vigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D Professor of Surgery 

John G, Kidd, M.D Profesor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D Dean 

Walsh McDermott, M.D. . . . Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

James M. Neill, Ph.D Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Robert F. Pitts,' M.D Professor of Physiology 

Walter F. Riker, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology^ 

Dorothy Genghof, Ph.D Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Assistant Professor in Biochemistry, School of Nursing 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 

ASSISTANTS IN INSTRUCTION 

Marjorie H. Agnew, M.A., R.N., Assistant i?i Medical and Surgical Nursing: Suf» >- 
visor. Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1940; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., Teachers College, Columhia 
University, 1952.) 

Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing: Night Supen>isor Medi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing. 1931.) 

Isabel Cameron, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing: Evening Supennsor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Winnepeg General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Winnepeg, Canada, 1929; B.S., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Theresa Christian, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing: Evening Supen'isor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. Frcedman Hospital School of Nursing, 
Washington, D.C., 1937; B.S., Loyola University, Chicago. III.. 1911; M.S.. University 
of Chicago, 1947.) 

Jane D. Curtis, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing: Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (B.S., Dickinson College, Carlisle. Pa., 1939; Diploma in Nursing. Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942.) 

Julia Dennehy, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing: Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Riverside Hospital Schot)l of Nursing, 
Yonkers, New York, 1943; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A., 1956.) 

Alice Marie DonDero, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing: Supcrxfisor in Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. Long Island College Hospital School of 
Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951.) 

DoROTiiv Douv.ARD, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing: Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Providence 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1945.) 

Darlene Erlander, B..\., Assistant in Science. (B..\.. St. Olaf College. Northfield, 
Minnesota. 1952.) 

Laura Fawcett, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing: Evening Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing. Philadel- 
phia, 1936; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1956.) 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing: Night Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing. Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1935.) 

DoROTiiv Jackson. B.S., R.N., Assistant in Gynecological Nursing: .Assistant Super- 
visor, Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue School of Nurs- 
ing. 1946; B.S., Hunter College, 1953.) 

Gladys Tyson Jones, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing: Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Teachers College, Columl)ia University. 1951.) 

44 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 45 

Ruth E. Kenny, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A., 1956.) 

Jane Knox, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stanford University Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; 
B.A., Stanford University, 1945; M.A., Columbia University, 1955.) 

Claire Meyerowitz, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.S., Cornell University, 1945.) 

Mary Millar, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1954; B.S., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1954.) 

Elizabeth Peeling, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1955; B.S., Cornell 
University, 1955.) 

Irma K. Riley, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Montreal General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1948; B.S., Columbia University, 1955.) 

Mary Rothschild, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor in Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1954; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1954.) 

Anita Sater, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1952; B.S., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1952.) 

Jeanne Sherman, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing, Assistant Super-visor, Ob- 
stetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Skidmore College, 1947; B.S., Skidmore 
College, 1947.) 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxton 
Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Elizabeth Mary Simmons, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School of Nursing, 
Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., 1952.) 

Jessie Weaver, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 1924.) 

Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing. 
Waverly, Mass., 1933.) 



46 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

LECTURERS 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures 

Cornell University Medical College 

STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Helen V. Miller, R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N Night Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N Evening Administrative Assistant 

Dju Inc., M.S Relief Administrative Assistant 

Elizabeth McKeown, B.S., R.N . . Assistant in Staf] Education 

Martha Weller, B.S., R.N Assistant in Staff Education 

Eleanor Young, R.N Assistant in Staff Education 

Lois Cantrfll, B.Ed., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lefa Rose, R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Beafrice McKee, R.N . . . Supervisor, Psychiatric Service 

Carolyn Wagner, R.N . Supervisor, Out-Patient Department 

Inez Mullins, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ruth NiFLSEN, R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Maude David, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N. . . Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Dorothy Ellison. B.A., R.N. Supewisor, General Operating Rooms 

Lucy Hickey, R.N Supervisor, Private Operating Rooms 

Eloise Cooke, R.N Assistant Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Lydia H. Hansen, R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Dorothy Knapp, R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Anna Lyon, M.A., R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Staff 

Francis Sheedy, R.N Assistant Supervisor of Auxilary Staff 

Mary Kirk, B.S., R.N Instructor, Practical Nursing Students 

Acnes Morgan, B.S., R.N Instructor, Practical Nursing Students 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 



47 



Bailey, Jane 
Buehler, Meta, B.S. 
Greus, Ruth, B.S. 



Berg, Helen, B.S. 
Bitting, Amy 
Caron, Theresa 
Cheroniak, Tillie 



HEAD NURSES 

MEDICINE 

Ibsen, Doris 
Lagerquist, Elaine, B.S. 

SURGERY 

Cullington, Barbara 
Dieterle, Doris 
Erlandson, Margaret, B.S. 
Lubowska, Nina 



Myers, Margaret, B.S. 
White, Marion, B.S. 



Pruchnik, Blanche 
Scola, Antoinette 
Young, Eleanor 



Bosco, Antoinette, B.S. 
Brodzinski, Bernadine 
Burley, Wanda 
Burnett, Dorothy 
Collins, Margaret, B.S. 
Derr, Barbara 
Edmundson, Ida 



Bott, Alma 
Colwell, Anna 
Conner, Agnes 
Dobranski, Anna 
Hammond, Grace 



OPERATING ROOM 

Farmer, Rosemary 
Frank, Mary 
Freundlich, Gerda 
Husted, Salome 
Maclnnis, Mora 
Martella, Nancy 



O'Connor, Christine ' 
Ondovchik, Anna, B.S. 
Rau, Rozalia, B.A. 
Rectanus, Dorothy 
Sulette, Mary, B.S. 
Vella, Mary 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Leonardo, Yolanda 
Lovette, Virginia 
Lucas, Geraldine 
Matus, Veronica 
Mercer, Anne 



O'Rourke, Mary, B.S. 
Spencer, Natalie 
Thomas, Barbara, B.S. 
Young, Kathleen 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



Bartlett, Mary 
Carman, Edna 
Clark, Evelyn 
Connolly, Kathleen, B.S. 
Evans, Alberta 



Foley, Alice 
Frohman, Marie 
Hines, Marilyn 
Lambert, Lucille 
Liddle, Evelyn 



Nelson, Virginia, B.A., M.S. 
Ricci, Claire 
Sweeney, Claire, B.S. 
Toter, Roseanne 



Canty, Mary, B.S. 
Gerchak, Helen 
Kozitsky, Mary 



Bertagna, Elda 
Desmond, Anne, B.S. 



PRIVATE PATIENTS 

McKeown, Ann, B.S. 
Morgan, Agnes, B.S. 
Reynolds, Mary 

PEDIATRICS 

Dial, Hazel 

Gallo, Louise 



Slater, Amy 
Smith, Anne 
Soranno, Jenny 



Frank, Myra 

Zemlock, Margaret, B..A. 



Auger, Lillian 
Genereux, Joanne 
Hibbard, Alta 



PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 

Janes, Carl 
Pitt, Marguerite 



Puzzo, Emma 
Ulatowski, Amelia 



48 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Louise Stephenson, M.S., Director 

Susan Dunbar, B.S. Emily Kroog, B.S. 

Susan Foresman, B.S. Susan Paige, B.S. 

Donna Hovet, B.S. Virginia Pearson Snyder, B.S. 

Catherine Kellerman, B.S. Carol Sullivan, B.S. 

Rita Krim, B.S. 

OCCUPATIONAL AND RECREATIONAL THERAPY 

Claire Glasser, B.S., O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Main Hospital 

Mildred Spargo, O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Psychiatry 

Grace C. Newberg, B.A Director, Recreational Therapy, Psychiatry 

MuHi Yasumura, M.A., O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Pediatrics 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Thi.odate H. Soule, M.A Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel, A.B Director, The Lying-in Hospital 

Elizabeth F. Hewitt, M.A Chief Social Worker, Payne Whitney Clinic 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Marian Randall, B.S. , R.N Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Service of New York 

Eleanor W. Mole, B.S Executive Director 

and staff Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 



NURSERY SCHOOLS 

Mrs. Eleanor Blumgart, ALA. Director of Nursery School, Department of Pediatrics 

Mrs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Director, Bank Street Nursery School 

Mrs. Dorothy Cleverdon Teacher-Education, Summer Play Schools 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOLt 



Name Year Address College 

Alexander, Evelyn '58 Little Neck, N. Y. Mary Washington College 

Allonen, Taina '58 New York, N. Y. Hunter College 

Andrews, Nancy J '57 Carlstadt, N. J. Springfield College 

Ayers, Marie E '58 Taylor, Pa. Penn State University 

Beal, Barbara A '58 Elmer, N. J. Ursinus College 

Beckley, Tozia A '58 Nanticoke, Pa. Eucknell University 

Beeler, Paulene A '56 Fort Wayne, Ind. Indiana University 

Bellville, Elaine Ramage . . '56 New York, N. Y. Keuka College 

Berkson, Gail '56 Bayside, N. Y. St. Lawrence University 

Bernhardt, Ruth '56 Yeadon, Pa. Temple University ^ 

Birchenall, Joan '56 Morrisville, Pa. St. Mary's College 

Bloch, Ursula M '56 Larchmont, N. Y. Cedar Crest College 

Bogacz, Irene W '58 Jersey City, N. J. St. Elizabeth College 

Bolton, Barbara '56 Arlington, Mass. Simmons College 

Borden, Jean S '57 Westlake, Ohio Maryville College 

Borst, Evelyn L '57 Brooktondale, N. Y. Green Mountain Jr. College 

Bowman, Joann P '57 Douglaston, N. Y. University of Kansas 

Brink, Nancy M '57 Dunmore, Pa. Houghton College 

Brown, Mary D '56 Port Chester, N. Y. New York University 

Browne, Frances E '58 Roslyn, N. Y. Albertus Magnus College 

Bruns, Marjorie R '56 St. Thomas, V. I. Hope College 

Bruns, Marlene D '56 St. Thomas, V. I. Hope College 

Buckley, Irene '56 New York, N. Y. Hunter College 

Burke, Sarah J '57 Mahanoy City, Pa. Hood College 

Burton, Carol '58 Montclair, N. J. Wells College 

Buttrick, Anne '56 Concord, Mass. Mt. Holyoke College 

Cain, Ellen A '57 Holyoke, Mass. University of Mass. 

Calnero, Barbara '57 Utica, N. Y. Utica College 

Campion, Muriel O '56 Bristol, Pa. Temple University 

Casalini, Yohanna '57 Long Island City, N. Y. Hunter College 

Gasman, Sandra W '57 Pelham, N. Y. Swarthmore College 

Chamberlin, Priscilla R. . . . '57 Croton Falls, N. Y. Colby College 

Chapin, Marybelle Carruth . '56 Little Neck, N. Y. Bates College 

Chetto, Adrienne R '58 New York, N. Y. Hunter College 

Cinquemani, Grace '56 St. Albans, N. Y. Queens College 

Cooley, Harriet '56 Pleasantville, N. Y, Simmons College 

Cornell, Carol L '56 Endicott, N. Y. West Virginia Wesleyan Coll. 

Costantin, Geralyn S '57 Clifton, N. J. Centenary Jr. College 

Daggett, Sue '57 University Heights, Ohio Carleton College 

Daldy, Nora K '58 Drexel Hill, Pa. Cornell University 

Dannaker, Claire '56 Broomall, Pa. Gettysburg College 

Deffigos, Mary '58 Boonton, N. J. Douglass College 

DeHaas, Ruth M '58 Maplewood, N. J. University of New Hampshire 

Dehan, Elaine E '56 Littleneck, N. Y. College of New Rochelle 

DeLucia, Louise '56 New York, N. Y. City College 

Denis, Shelby M '57 Springfield, N. J. Mary Washington College 

f Including those graduating in September, 1956, but not those entering at that time. 

49 



50 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name Year Address 

DePaola, Anita V '58 New York, N. Y. 

Derk, Anne M '58 Elkins Park, Pa. 

Dole, Charlotte M '58 Harlowton, Mont. 

Doppel, Jane M '58 West Point, Pa. 

Doric, Jeanne B '58 Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Douglas, Lynne L '58 Pelham, N. Y. 

Drummond, Dorothy '58 Clarksville, Ark. 

Dudley, Virginia '56 Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Duerr, Joan P '57 Jamaica, N. Y. 

Durkin, Mary Lu '56 Montclair, N. J. 

Earle, Alice F '57 Worcester, Mass. 

Edgar, Joyce E '57 Poughkeepsie. N. Y. 

Eisman, Roberta G '58 New York, N. Y. 

Elder, Margaret '58 New York, N. Y. 

Eyerman, Jean G '58 Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Ferrin, Miriam M '58 Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Finegan, Elizabeth A '58 Jermyn, Pa. 

Finn, Patricia '56 Hempstead, N. Y. 

Follett, Jane V. A '58 Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Frost, Betty J '57 ^Vilmington, Del. 

Gaffney, Wanda Mohr '56 Jackson, Minn. 

Gillespie, Mary S '58 Waban, Mass. 

Giobbe, Carol A '58 1 orrington. Conn. 

Gordon, Carolee '57 Cheshire, Conn. 

Graham, Marcia H '58 Fairfield, Conn. 

Grantham, Priscilla Dudley '56 Lyons, N. Y. 

Gruenewald, Barbara '56 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Haertl, Barbara '58 Framingham, Mass. 

Hahn, Johanne C '58 Salt Point, N. Y. 

Flaight, Barbara '56 Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Hall, Gail '57 Staten Island, N. Y. 

Hamilton, Shirley M '56 Floral Park, N. Y. 

Happich, Elizabeth A '56 Maplewood, N.J. 

Hayes, Joan K '57 Greenfield, Mass. 

Heggie, Anne T '57 Glen Head, N. Y. 

Heldmann, Marlene A '58 Staten Island, N. Y. 

Henry, Elspeth G '57 Linden, N. J. 

Hering, Ellen '58 Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hildreth, Joan L '57 Pottsville, Pa. 

Hippensteel, Patricia A. . . . '57 Shippensburg, Pa. 

Flitchcock, Katherine A. . . . '57 White Plains, N. Y. 

Hogan, Carol M '57 New York, N. Y. 

Hohloch, Faith J '56 Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Horn, Norma E '56 Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Horton, Johanna E '56 Clifford, Pa. 

Howard, Mary Louise '56 New Orleans, La. 

Howland, Charity A '58 Andover, N. Y. 

Flunter, Carol D '58 Douglaston, N. Y. 

Hutt, Dorothy A '57 Watertown, N. Y. 

Iley, Jan '56 Dunedin, Fla. 

Ingley, Margaret B '57 Port Washington, N. Y. 

Ives, Judith A '56 New Haven, Conn. 

Jackson, Elizabeth C '57 Mamaroneck, N. Y. 



College 
College of New Rochelle 
Ursinus College 
University of Redlands 
Cornell University 
St. John's University 
Bradford Jr. College 
AV^'ooster College 
Cornell University 
Keuka College 
Chestnut Hill College 
Colby College 
Cornell University 
University of Rochester 
Hunter College 
Penn State University 
Lindenwood College 
Marywood College 
Hofstra College 
Bradford Jr. College 
Bradford Jr. College 
Macalester College 
Denison University 
College of New Rochelle 
Skidmore College 
Buckncll University 
Cornell University 
Brooklyn College 
University of Mass. 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Notre Dame College 
Mary Washington College 
Ohio University 
Springfield College 
Adelphi College 
College of New Rochelle 
Douglass College 
Northwestern University 
Hood College 
Houghton College 
DePauw University 
Hunter College 
University of Maine 
Cornell University 
Penn State University 
Tulane University 
Cornell University 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Roberts Wesleyan College 
Rollins College 
Bates College 
Albion College 
DePauw University 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL 



51 



Name Year A ddress 

Jackson, Phyllis '58 Dedham, Mass. 

Johnson, Paula J '56 Memphis, Tenn. 

Keep, Eleanor R '58 North East, Pa. 

Kelly, Noreen A '57 Brewer, Maine 

King, Karen '57 New York, N. Y. 

Kleinert, Patricia A '58 Greenwich, Conn. 

Knight, Katherine A '58 Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

Lamont, Jane G '57 Fullerton, Pa. 

Leidenberg, Norma J '56 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Leland, Joan '57 Florence, Mass. 

Levinsky, Sandra '57 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Light, Cynthia A '58 Signal Mountain, Tenn. 

Light, Frances C '56 Hummelstown, Pa. 

Littell, Janice M '58 Levittown, N. Y. 

Loewi, Mary J '58 Milwaukee, Wis. 

Long, Diane M '57 Bethesda, Md. 

Lord, Rae V '56 Binghamton, N. Y. 

Lovre, Carmen N '58 Silver Spring, Md. 

Luciano, Dolores A '57 Endicott, N. Y. 

Lyman, Carol P '57 Norwich, Conn. 

Mager, Helen M '56 Linden, N. J. 

Mangan, Helen M '58 Hamden, Conn. 

Manning, Marilyn F '56 Allentown, Pa. 

Marsden, Marion H '58 Oswego, N. Y. 

Marshall, Vanessa A '58 Ocean City, N. J. 

McCabe, Eleanor '58 St. Albans, N. Y. 

McConaughy, Lillian C. . . . '56 Staten Island, N. Y. 

McEldowney, Margaret R. . '56 Washington, D. C. 

McGrath, Lois A '58 Staten Island, N. Y. 

McMaster, Charmaine J. . . . '57 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

McMullen, Elizabeth E. . . . '58 Hershey, Pa. 

Meaden, Georgia E '56 Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Merrill, Joan '58 Pembroke, N. H. 

Messmer, Barbara C '56 Ardmore, Pa. 

Miller, Frances M '58 New York, N. Y. 

Miller, Ruth E '58 VandaHa, 111. 

Miller, Sandra '57 Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Millett, June E '58 Eastport, Maine 

Morse, Constance J '58 Tully, N. Y. 

Morton, Margaret T '58 Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Mott, Mary A '58 Nyack, N. Y. 

Muench, Julie H '58 Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Muirhead, Margaret M. . . . '57 Delmar, N. Y. 

Mullin, Magdalene M '57 Woodside, N. Y. 

Murtha, Nancy J '56 Bronxville, N. Y. 

Noyce, Judith C '58 White Plains, N. Y. 

Oehrlein, Marianne '56 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Osier, Alice L '58 Medomak, Maine 

Patterson, Anne K *56 Columbus, Ohio 

Petroff, Frances L '57 Towaco, N. J. 

Phillips, Nancy A '57 Newland, N. C. 



College 
Bradford Jr. College 
Vanderbilt University 
Wooster College 
University of Maine 
Cornell University 
University of Michigan 
Paul Smith's College 
Penn State University 
Gettysburg College 
University of Mass. 
Brooklyn College 
Sarah Lawrence College 
Hershey Jr. College 
Cornell University 
Centenary Jr. College 
Tulane University 
St. Lawrence University 
Cornell University 
Keuka College 
Cornell University 
Douglass College 
University of Maine 
Cedar Crest College 
Marywood College 
Douglass College 
Hunter College 
Wheaton College 
Bennett Jr. College 
Wells College 
Brooklyn College 
Hershey Jr. College 
Stephens College 
New England College 
Rosemont College 
Cornell University 
Washington University 
Bucknell University 
University of Maine 
Elmira College 
Marymount College 
Endicott Jr. College 
Colby Jr. College 
Cornell University 
St. Joseph's College for 

Women 
College of New Rochelle 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
University of Maine 
University of Michigan 
Drew University 
Woman's College of the 

University of North Carolina 



52 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



'Name Year 
Plimpton, Deborah '58 

Pollard, Joyce E '58 

Quigley, Jean M '57 

Richards, Gloria A '57 

Rizzo, Helene A '58 

Roehner, Gwen M '56 

Rogge, Renee '57 

Rothe, Barbara A '57 

Rudolph, Patricia D '57 

Rusk, Mary Alice '57 

Schaefer, Anna-Maria '56 

Scheer, Anne S '57 

Schlosser, Adele P '57 

Schmid, Rose-Marie '56 

Shaw, Janet M '56 

Shields, Margaret A '56 

Shigo, Elizabeth A '57 

Singh, Leila '58 

Skehan, Jerrie A '58 

Slysz, Marianne S '58 

Spain, Rita E '58 

Spalteholz, Clara M '56 

Stoop, Nancy J '57 

Straumanis, Mara '56 

Sugimoto, Madeleine S '58 

Swan, Charlotte A '58 

Taggart, Eleanor '57 

Taksen, Carolyn R '58 

Tauber, Lenore M '57 

Taylor, Edith '56 

Taylor, Jean A '58 

Timmerman, Felicia '58 

Ting, Emily Y-M '57 

Triebe, Christine B '56 

Tychsen, Evelyn M '58 

Unkelbach, Joan '56 

Urquhart, Audrey L '56 

von Geldern, Margaret .... '56 

Ward, Arline D '58 

Warren, Delight D '57 

Watkins, Marylou '58 

Webster, Barbara A '58 

Werkheiser, Vilma K '57 

Westcott, Gail A '58 

Wilmarth, Jeanne E '57 

Wolf, Carol A '58 

Woods, Angela L '57 

Wosniok, Theodora B '56 

Young, Hester B '58 

Young, Nan '58 

Zettle, Shirlee A '56 



Address 
Framingham Centre, 

Mass. 
Old Greenwich, Conn. 
Northport, N. Y. 
East Orange, N. J. 
Clifton, N. J. 
Stamford, Conn. 
Hicksville, N. Y. 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Floral Park, N. Y. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
Oyster Bay, N. Y. 
New Canaan, Conn. 
New York, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Wayne, Pa. 
Gloversville, N. Y. 
Bloomfield, N.J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Jenkintown, Pa. 
New Britain, Conn. 
Wilson, N. C. 

Newark, N. Y. 
Queens Village, N. Y. 
Rolla, Missouri 
New York, N. Y. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Waverly, N. Y. 
Highland Park, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Shanghai, China 
Kingsport,Tenn. 
East Hartford, Conn. 
Mattituck, N. Y. 
East Walpole, Mass. 
Chatham, N.J. 
Fairfield, Conn. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Great River, N. Y. 
Maplewood, N. J. 
Easton, Pa. 
Westwood, N. J. 
Bayville, N. Y. 
Babylon, N. Y. 
Bloomfield, N.J. 
Rye, N. Y. 
West Nyack, N. Y. 
West Orange, N. J. 
Emmaus, Pa. 



College 
Western Reserve University ] 

Pembroke College 
Hofstra College 
Upsala College 
Caldwell College 
St. Lawrence University 
Hofstra College 
Wells College 
Hofstra College 
Denison University 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Colby College 
Vassar College 
Cornell University 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
Upsala College 
Hunter College 
Hood College 
College of New Rochellc 
Woman's College of the 

University of North Carol 
Concordia Collegiate Inst. 
Cornell University 
Cottey Jr. College 
Himter College 
University of Maine 
Adelphi College 
Cornell University 
Adelphi College 
Cornell University 
Douglass College 
Smith College 
Bradley University 
Cornell University 
Wheaton College 
Cornell University 
University of Mass. 
Drew University 
Moravian College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cedar Crest College 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
University of Nebraska 
College of St. Elizabeth 
Douglass College 
Cornell University 
Hood College 
Cedar Crest College 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the School as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible background 
preparatory to entering the School o£ Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 



Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information which 
will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing school 
entrance. 



Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 



Date diploma received or expected 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 
19.... 



Please send me an application blank 

(See page 12 regarding when to request, and check if desired.) 



INDEX 



Absences, 16 

Accreditation of the School, 5 

Activities, 16; Nurses Residence, 16; 
Alumnae Association, 18; recreation, 
16; marriage and residence, 18; school 
government, 17; counseling services, 
18 

Activities and Relationships ^vithin the 
hospital unit, 23, 32 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
36-48 

Admission, 10; general requirements, 
10; selection of a college, 10; educa- 
tion requirements. 11; age and health, 
13; application, 13; Cornell advisory 

I committee on pre-nursing, 38 
Alumnae Association, 18, 38 
^Anatomy, 20, 29 

[Application for admission, 13, 53 
Assistant professors, 40 
[Assistants in instruction, 44-45 
I Associate professors, 39 
V'^sociated with the faculty, 44-48 

Basic nursing progiam, 19; professional 

curriculum, 19 
Biochemistry, 20, 29 
Biological and physical sciences, 29 

Calendar, 3 
•Clinical Nursing, Introduction to, 20, 31 

Clinics, 8-10 

College, Selection of, 10 

Committee for Scholarships, 27, 38 
1 Community and the nurse, 20, 29 
i Contents, 2 

•Core Course in Operating Room, Surgi- 
cal and Out-Patient Nursing, 21, 31 

Cornell University, 6; degree, 15; ad- 
visory committee on pre-nursing stu- 
dents, 38; Medical College faculty, 43 

Council of the School, 36 

Counseling services, 18 

Courses, description of, 29-35 



Curriculum, professional, 19; Unit I, 20; 
Unit II, 20; Unit III, 22; Unit IV, 23 

Degree, 15 

Description of courses, 29-35 

Development of Behavior in Children, 
22,34 

Diet Therapy, 21, 22, 32, 33 

Diploma, 15 

Division of Child Development, Depart- 
ment of Pediatrics, 22, 48 

Early giowth and development, 20, 29 
Educational requisites, 11-12 
Elective Experience, 23, 32 
Emeritus professors, 40 
Executive faculty, 37 
Expenses, 24 

Facilities for instruction, 8-10 

Faculty, 39-43; associated with, 44-48; 
committees of, 37 

Faculty instructors, 40-43 

Family and Community Health, 22, 30 

Fees and expenses, 24; method of pay- 
ment, 25; maintenance, 26 

Financial aid, 26-28 

Fundamentals of Nursing and allied 
courses, 20, 31; Orientation, 20, 31 

Graduation, 14-15; degree and diploma, 

15 
Gynecological nursing, 21, 34 

Head nurses, 47 
Health service, 15-16 
History of School, 6-7 
Historical Backgrounds of Nursing, 21, 
30 

Introduction to Clinical Nursing. 20, 31 

Joint Administrative Board, 36 

Lecturers, 46 
Libraries, 8 



55 



56 



INDEX 



Loan Fund, 27 

Long Term Illness, 22, 32 

Maintenance, 26 

Marriage, 18 

Maternity Nursing, 21, 34 

Mathematics related to drugs, 20, 31 

Medical Nursing, 21, 33 

Microbiology, 20, 29 



Professors, 39, 43 

Program, basic nursing, 19 

Promotion and graduation, 14-15; De- 
gree, Diploma, 15 

Psychiatric Nursing, 22, 34, 35 

Psychosocial and cultural aspects of 
nursing, 20, 29 

Public health affiliations, 10, 22, 48 

Public Health Nursing, 10, 22, 30 



Neurological nursing, 21, 33 

New York Hospital, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; nursing 
supervisors, 46; head nurses, 47; staff, 
46-48 

Nurses Residence, 8, 16 

Nursing, Fundamentals of — and allied 
courses, 20, 31 

Nutrition, 20; department of, 48; Nutri- 
tion and Diet Therapy, 32, 33 

Obstetric (Maternity) Nursing, 21, 34 
Officers of administration, 37 
Operating Room Nursing, 21, 33, 34; 

Core Course, 21, 31 
Orientation, 20, 31 
Orthopedic Nursing, 22, 32 
Out-Patient Department, 9, 20 
Out-Patient Nursing, 21, 30, 31; Core 

Course, 21, 31 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 9 
Pediatric Nursing, 22, 34 
Pharmacology, 21, 31 
Physical Education, 20, 21, 22, 35 
Physiology, 20, 29 

Professional Problems I, 21, 30; Profes- 
sional Problems II, 23, 30 



Recreational facilities, 16-17 
Registration, State, 5 
Rehabilitation (see Long Term), 32 

Scholarships, 26-28 

School government, 17 

School of Nursing, administrative offi- 
cers, 37; faculty committees, 37 

Senior Experience, 23, 32 

Social Sciences, 29 

Social Service Departments, 48 

State registration, 5 

Student life and activities, 16-18 

Students now in School, 49-52 

Supervisors, nursing, 46 

Surgical Nursing, 21, 33; Core Course, 
21,31 

Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuition, 24 

Uniforms, 24, 26 
Urological Nursing, 22, 33 

Vacations, 16 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York, 10, 
22,49 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1957-1958 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF 
:ORNELL UNIVERSITY- NEW YORK HOSPITAI 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



TERM DATES 1957-1958 

Sept. 23, 1957 - Dec. 15,1957 

Dec. 16, 1957 - March 9, 1958 

March 10, 1958 - June 1, 1958 

June 2, 1958 -Sept. 21,1958 

Sept. 22, 1958 -Dec. 14,1958 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
situated in New York City between York Avenue and the East 
River from 68th to 71st Streets, is part of The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center. 

The office of the Dean is on the second floor of the Nurses Resi- 
dence, 1320 York Avenue, at the corner of 70th Street. This may be 
reached by taking the 65th Street crosstown bus (M-7) east-bound, 
to York Avenue and 70th Street. These buses connect with all north 
and south bound transit lines. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two weeks 
throughout the calendar year. Volume 49. Number 3. July 30, 1957. 
Second-class mail privileges authorized at the post office at Ithaca, 
New York, December 14, 1916, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

A list of the Announcements will be found on the inside back cover. 



Cornell University - New York Hospital 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1957-1958 

1320 YORK AVENUE, NEW YORK 21. N.Y. 



CONTENTS 



Calendar o 

The Preparation of Today's Professional Nurse . . 4 

Accreditation 5 

State Registration for Graduates 5 

History -. 5 

Facilities for Instruction 7 

Admission .'.... 10 

Promotion and Graduation 18 

Health Service 14 

Vacations and Absences 15 

Student Life and Activities 15 

Basic Nursing Program 18 

Fees and Expenses 23 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 25 

Descri]:)tion of Coinses 28 

Administration 34 

Faculty 37 

Associated with the Facidty 42 

Students in the School 47 

Index 53 



CALENDAR 



1957 
Sept. II S(ilii}({(iy Rci^isiralion Day 

Oct. 11 I)i(l(iy Holiday lor C;()liniil)us l)a\ (loi all students ex 

ccpt Fresh men)* 

Nov. 2H Thursday Holiday: thanksgiving Day 

Nov. 29 i'yi(l(i\ Holiday: Freshmen only* 

Dec. 21 Sdlioddy C^hristmas recess begins lor Freshmen students 

Dec. 25 l\'e(hicsd(iy Holiday: Christmas Day 

1958 

fan. 1 Wednesday Holidax : New Year's Day 

|an. 5 Sunday Last day ol Christmas recess lor Freshmen 

Fel). 21 Friday Holiday tor Washington's Birthday 

Mav oO Friday Holiday: Memorial Day 

(une 1 Wednesday C^ommencement Day 

luly 1 I'ridax Holiday: Inde{)endence Day 

I Sept. 1 Monday Floliday: Labor Day 

Sej)t. I.H Saturday Registration Day 

Oct. Li Monday Holiday tor Columbus Day 

Nov. 27 Thursday Holiday: I'hanksgiving Day 

Dec. 20 Saturday Christmas recess begins for Freshmen students 

Dec. 25 Thursday Holidax: Christmas Day 

1959 

'fan. 1 Thursday Holiday: New Year's Day 

Jan. 4 Sunday Last day ot Christmas recess lor Freslnnen 

Feb. 2.1 Monday Holiday tor ^Vashington's Birthday 

Mav 29 Friday Holiday for Memorial Dav 

julv 3 Friday Holiday for Independence Day 

* Freshmen will receive this holiday oti Iridav. Nov. 29. 1957. 



THE PREPARATION OF TODAY'S 
PROFESSIONAL NURSE 



Nursing represents one o£ the vital lorces tor health in today's society. 
The nursing needs of people range from the simplest to the most com- 
plex. Persons with widely varying preparation may help to meet these 
needs, but the professional nurse is the key person in the total picture of 
nursing service. This service includes promotion of health, prevention 
of disease, and treatment of sickness; it should reach individuals in the 
hospital, the home, the school, and on the job. 

The professional nurse who is to function in the pivotal position in 
this total service must have a preparation which is different from that 
usually offered by nursing schools in the first half of this century. The 
rapid increase in scientific knowledge and the broadened scope of 
therapy alone would make this essential. Added to this are the special 
problems growing out of the wider spectrum of ages to be cared for in a 
period when neither the newborn nor the aged need be barred from the 
benefits of medical science. The modern concept of rehabilitation which 
accepts as an aim optimum recovery for each person demands from the 
nurse not only factual knowledge based on the various sciences but 
trained insight to recognize possibilities, and skill in interpreting to her 
patient the best ways to realize them. 

The emerging consciousness of the contribution which the behavioral 
sciences can make to the field of health has opened another area of com- 
petence in which the nurse must be prepared. These sciences offer re- 
sources essential in helping her work effectively not only with patients 
but with professional practitioners in related fields, and with less well- 
prepared assistants whom she must guide in nursing care. This responsi- 
bility of teaching and directing auxiliary personnel is inherent in the 
work of every professional nurse today, though unknown only a few 
years ago. 

The purpose of this program is to prepare a practitioner who, imme- 
diately upon graduation, can, with guidance, function in any beginning 
position in professional nursing; who is able to help in meeting one of 
today's greatest health problems, that of finding new and better ways of 
providing good nursing care to meet an expanding need; who can pro- 
ceed without loss of time or credit should she desire to prepare herself 
for teaching, administration or research, fields in which there is acute 
need; whose general education is sufficiently broad to make her an effec- 
tive member of society. 



ACCREDITATION 

The School is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing 
(Accrediting Service) and is one of thirty-six schools accredited as pre- 
paring for beginning public health nurse positions as well as for pos- 
itions in the other fields. This is an important factor in the employment 
status of graduates of the school not only in positions which are specifi- 
cally public health but in others as well, since the accreditation is on the 
basis of the total program. 



STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 

Graduates who are citizens or who have legally declared intention of 
becoming citizens are eligible for admission to the examination for licen- 
sure administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are ex- 
pected to take the first examination given after completion of the nursing 
course. Satisfactory completion of this examination classifies the graduate 
of the School as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in the State of New York. If 
citizenship is not completed within seven years from the declaration 
of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

Graduates of the School are urged to take State Board examinations 
in New York State. Those wishing to practice elsewhere may then apply 
for registration either by reciprocity or by examination, depending on 
the laws of the particular state. 



HISTORY 

The Cornell University— New York Hospital School of Nursing was 
established as a School in Cornell University in 1942, on the 65th an- 
niversary of the founding of The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
one of the earliest nursing schools in the country. The School is part of 
The New York Hospital— Cornell Medical Center which includes also 
the Cornell University Medical College and the various adjoining build- 
ings of The New York Hospital, extending from 68th to 71st Street on 
the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society of the New York 
Hospital and Cornell University, committed to a four-fold purpose in 
(1) care of the sick, providing the same wisdom and skill to rich and poor. 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

(2) education of doctors and nurses, research workers, technicians and 
others who will work in the field of medical science; (3) research to ex- 
tend the boundaries of knowledge in the health fields; (4) promotion of 
public health through the development of preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second oldest voluntary hospital in this 
country, its Royal Charter having been granted in 1771, in the reign of 
King George III. The first patients were soldiers wounded in the Revolu- 
tionary War. At that time the Hospital was located on the lower end of 
Manhattan, the only part of the City then settled, and on early maps the 
location was designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Early in its history the Hospital pioneered in introducing vaccination 
for smallpox for the first time in America, in introducing temperature 
charts now standard practice in hospitals, in the use of anesthetics, and 
in caring for the mentally ill as sick persons needing medical care rather 
than as outcasts fit only for prison or the almshouse. Today the Center 
continues to pioneer in significant new programs including studies in 
psychosomatic medicine, in planning for and teaching comprehensive 
medical care, research to ascertain the causes of alcoholism, establish- 
ment of an ambulatory transfusion clinic, and in bringing rehabilitation 
into all medical care. 

Cornell University with its campus in Ithaca, New York, received its 
charter in 1865, nearly 100 years after the Hospital had been chartered. 

Three circumstances contributed to the founding of the University in 
the eventful years that marked the close of the Civil War. In the first 
place, Ezra Cornell, a citizen of Ithaca, had come into a large fortune 
from his holdings in the newly formed Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany and had devoted a great deal of thought to the good that might be 
done by giving his wealth to education. A second circumstance was the 
fact that the State of New York had received a substantial land grant, 
under the Morrill Act of 1862, for the support of colleges teaching 
agriculture and the mechanical arts. The third circumstance was that 
Mr. Cornell had as a colleague in the state legislature of 1864-1865 a 
young senator named Andrew D. White, later to become the first presi- 
dent of the University, who had the vision of preserving the state's land 
grant intact for a single great institution which should teach not only 
agriculture and the mechanical arts but the humanities and the sciences 
as well. 

The Medical College and the School of Nursing are the two schools 
of the University which are located in New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over 100 years before a school 
for the training of nurses was opened. There had been early steps taken, 
however, to improve the care given to patients and even in 1799, Dr. 
Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician had organized a 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 7 

series of lectures combined with a course of practical instruction in the 
wards which was given to the women who were engaged by the Hospital 
at that time as "watchers" and "nurses." Although the theoretical con- 
tent was meager and the practical instruction not systematically planned, 
these classes focused attention on the fact that women who had some 
preparation for their work gave better care than those without instruc- 
tion. When in 1873 the first training school in this country on the 
Nightingale pattern was opened at Bellevue Hospital, the Governors 
of The Society of the New York Hospital contributed to its support. 
Four years later, in 1877, when the Hospital moved to new buildings, 
The New York Hospital Training School for Nurses was opened in 
quarters which were considered to have all the modern improvements of 
the times. The School moved to the present location when the present 
Medical Center was opened in 1932. 

The health needs of the community and country have been the guid- 
ing force in the development of the School which has strengthened its 
program to keep pace with these needs. Today the work of the profes- 
sional nurse requires a great deal more of her than in the past and in 
recognition of this, the University program was established in 1942. 
Since 1946, all students admitted to the School have been in the degree 
program and the School is now one of the largest collegiate schools of 
nursing in the country. An endowment fund for the School was begun 
in 1951 which as it grows will further safeguard the progress of the 
School for future development. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the Nursing 
School. These include class and conference rooms, libraries, laboratories 
and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching unit on the second 
and ninth floors of the Nurses Residence while others are provided in 
The New York Hospital, the Hospital for Special Surgery and in the 
Cornell University Medical College. 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all the 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various agencies of the 
city and the surrounding community. 

LIBRARIES 

The library of the School contains a wide selection of materials per- 
tinent to nursing and related fields, and includes important medical 



8 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

and nursing periodicals, both current and in reference sets of bound 
volumes. There are additional small collections in each department near 
the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors. The library is 
under the direction of a committee of the faculty, and in charge of a 
professional librarian. The facilities of the Medical College Library are 
also readily accessible and make valuable supplementary materials avail- 
able to both the students and faculty of the Nursing School. In addition, 
the broad resources of the New York Public Library, the National Health 
Library, and many other special libraries in the city may be called upon 
whenever needed. ■ 

CLINICAL SERVICES 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital and the Hospital 
for Special Surgery (Orthopedic) provide unusual opportunity for the i 
care and study of patients. The New York Hospital is comprised of five \ 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided 
not only with facilities adequate in every way for the care of both in- 
patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching and for 
the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized clinical serv- 
ices are therefore available which are seldom found within a single 
organization. The Hospital has a capacity of 1,207 beds and annually 
approximately 30,000 patients are hospitalized and 40,000 treated as 
out-patients. The conduct of research in all clinical departments gives 
the student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the 
part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects. 
Authenticity of the findings in many studies depends to no small degree 
on the accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to general 
medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of 
tuberculosis, neurology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and throat 
disorders, plastic and neuro-surgery, ophthalmology, and a fracture 
service. The Lying-in Hospital has a capacity of 206 adults and 102 new- 
borns and provides for obstetric and gynecologic patients. Each year 
approximately 4,000 babies are born in this Hospital. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 96 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. Facili- 
ties for the recreation of convalescent children and the services of an 
occupational therapist offer opportunities for the nursing student to 
study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick chil- 
dren. All students have Nursery School experience. Here the student 
works with and observes the development of the well child, and is thus 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 9 

better able to evaluate deviations in behavior which may accompany 
illness. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity of 
108 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational and 
recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of psychiatric 
patients. The close association between the psychiatric, medical and 
nursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a con- 
sultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the relationship 
between mental and physical illness throughout her experience in the 
Hospital. 

The Out-Patient Department with its 83 clinics provides opportunity 
for the study of a large number of patients who come for general health 
supervision, diagnosis of disease and for treatment of disease that can 
be conducted on an ambulatory basis. Each year more than 250,000 pa- 
tient visits are made to this Department. 

Students assist in diagnostic tests, in treatments and in teaching pa- 
tients so that care without hospitalization can be effective. Arrangements 
for continuity of care through use of referrals to public health nursing 
agencies are an essential part of clinic experience. Opportunity is pro- 
vided for participation in the teaching of expectant parents through 
special classes and individual conferences and for study of the family 
approach to health maintenance and care of children. 

The Hospital for Special Surgery provides care and carries out research 
and teaching related to the needs of patients with orthopedic and rheu- 
matic diseases. It has a capacity of 170 beds and 55,000 visits are made 
annually by patients who are being treated in the many special clinics 
of the Out-Patient Department. Nursing students have an opportunity 
to participate in the care of patients of all ages who are affected by a wide 
range of problems. 

COOPERATING COMMUNITY AGENCIES 

Experience is provided in family health counseling, bedside nursing, 
and in the appropriate use of community agencies through cooperation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York and the Visiting Nurse 
Association of Brooklyn. These agencies provide generalized family 
health services for patients in their homes. 

Immediately after graduation, a short, additional experience in public 
health nursing in an official agency may be available to a limited number 
on a student basis, through arrangements with the New York State 
Department of Health. Students with good scholastic records and a 
definite interest in public health nursing as a career are given preference 
among those who request this experience. 



10 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Members of the staff of the New York City Department of Health plan 
with the faculty of the School for appropriate ways to contribute to the 
student program. The Kips Bay Yorkville Health Center serves the dis- 
trict in which the School of Nursing is located. It affords students an 
opportunity to observe the relationship between the New York City 
Department of Health and The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center. 



ADMISSION 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF REQUIREMENTS 

Nursing requires women of integrity and intelligence who have a deep 
interest in public service. Candidates are selected whose credentials in- 
dicate high rank in health, scholarship, maturity, ability to work with 
people, and who give evidence of personal fitness for nursing. A mini- 
mum of two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive of Physical 
Education) is required for admission. 

SELECTION OF A COLLEGE FOR THE FIRST TWO YEARS 

To meet the requirement of two years of college for admission, a very ^ 
wide choice of colleges is available as the content of these two years is 
general liberal arts and may be taken in any university, college, or junior 
college accredited by one of the regional associations of colleges and 
secondary schools. Applicants may therefore take the first two years at 
any one of a great many colleges throughout the country or in one of 
the colleges of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The work of the 
first two years required for admission to this School contains no nursing 
or "pre-nursing" courses and, therefore, selection of a college in which 
to take the first two years is NOT dependent upon its offering a pre- 
nursing program. 

Help in the selection of a college may be obtained by referring to the 
list of "Students in the School" which appears at the back of our School 
of Nursing bulletin as this list indicates the colleges from which students 
now in the School of Nursing have transferred. The list is, however, not 
a complete list of the colleges from which students may transfer. 

In selecting a college and registering for the courses of your first two 
years, read carefully the section below on "Educational Requirements 
for Admission." 



ADMISSION 11 

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Within the two-year liberal arts program of the first two college years 
required for admission, only 15 credits are in specified subjects as 
follows: 

Required: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Recommended: 



Students are urged to obtain a course in sociology or social anthro- 
pology. Other subjects which are especially helpful but in which there 
is no specified requirement are: 

English, Literature, Human Relations, History. 
Desirable: 



Subjects next in importance depending upon the special interest and 
abilities of the student and the courses available are: 

Languages (may be of particular usefulness with patients and also 
for the many opportunities in international work and in ad- 
vanced study) 

Economics, Physics 

Art, Music 

Additional courses in physical or biological sciences (for students 
taking more than 60 credits) 

However not more than 12 hours of biological science can be 
accepted toward meeting the 60 credit hours required for 
admission. 

The program in the School of Nursing requires the student to have 
a good background in English composition, communications skills, and 
use of the library. Should a student prove markedly deficient in com- 
munication skills she may be required to strengthen her background by 
taking courses at a nearby university. Courses which are not accepted 
as fulfilling the 6-hour credit requirements in biological sciences are 
human anatomy, physiology, and bacteriology, as these courses are in- 
cluded in the professional program after admission to the School of 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Nursing. In general the principle applies that those courses given within 
the School of Nursing cannot be credited towards meeting admissions 
requirements because there is no allowance within the School of Nurs- 
ing program for electives which can be substituted for courses already 
taken. 

Students on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca should confer 
early with their advisors in the college in which they are registered or 
with the Office of the Dean of Women. Advisors will be glad to assist in 
planning a desirable program. These students as well as students in col- 
leges other than Cornell should, however, communicate with the School 
of Nursing as indicated under "Application for Admission." Each time 
you register for your courses during your first two years, it is suggested 
that you take this bulletin with you and review this section with your 
advisor. Applicants who do not meet in full the specific subject require- 
ments for admission, but who have a good record of two or more years 
of college are encouraged to communicate with the School of Nursing 
for review of their credits and possible assistance in arranging for courses 
which can be taken in summer sessions. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifications, 
there are not definite age limits. In general, however, it has proven de- 
sirable for applicants to be between the ages of 18 and 35 years. The 
results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a dental 
examination must be submitted at the time of application. Vaccination 
against poliomyelitis before admission is strongly urged. Inoculation 
against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox are required of 
ail students. In addition the applicant must have a Schick Test and if 
the reaction is positive must be immunized against diphtheria before 
admission. 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION - 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nursing, 
containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the form at 
the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. Ap- 
plicants for admission should include with their application the appli- 
cation fee. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain psycho- 
metric tests are required before admission. The applicant is asked to 
meet the charge of $7.00 for these tests. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 13 

A personal interview is considered an important part of the applica- 
tion procedure. Effort is made to have the applicant meet with a member 
of the Committee on Admissions at the School in New York. If this is 
not practicable, a conference can often be arranged with an alumna or 
other qualified person living near the applicant's home or college. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants contact the School as early 
as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their programs 
in high school and college to gain the best possible educational back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal application 
should be made during the first term of the first college year if the appli- 
cant plans to enter this school after her second college year. When all 
application forms are received, including the report of the psychometric 
test and a transcript covering the first year of college work, and these 
appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted pending satis- 
factory fulfillment of all remaining requirements. 

A candidate for admission must make a deposit of |25.00 upon notifi- 
cation of this acceptance to the School. This assures that a place will be 
held for her in the entering class. The full amount is credited toward the 
graduation fee. The deposit is not refundable if the applicant does not 
register. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

Each term is 12 weeks in length and the established system of grading is 
a scale of F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. An average of C 
for each term is required for promotion without condition. A grade of C 
is required in the course Fundamentals of Nursing. A grade below C in 
any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average which is less than 
C places a student on condition. This must be removed by the end of the 
next term to insure further promotion. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the judg- 
ment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she can 
complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable period of time. 

An F (Failure) in any subject may necessitate withdrawal from the 
School unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, in 
which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the instruc- 
tor, if the course is available. With faculty approval a similar course may 
be taken at another university in the city, if not available at this School. 



14 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the stu- 
dent to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory to it. 
A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a Pro- 
motion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice, rela- 
tionships with patients and co-workers, and general development are 
factors. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her work 
or who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the qualifica- 
tions which are important for a good nurse may be put on condition or 
asked to withdraw from the School. The School reserves the privilege of 
retaining only those students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy 
the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal suitability for 
nursing. 

Parents or guardians of students are advised when students are placed 
on condition or asked to leave the School. However, in general, the 
School reports only to students. Each student is kept informed of her 
progress through frequent examinations, reports and conferences, and 
every effort is made to provide assistance and guidance which will help 
her to succeed. When it seems advisable a student may be asked to with- 
draw from the program without having been on condition. 

DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University. In order to qualify for the degree, the student must maintain 
a cumulative average of C for the total program, and must have com- 
pleted satisfactorily all of the theory and practice outlined in this 
Announcement or required by decision of the faculty. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Good health is of the utmost importance and students have readily 
available to them a well-organized health service which is maintained in 
cooperation with the health service of the Center. Provision is also made 
for hospital care. 

Upon admission to the School a physical examination by the school 
physician and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray is 
required every six months, and a physical examination during each 



J 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 15 

school year. The Mantoux test is given during the first term. Students 
receive dental health service consisting of a series of full-mouth X-rays, 
examination by a dentist, a written diagnosis with suggestions for treat- 
ment, and follow-up supervision. For repair of dental defects, students 
are referred to their own dentists. 

In the event of short-term illness requiring bed care, students are ad- 
mitted to a special floor of The New York Hospital which is maintained 
for this purpose. If more seriously ill, students are cared for on other 
floors of the Hospital within the limits of the Hospital's policy on ad- 
missions and bed usage, and hospitalization up to the amount of eight 
weeks for any one admission is provided. Elective surgery and dental 
work are not included and if not taken care of before admission to the 
School must be arranged during vacations. Expenses for private nurses, 
transfusions and personal items are borne by the student. The School re- 
serves the right to collect all hospitalization benefits available through 
third parties for any period of care coming within the provisions of these 
benefits. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a student's 
health makes it unwise for her to remain in the School, she may be re- 
quired to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any time. 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 

There is a vacation of five weeks in the first year, two weeks of this 
being given at Christmas time. In the second year there is a four-week 
vacation. All vacations are arranged to conform to the requirements of 
the program but usually fall within the Summer months. 

Because of the nature of assignments, a leave of absence usually neces- 
sitates absence for an entire term. As a result of absence, a student may be 
required to re-register for a course of study or a nursing practioe period, 
or she may be transferred to a later class. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence adjacent to the Hospital. Every 
effort has been made in the construction and equipment of the Residence 
to provide for the normal and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are located 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively furnished single 
rooms with running water. Each floor has ample baths, showers, and 
toilet facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoining 
kitchenette for informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch of 
the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

A large auditorium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sun 
roofs, television sets and a hobby room are also available. There are 
pianos for student use. Student activities planned jointly with the 
Cornell University Medical College are a regular part of the recreation 
and include glee club and dramatic productions. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach equip- 
ment and an outdoor grill are available. 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities, a Residence 
Director and a well-qualified instructor in Physical Education are in 
charge. House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is 
made up of representatives of those living in the Residence, of staff mem- 
bers living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for 
friends and relatives at a reasonable charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless in 
music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Committee, 
students,and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities as mem- 
bership in Town Hall Morning Lecture Course, the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, American Museum of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera 
Guild, Institute of Arts and Sciences, and the Student and Professional 
Ticket Service. 

An annual fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports the 
varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," three 
times a year. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The Blue 
Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships for both 
medical and nursing students, the Nurses' Christian Fellowship and the 
Newman Club. Guest speakers and planned forums provide an opportu- 
nity for exchange of thought on many subjects. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 17 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule which 
is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all students. The 
Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, Judicial Coun- 
cil and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on Student Affairs 
acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organization and, with the 
Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty meetings which provide 
for informal discussions of school activities and problems. 

MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one or 
more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater prob- 
lem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course of study, 
freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature is important. 
For this reason it is held to be the responsibility of a student who is con- 
templating marriage during her period in the School to discuss her pro- 
posed plans well in advance with the Dean and to obtain permission to 
remain in the School. 

Under certain conditions, including approval of location near the 
Center, permission to live outside the Residence may be granted to a 
married student provided in the judgment of the School this will not 
interfere with the student's School responsibilities. The faculty record 
their belief that responsibility for maintaining the quality of her work 
and for continuing participation in School activities must be accepted 
by the student. A married applicant if accepted may be asked to live in 
the Residence for at least the first six months. 

Students anticipating marriage are expected to make plans which will 
fit into their regular vacation or school schedule as leave of absence can 
rarely be granted except for an entire term. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The School maintains active counseling services which are available 
to any student who needs assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in her normal work in the School or in con- 
nection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that those 
students who need help on questions of educational program, finances. 



18 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to those mem- 
bers of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in relation to 
the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for any 
student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase of her 
life while in the School of Nursing. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the ten 
alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national profes- 
sional organization of nurses, now known as the American Nurses' Asso- 
ciation. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part of the Cornell 
University Alumni Association. 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 10-12. 

Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry— (including laboratory) .6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts snbjcrts 15 

Total (Pre-Professional) 60 

PROFESSIONAL (32 months). In the School of Nursing. 

General Education Courses 12.5 

Professional Nursing Major 81.0 

Total 93 

Grand Total (required for B.S. in Nursing) 153 

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

In keeping with the philosophy underlying the progiam, the admis- 
sion requirements and the curriculum have been planned to help each 
student attain the following objectives: 

To grow toward becoming a mature individual as evidenced by self- 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 19 

motivation, self-direction, willingness to assume responsibility for her 
own actions, and the development of a set of values worthy of a profes- 
sional person and a good citizen. 

To develop as a person who is sensitive to the needs of others and who 
can establish effective relationships and gain satisfaction and happiness 
from her daily activities. 

To develop a concept of nursing as encompassing not only the care of 
the sick but the prevention of illness and the promotion of health for the 
individual and the community. 

To become professionally competent and technically skilled; capable 
of drawing upon the humanities and the natural and social sciences to 
make reasoned judgments in the practice of her profession. 

To gain appreciation of the place of nursing in today's society' and 
ability to interpret it to others; to see her personal responsibilities as a 
member of the nursing profession. 

The professional curriculum covers a period of thirty-two months. 
In each clinical service, related classes, conferences, and bedside instruc- 
tions are given concurrently with practice and emphasis is placed on 
disease prevention, health instruction and rehabilitation. Throughout 
the program there is emphasis on community nursing, and the student 
has early contact with various agencies assisting with health problems. 
She participates in discussions centering around family health and assists 
in the referral of patients requiring nursing care after hospital discharge. 

The first two terms are devoted primarily to class and laboratory 
assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the pavilions 
of the Hospital. During the next four terms the student is assigned to 
selected clinical areas for theory and practice. These include the Out- 
Patient Department, the Operating and Recovery Rooms, Medicine, 
Surgery and Obstetrics. 

In the Out-Patient Department the student has an opportunity to 
learn something of the medical and nursing needs of patients who are, 
for the most part, carrying on their usual life activities, while being 
treated for some health problem, or learning to live with some physical 
limitation. She is assigned to the clinics of medicine, surgery and pedi- 
atrics. During her in-patient experience on the medical and surgical 
services, she has experience not only on the "general" services but in 
such specialties as ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology and neuro- 
surgery. 

It is not anticipated that the student will develop a high degree of 
technical skill in the operating room. However, through supervised prac- 
tice and observations at the field of operation, and by participating in 
the care of patients in the Recovery Room, the ground work is laid for 



20 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

understanding of the nurse's responsibilities to the patient, not only dur- 
ing the operation, but immediately preceding and following it. 

In the Woman's Clinic, assignments for practice include activities 
related to the newer concepts of maternal and newborn care, embodied 
in such terms as "preparation for parenthood" and "rooming-in." The 
student has experience in the Out-Patient Department, delivery floor, 
nursery and rooming-in units. 

The student has now reached the mid-point of her program and be- 
gins another four-term unit of theory and practice. An eight-week affilia- 
tion with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York or the Visiting Nurse 
Association of Brooklyn, family health agencies, provides an oppor- 
tunity for the student to care for patients in their homes and to teach 
members of the family to give necessary care between visits of the nurse. 

During another period of eight weeks the student considers the spe- 
cial nursing problems related to long-term illness and to rehabilitation. 
At this time her experience includes the care of patients with tuber- 
culosis or with orthopedic conditions. She visits various agencies and 
facilities in the community which offer services to the aged and to those 
with special handicaps such as cerebral palsy. A 12-week assignment to 
the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development includes ex- 
perience in Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant floor and 
the unit for older children. A similar 12- week period is spent in the 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic where the student has an opportunity 
to gain a keen appreciation of the causes of mental and emotional illness, 
of the ways in which such illness may be prevented, and knowledge of 
the newer methods of therapy for its relief. Experience is also provided 
in Diet Therapy and in Urological Nursing. 

In the last term the student is ready to accept almost complete re- 
sponsibility for analyzing and planning to meet the nursing needs of 
selected patients. She returns for twelve weeks to one of the services on 
which she had experience earlier in her program, and with a minimum 
of guidance plans and carries out the care of patients who present com- 
plex nursing problems. She functions as leader of the nursing "team" 
and has charge responsibility on a pavilion for limited periods of the 
day, as well as during the evening or night. 

Within the clinical department where she is having this term of ex- 
perience the student, if she desires, may choose a special nursing prob- 
lem to explore in detail. This would include extensive library investiga- 
tion and may take her into any part of the Medical Center or into other 
community agencies. Related classes and seminars provide an oppor- 
tunity for exchange of ideas and sharing of experiences. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum in 
keeping with the nursing needs of society and the best interests of the 
students and School. 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 
PROGRAM 



21 



First Year (Fall Quarter) 



First Year (Winter Quarter) 



Course 
No. 



Course Title 



120 Orientation 

100 Anatomy; Histology 

101-102 Biochemistry— Physiology 
122 Pharmacology 

106 Early Child Development 

107 The Community and the Nurse 

121 Fundamentals of Nursing 
Physical Education 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
Cr. 


1.5 

3.5 
0.5 
1.0 

1.0 
3.5 




Total 



Course 
No. 



11.0 Total 



Course Title 



105 Psycho-Social and Cultural 

Aspects of Nursing 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
Cr. 



1.5 
2.0 
1.5 

1.0 
1.0 
3.0 




10.0 



First Year (Spring Quarter)* 



First Year (Summer Quarter)* 







Sem. 








Sem. 


Course 


Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title Pract. 


Cr. 


No. 


Course Title 


Pract. 


Cr. 


160 
161 


Principles of Maternity, 
Gynecologic Nursing 
Practice of Maternity, 


5.0 


140 
141 


Principles of Medical 

Nursing 
Practice of Medical 




4.5 


135 


Gynecologic Nursing 12 
Nutrition • 


3.0 
0.5 




Nursing 


12 


3.0 


136 

103 
121 


Diet Therapy 
Microbiology 
Fundamentals of Nursing 
Physical Education 


1.0 

2.0 

1.0 











Total 


12 


12.5 


Total 




12 


7.5 



Second Year (Fall Quarter)* 



Second Year (Winter Quarter)* 









Sem. 








Sem. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title 


Pract. 


Cr. 


No. 


Course Title 


Pract. 


Cr. 


150 


Principles of Surgical 






118 


Principles of Nursing 








Nursing 




1.5 




in O.P.D. 




1.5 


151 


Practice of Surgical 






119 


Practice of Nursing 








Nursing 


12 


3.0 




in O.P.D. 


6 


1.5 


123 


Core Course in O.R., 






154 


Principles of O.R. Nursing 


2.0 




O.P.D. and Surgical 






155 


Practice of O.R. Nursing 6 


1.5 




Nursing 
Historical Backgrounds 




2.0 








2.5 


108 
















of Nursing 




1.0 








1.0 










Total 




12 


7.5 


Total 




12 


10.0 



22 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
PROGRAM (continued) 



Second Year (Spring Quarter) 



Second Year (Summer Quarter)** 



Course 
No. 

170 
171 



Course Title 



Sem. 
Weeks Hrs. 
Pract. Cr. 



Principles of Pediatric 

Nursing 5.0 

Practice of Pediatric 

Nursing 12 3.0 



Total 



12 



Course 
No. 



Course Title 



Sem. 
Weeks Hrs. 
Pract. Cr. 



1 80 Principles of Psychiatric 

Nursing 

181 Practice of Psychiatric 

Nursing 



12 



5.0 



3.0 



8.0 Total 



12 



8.0 



Third Year (Fall Quarter)** Third Year (Winter Q 



uarter)*^ 



Course 
No. 

124 

125 

138 
137 



Course Title 



Sem. 
Weeks Hrs. 
Pract. Cr. 



Principles of Nursing in 

Long-term Illness 2.0 
Practice of Nursing in 

Long-term Illness 8 2.0 

Diet Therapy Conferences 0.5 

Diet Therapy Practice 4 1.0 



Total 



12 



5.5 



Course 
No. 

115 

116 
117 
152 
153 



Course Title 

The Nurse in Public 

Health 
Introduction to Public 

Health Nursing 
Practice of Public 

Health Nursing 
Principles of Urological 

Nursing 
Practice of Urological 

N ursine: 



Sem. 
Weeks Hrs. 
Pract. Cr. 



1.5 
1.5 
2.0 
1.0 
1.0 



Total 



12 



7.0 






Third Year (Spring Quarter) 



Course 
No. 



126 
109 



Course Title 



Sem. 
Weeks Hrs. 
Pract. Cr. 



Senior Experience 12 

Leadership in Patient 

Care 
Professional Problems 



3.0 



2.0 
1.0 



Total 



6.0 



Grand Total: 

Credit = 93 Semester Hours 

Practice = 108 Weeks r 

* A student may have clinical experiences and f 
related theory in any order within quarters 
thus starred. 

* * A student may have clinical experiences and ; 
related theory in any order within quarters " 
thus starred. 






FEES AND EXPENSES 

(Subject to variation or change) 

On Approx. Approx. Approx. 

Admission March H March 15 March 13 Total 
TUITION AND FEES {6 months) (12mos.) (12mos.) (3 months) 

(Application Fee SI 0.00) 



Matriculation 

Tuition 

Public Health Field Ex- 
pense 

Laboratory 


S 10.00 
140.00 

30.00 
2.00 

10.00 

4.80 


$140.00 

3.00 

16.00 

9.60 


SI 30.00 

60.00 

3.00 

16.00 

9.60 
5.00 


S 40.00 

1.00 

3.00 

2.40 

25.00^ 


S 10.00 
450.00 

60.00 
30.00 


Library 


9.00 


Health and Dental 
Seryice 

Hospitalization Insur- 
ance 


45.00 
26.40 


Nursery School 

Graduation 

5 

UNIFORMS 

1 Uniforms & Accessories 
>weater 


5.00 
25.00 


SI 96.80 

S 93.50 

5.50 

12.75 

3.37 

9.00 


S168.60 
% 12.75 


S223.60 
7.50 


S 71.40 


S660.40 

S 93.50 
5.50 


>hoes 


25.50 


)cissors & Name Pin . . . . 
\ laboratory Coats 
I Cental Public Health 

J Uniforms 

■ ' 


3.37 
9.00 

7.50 



S124.12 .S 12.75 S 7.50 S144.37 

* * The deposit of S25 paid at time of acceptance is credited as graduation fee and is 
educted from final payment, not refundable if student withdraws before admission or 
oes not complete program. 

Other miscellaneous expenses include books, field trips, gym suit, and 
Student Organization fees, which for the full program total approxi- 
mately SI 35.00. See also "Maintenance" and "Uniforms." Special fees are 
charged for the following: For change of schedule, classes, or clinical 
assignment, reinstatement following leave of absence— SIC; special ar- 
rangement for examination— 32; specially scheduled clinical conferences 
—fee as for tutoring. For reasons judged adequate in exceptional circum- 
stances a special fee may be waived by the Dean. 

23 



24 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon acceptance for admission, a deposit of $25.00 is required. This 
is credited as the graduation fee but is not refundable if the student 
withdraws her application or does not finish. On registration day, pay- 
ment is due for tuition and fees for the first six months, for the uniforms 
and certain other expenses. A statement of fees payable on that day will 
be sent to each accepted applicant shortly before registration day. 

The second payment of fees and tuition is due on approximately 
March 15 following admission and covers a 12 months period; the third 
payment is due the following March 15 for a 12 months period; the last 
payment is due on approximately March 15 prior to the June graduation 
for the last 3 months period. Students are billed in advance. Fees become 
due on the first day of the March term and must be paid not later than 
twenty days after the first day of the term. 

Books, gym suit, and articles listed on page 23 under "Uniforms" 
are purchased through the School and obtained after admission in ac- 
cord with instructions given to each student on or after admission. A list 
of necessary personal equipment will be sent to each accepted applicant 
shortly before registration day. 

Students holding hospitalization insurance at the time of admission 
are required to take out insurance through the School as required for all 
students. Students pay one half of the cost and the other half is paid by 
the Hospital. Refunds for policies held on admission may be claimed 
at the office of former policy. 

The School reserves the right to change its tuition and fees in amount, 
time, and manner of payment as necessary. 

MAINTENANCE 

With the exceptions indicated in this paragraph, each student receives 
maintenance consisting of room, an allowance for meals, and laundering 
of uniforms. During the first 22 weeks in the School and during the eight 
weeks she is having experience with the Visiting Nurse Service, the stu- 
dent meets the cost of her meals which are paid for as purchased, at 
approximately |14.00 a week. There are four cafeterias in the Center 
where meals may be purchased. During vacations maintenance is not 
provided. 

UNIFORMS 

The blue plaid chambray uniform of the School, with apron, bib, and 
cap, is worn by the student for all clinical assignments. The tan labora- 
tory coat is worn over street clothes if students return to any floor of the 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 25 

Hospital for study outside of their regular assignment. For the public 
health nursing assignment, each student is required to provide herself 
with a tailored navy or dark coat and hat or beret appropriate to the 
season, and black or navy blue low-heeled walking shoes, preferably 
oxfords, and raincoat of conservative color. Other items of uniform for 
hospital and public health assignments are as listed under "Expenses." 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 

Several scholarships are available each year usually in amounts of $100 
to $400 to students in need of financial assistance. These awards are open 
to both students entering the School of Nursing and those already in the 
School unless otherwise indicated. Factors taken into consideration, in 
addition to financial need, are the student's all-round record as indicated 
by academic work, participation in school and community activities, and 
qualities indicating promise of growth and potential contribution to 
nursing. 

Students taking their first two years of academic work at Cornell in 
Ithaca may obtain additional information on scholarships by writing to 
Scholarship Secretary, Office of Admissions, Cornell University, Ithaca, 
N.Y. 

;j| With the exception of the Regents Scholarship, application is made 
to the Dean, at the time of application for admission to the School for 

ill entering students. For students already in the School, application is 
made not later than February 15 for grants to be used in the period 
March 15 to March 15. 

FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS-Established 
and maintained by a committee of women interested in the School of 
Nursing to assist girls who otherwise would not be able to prepare for 
nursing. 

JULIETTTE E. BLOHME SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an 
endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial 
to Juliette E. Blohme of the Class of 1922 through a gift of $6,000, the 
interest on which may be used in whole or in part each year. 

VIVIAN B. ALLEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an en- 
dowed fund by a gift of $10,000 from the Vivian B. Allen Foundation, 
Inc., income from which is used to provide scholarship aid annually for 
one or more students in need of financial assistance. 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

NASSAU COUNTY (N.Y.) SCHOLARSHIP-Open to entering stu 
dents residing in Nassau County, New York, who plan to enter the fieh 
of public health nursing and hope at some time to hold a position ii 
Nassau County. Scholarship, $600. 

REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS FOR NURSING-Open to residents o 
New York State who make application while in high school. Awarded or 
basis of a competitive examination. Apply to local high school principal 
Scholarships are $350 a year. 

EMMAJEAN STEEL FULLER FUND-This Fund, begun in 1952 hi 
the Class of 1952 in memory of Emmajean Steel Fuller, a former membe 
of the Class, is available for an occasional scholarship. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND-Loans are available to students who havj 
been in the School at least one term. Applications are made to the Dean 
Although applications are accepted at any time during the year, student 
are encouraged to plan, as far as possible, for a year at a time and mak 
application by February 15 for grants to be used in the period March 1 
to March 15. 



N.Y. STATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following three scholarships for residents of New York State 
making application while in high school, are available for the first tW' 
college years as well as for the School of Nursing. 

STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents of Ney 
York State who are graduates of its common schools and academiej 
Annual award $350 for each of four years while in attendance in any aj: 
proved college in the State. This scholarship may therefore be used fo 
the first two years of college required for admission to the School of Nur;' 
ing, and continues for the first two years in the School of Nursim; 
Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local high schoc 
principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 

STATE WAR ORPHANS SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents c 
New York State who are graduates of its common schools and academic 
and who are children of deceased or disabled veterans of the Unite 
States. Annual award $350 towards tuition plus $100 for maintenance fo 
each of four years while in attendance in any approved college in th 
State. This scholarship may therefore be used for the first two years c 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 27 

college required for admission to the School of Nursing and continues 
for the first two years in the School of Nursing. Awarded on the basis of 
Regents examinations under regulations of the State Education Depart- 
ment. Apply to local high school principal, or to Commissioner of 
Education, Albany N. Y. 

STATE CORNELL SCHOLARSHIPS-Open to residents of New York 
State who are graduates of its common schools and academies. Annual 
award $200 reduction in tuition for each of four years. This scholarship 
may be used by students who take the first two years of their academic 
work at Cornell in Ithaca and for the first two years in the School of 
Nursing. Awarded after a competitive examination. Apply to local high 
school principal, or to Commissioner of Education, Albany, N. Y. 



a?(| 
'4 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 13-14.) 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. AN ATOMY -HISTOLOGY. Designed to acquaint the student with the gross and 
microscopic structure of the human body. Laboratory includes cadaver demonstration 
and microscopic examination of prepared slides. 

66 Hours. Miss WRIGHT and assistants. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course consists of a study of the physiological systems and 
their integration into the total functions of the human body. It is closely related to 
the course in Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

45 Hours. Miss RYNBERGEN, Mrs. MacLEOD, Miss ERLANDER. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of physiological chemistry, as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism of 
food, and the composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

60 Hours. Miss RYNBERGEN, Mr. De PETER, Miss ERLANDER. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms. Bacteriology 
and immunology as applied to the agents of infectious diseases. 

45 Hours. Miss WRIGHT, Dr. ABRAHAMS. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

105. PSYCHOSOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF NURSING. This course 
considers the ways in which social science concepts and methods may be incorporated 
and utilized in nursing. It deals with cultural, psychological and social components of 
human behavior with particular emphasis on the way such knowledge may be applied 
to total patient care. 

15 Hours. Mrs. MacGREGOR. 

106. EARLY CHILD DEVELOPMENT. Emphasis is placed upon the growth patterns 
of early childhood and upon the emotional and social forces which affect the child 
from birth to six years. 

15 Hours. Faculty from the Departments of Pediatric, Obstetric and Out-Patient 
Nursing. 

107. THE COMMUNITY AND THE NURSE. Field trips, group projects, oral and 
written reports concerned with this local Health District and Medical Center. 

30 Hours. Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

28 







i- O 

o a, 







Good nursing calls for constant adaptations within sound principles which draw 
from the facts of physical, biological, and social sciences. 




During a field assignment in public health nursing, the student goes into the com- 
munity for experience in family health problems and home care of the sick. 




The New York Hospital-Clornell Medical Center, located at ()8th Street and the East River, covers 
three city blocks— ()8th to 71st Streets— and includes The New York Hospital, the Cornell Univer- 
sity Medical College and the Cornell University-New York Hospital SchcK)l of Nursing. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 29 

108. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF NURSING. An overview of the history of 
nursing, tracing particularly what has constituted nursing and conditions and factors 
which have strengthened or weakened it. Presented against a background of the de- 
velopments in religion, science, medicine, hospitals and public health. Readings in 
both primary and secondary sources. 

30 Hours. Miss DUNBAR and special lecturers. 

109. PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS. A reading course with 15 hours of class in 
which to bring into focus important professional problems for further reading. The 
purpose is to help the student understand important trends and developments in 
which she will need to play an intelligent part and which she will be expected to 
interpret to others. These include activities related to legislation, education, improve- 
ment of nursing services, costs of medical care, and international participation. 

15 Hours. Miss DUNBAR and special lecturers. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

115. THE NURSE IN PUBLIC HEALTH. Principles of public health and public 
health nursing; organization and functions of nursing service and its relationship to 
other services. 

25 Hours. Miss FRENCH and special lecturers. 

116. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Application of principles 
developed in P.H. 115 to the field of public health nursing. Agency policies and func- 
tions in the light of principles, community need, and available health services. Group 
discussions, student reports. 

30 Hours. Miss TYRIE, Mrs. CAREY, Miss DISOSWAY, Mrs. GELBER and staff. 

117. PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Supervised field instruction with 
increasing responsibility for a selected group of individuals and families requiring 
nursing care and health guidance at home. Provided by affiliation with the Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York and Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn. 

8 Weeks. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE and staff. 

OUT-PATIENT (AMBULATORY) NURSING 

118. PRINCIPLES OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Nurs- 
ing care of ambulatory patients, both children and adults, is taught through demon- 
stration and informal family and community-centered conferences. Emphasis is 
placed upon health teaching, and the use of community resources in insuring compre- 
hensive patient care, and also upon the cooperation of the nurse with other professions 
in a program for health maintenance and for the prevention, control, and rehabilita- 
tion of disease. (See Core Course 125). 

20 Hours. Faculty of the Department of Out-Patient Nursing. 

119. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Se- 
lected clinics provide experience in the pediatric, medical and surgical services. The 
student is helped to understand the value of continuity of patient care through work- 
ing closely with other departments of the Hospital and with community agencies. 

6 Weeks. Faculty of the Department of Out-Patient Nursing. 



30 SCHOOL OF NLRSIXG 

FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND ALLIED COURSES 

120. ORIENTATION. These discussions are planned to help the student make an 
effective and happy adjustment to dormitory living and to familiarize her with the 
overall plan of the program. They emphasize the importance of her physical and 
mental health as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in her work. 

15 Hours. Miss DUNBAR, Miss LYONS, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss McDERMOTT, 
Miss STEWART. 

121. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING. An introduction to nursing practice designed 
to be a foundation for all clinical nursing courses. The major content is concerned 
with basic nursing procedures used in the hygienic care of the patient, in the diagnosis 
of disease conditions and in the treatment of illness. Emphasis is placed on the psycho- 
social and cultural concepts in nursing. 

295 Hours. Miss LIFGREN, Miss HARTVIGSEN, Miss MILLAR, Miss PEELING, 
Miss BRESCIA. 

122. PHARMACOLOGY. Designed to give the student information and methods 
basic to administration of medicines; facts and principles of drug therapy, study of 
commonly used drugs, responsibility of the nurse, methods of calculation of dosage. 
45 Hours. Miss MILLER, Miss MILLAR. 

123. CORE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM, SURGICAL AND OUT-PATIENT 
NURSING. Lectures and demonstrations focus on the principles basic to the preven- 
tion, the etiology, and the control of disease in the plan for the total care of patients in 
these departments. 

60 Hours. Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Departments of Operating Room, 
Surgery and Out-Patient. 

124. PRINCIPLES OF NURSING IN LONG TERM ILLNESS (INCLUDING 
TUBERCULOSIS AND ORTHOPEDICS). Emphasis is on prevention, care, and 
rehabilitation in chronic illness. Recognition is given to the problems and needs of 
patients as well as those of the nurse in providing comprehensive care. Special con- 
sideration is given to individuals having tuberculosis and orthopedic conditions. 

33 Hours. Miss McVEY, Miss SMITH, and others. 

125. PRACTICE OF NURSING IN LONG TERM ILLNESS (INCLUDING TUBER- 
CULOSIS AND ORTHOPEDICS). An experience consisting of practice in the hospital 
and field trips to community agencies which cooperate in providing care needed by 
long term illness patients. Practice is carried out with a few selected patients including 
those having orthopedic problems and tuberculosis. Part of the practice is carried out 
cooperatively with fourth year medical students in the Comprehensive Care Clinic. 
Consideration is given to the contribution the nurse can make in her relationships 
with patients and other health workers. 

8 Weeks. Miss McVEY, and others. 

126. PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP IN PATIENT CARE. Through lecture and 
seminars students are guided in considering some of the special responsibilities of 
professional nurses today. These include the teaching of individuals and groups; the 
guidance and supervision of auxiliary personnel and planned investigation of prob- 
lems related to nursing care. 

30 Hours. Miss SIMMS and Faculty from clinical departments. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

127. SENIOR EXPERIENCE. During the last term of the program the student re- 
turns to a clinical department of her choice. She cares for selected patients who have 
complex nursing needs; functions as leader of the nursing team and participates in the 
management of the pavilion. If she desires she may select and explore in detail a 
special nursing problem in which she is interested. 
12 Weeks. Faculty from all departments. 



NUTRITION 

135. NUTRITION. Normal adult nutrition based on the courses in Biochemistry 
and Physiology. A study of the functions and food sources of the major food groups, 
their availability in the world and in the community, the needs of the individual and 
relationship of cultural patterns to food habits and nutrition are included., (The 
nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are discussed during the stu- 
dent's practice on pediatric and obstetric services.) 

12 Hours. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss ERLANDER. 

136. DIET THERAPY AND FOOD PREPARATION. Designed to present the under- 
lying principles in the treatment of disease by diet. It is accompanied by laboratory 
work in principles of food preparation, and in the preparation of foods and meals 
included in therapeutic diets. The course is implemented by clinical conferences dur- 
ing the student's practice on medical, surgical, obstetric and pediatric services. 

36 Hours. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss ERLANDER. 

137. DIET THERAPY PRACTICE. The application of the principles of diet therapy 
to the care and teaching of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the 
Hospital. 

4 Weeks. Miss STEPHENSON and staff. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss ERLANDER. 

138. DIET THERAPY CONFERENCES. Through conference discussions, integrated 
with the practice assignment, the student is oriented to the practical application of her 
knowledge of nutrition and diet therapy in the care of hospitalized and ambulatory 
patients. 

8 Hours. Miss RYNBERGEN. 



MEDICAL NURSING 

140. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING. The nursing care of patients with 
medical, and neurological diseases is considered. Discussion of medical aspects of dis- 
ease supplements and inteprets etiology, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

68 Hours. Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Medicine. 

141. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL NURS- 
ING. Supervised practice is offered in the application of nursing principles to the 
care of patients on the medical and neurological pavilions of the Hospital. 

12 Weeks. Faculty of the Department of Medical Nursing. 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SURGICAL NURSING 

150. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. The care of surgical patients is 
presented by conference and demonstration. Individualized care, planned instruction, 
and rehabilitation of the patient are stressed. (See Core Course 123.) 

24 Hours. Faculty of the Department of Surgical Nursing. 

151. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. Planned experience in meeting patients' 
needs through guided practice in surgical asepsis, pre- and post-operative teaching 
and therapeutic team relationship. 

12 Weeks. Faculty of ttie Department of Surgical Nursing. 

152. PRINCIPLES OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Anomalies and diseases of the 
genitourinary tract, management, and nursing care. 

15 Hours. Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Surgery. 

153. PRACTICE OF UROLOGICAL NURSING. Planned care during pre- and 
post-operative phase with emphasis on the emotional aspects of genito-urinary dis- 
orders, and preparation for self-care on discharge. 

4 Weeks. Faculty of the Department of Surgical Nursing. 

154. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Through lectures, discus- 
sions and demonstrations, students are taught the principles and methods of aseptic 
technique in relation to the care of patients at the lime of operation. Immediate post- 
operative care is included. (See Core Course 123.) 

32 Hours. Faculty of the Department of Operating Room Nursing. 

155. PRACTICE OF OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Students observe and assist 
with operative procedures. They are guided in relating this experience to the total 
care of surgical patients. Experience in Recovery Room is offered at this time. 

6 Weeks. Faculty of the Department of Operating Room Nursing. 



MATERNITY AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING 

160. PRINCIPLES OF MATERNITY AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Focuses 
on the reproductive process, the characteristics of the newborn infant, and current 
developments in obstetrics. Knowledge of the social sciences is applied to the imder- 
standing of the emotional aspects of childbearing, and the family as a social unit. 
Consideration is given to common problems encountered in the care and teaching of 
gynecologic patients. 

78 Hours. Medical and Nursing faculties of the Department of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

161. PRACTICE OF MATERNITY AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Principles 
are applied in the comprehensive care of mothers and infants with related experience 
in the out-patient clinics, labor and delivery floor and the rooming-in units. There is 
guided observation of the special health problems of women in the out-patient clinics. 

12 Weeks. Faculty of the Department of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. A study of the representative disease 
conditions of infancy and childhood against a background of the normal physical and 
emotional needs of infants, children and their families. Lectures, group discussions, 
case presentations and visual aids. 

75 Hours. Faculties of the Departments of Pediatrics and Pediatric Nursing. 

171. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. Guided experiences in the use of 
knowledge in the care of premature infants, sick infants and children and of children 
in Nursery School. Group conferences, demonstrations and comprehensive nursing 
studies. 

12 Weeks. Faculty of the Department of Pediatric Nursing. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The history, pathology and treat- 
ment of psychiatric illness, and the basic principles involved in the nursing care of 
patients with personality disorders, from infancy to old age. The program helps the 
student to develop an understanding of self and relationships to others, an objective 
attitude toward psychiatric illness and the nurse's role in helping the patient solve 
the problems of his illness and rehabilitation. 
74 Hours. Faculties of the Departments of Psychiatry and Psychiatric Nursing. 

\Sl. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. Supervised experience in the observa- 
tion and care of the emotionally ill patient during the acute phase of illness, con- 
valescence and rehabilitation. Participation in currently approved therapies, including 
psychotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies, and somatic therapies. Guided 
practice in creating a therapeutic and socially rehabilitative environment for patients. 
12 Weeks. Faculty of the Department of Psychiatric Nursing. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Principles of good body mechanics in work and play, and 
how to apply this knowledge in patient care. It aims to develop skill in individual 
and team recreational activities which will enable the student to use leisure time to 
greater advantage. 
52 Hours (Total). Mrs. HAZEL. 



ADMINISTRATION 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL- 
CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 
Joseph C. Hinsey, Director 

JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 



Arthur H. Dean 
Stanton Griffis 
Deane W. Malott 



Board of Trustees c 
Cornell Universit\ 



Francis Kernan, Chairman ^ Board of Governors c 

Hamilton Hadley I The Society of 

Henry S. Sturgis J the New York HospitJ 

Frederic W. Ecker 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

S. S. Atwood, Chairman Provost of Cornell Universit 

Deane W. Malott President of Cornell Universit 

Louis M. Loeb ^i Governors of The Society c 

Mrs. Charles S. Payson .... j the New York Hospitc 

Frank Glenn, M.D President, Medical Boarc 

The New York Hospitc 

Mrs. August Belmont Member-at-Larg 

John E. Deitrick, M.D. Dean,Cornell University Medical Colle^ 

Virginia M. Dunbar, R.N Dean of the School of Nursin 

Joseph C. Hinsey Director, The New York Hospital 

Cornell Medical Centt\ 

Ruth Irish Member-at-Lar^ 

Walsh McDermott, M.D Prof essor of Public Health an 

Preventive Medicin 
Elizabeth Ogden^ R.N. . . Alumnae Association, School of Nursin 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D Director of The Neiv York Hospiti 

Marian G. Randall, R.N. . . . Director of the Visiting Nurse Seiuic 

of New Yo7 i 

Mrs. Samuel Rosenberry Member-at-Lar^ 

Mrs. Harold Temple President, Committee for Scholarship 

34 



ADMINISTRATION 35 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D. Fresiderjt of Cornell University 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Associate Dean 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A Director of the Residence 

Mary Jo Munroe, B.A., B.S. in L.S. Librarian 

Tracy Dwyer Registrar 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Riddick Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki, A.B Secretary to the Dean 

Mrs. Frances Baillie Secretary to the Associate Dean 

Carolyn Diehl, M.D Scliool Physician 

Mrs. Ena Stevens-Fisher Supervisor, Nurses Health Service 



CHAIRMEN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admissions Miss Hazeltine 

Curriculum Miss Lyons 

Library Miss Foster 

Records Miss Walters 

Student Affairs Miss Kurihara 

Financial Aid Miss Dunbar 

Promotions: 

Terms 1-2 Miss Rynbergen 

Terms 3-6 Miss Saffioti 

Terms 7-10 Miss Tait 

Term 11 Miss Fedder 

Student and Staff Health Mrs. Overholser 

Affiliating Students Miss Wallace 

Nursing Rounds Miss Dericks 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Louise Hazeltine '49 President 

Marguerite Plow '30 Executive Secretary 



COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

vIrs. Harold L. Temple President 



I 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
STUDENTS OF THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

Office of the Dean of Men, Dean of Women Virginia Pratt 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman) 

College of Home Economics Jean Failing 

Professor of Home Economics, Chairman of Counseling Service 

College of Arts and Sciences F. G. Marcham 

Professor of History 

RoLLiN L. Perry 

Assistant Dean 

College of Agriculture Howard S. Tyler 

Professor in Personnel Administration 
in charge of Vocational Guidance Placement 

Office of Admissions Robert Storandt 

Associate Director 



t:] 









J 



FACULTY 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., President of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriett Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

Verda F. Hickox, M.A., R.N. ,Pro/e55or Emeritus of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of Nursing. 
(A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia University, 1930; Diploma, Bedford College 
and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, London, England, 1936.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia University, 
1936; M.A., 1947.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Surgical Nursing; Head of 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columbia University, 1936; M.A., 1951.) 

Frances C. Macgregor, M.A., Visiting Associate Professor, Social Science. (A.B., Uni- 
versity of California, 1927; M.A., University of Missouri, 1947.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing; 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 1944.) 

Henderika J, Rynbergen, M.S., Associate Professor of Science. (B.S., Simmons College, 
1922; M.S., Cornell University, 1938.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., K.l<i ., Associate Prof essor of Pediatric Nursing; Head of Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia University, 1932.) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

■Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical Nursing; Department 
Head, Medical Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939, B.S., 
1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

MtTRiEL Carbery, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing 
Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School 
5f Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of America, 1951.) 

37 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary Jeanne Clapp, M.N., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing (Orthopedics); 
Director Nursing Service, The Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.A., Mount Holyoke 
College, 1940; M.N., Yale University School of Nursing, 1943.) 

Elinor Fuerst Dahlke, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Administrative 
Assistant to the Dean. (Diploma in Nursing, Christ Hospital School of Nursing, Jersey 
City, N. J., 1937; B.S., Columbia University, 1946; M.A., 1951.) 

Virginia Carol^^ n Dericks, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursirig Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of 
Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Helma Fedder, M.N., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942; M.N., University of Washington, 
1954.) 

Lilian Henderson, M.A., R.N., Assistajit Professor of Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 
1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Elizabeth Hosford, M.A., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant Professor of Obstetric Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (B.S., Keuka College, 1947; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1952; Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, N.Y., 1953.) 






Audrey McCluskev, ^LA., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Department Head, 
Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1945; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1948.) 






Eleanor Muhs, NLA., R.N., Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Nursing; Director, Psy-WUiZ, 
chiatric Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of Nursing, Roch^A^yr 
ester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1954.| 



i 



M. Eva Paton, ALA.. R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursirig; Head 
of Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York University, 1950.) 

Mary Stewart, M.A., Counselor of Students. (B.A., Elmira College. 1926; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1950.) 

Edna Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical A^ursing; Head of Operating 
Roojn Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 
Pawtucket, R. I., 1933; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1949.) i 

Margie A. Warren, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; Depart- ' 
ment Head, Out-Patierit A^ursing. (Diploma in Nursing. Protestant Deaconess Hospital 
School of Nursing, Evansville, Ind.; B.S., Indiana University, 1949; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1957.) 

Lucille ^VRIGHT. M.S., R.N.. Assistant Professor of Science. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.A., University of Colorado, 1950; 
M.S., Cornell University, 1955.) 



i 



FACULTY 39 

INSTRUCTORS 

*Marv Biilski, B.S.. R.X., Instructor in Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 
1949.) 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Out- 
"^aticut Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924; 
i.S., C olumbia University, 1945.) 

'Vlfreda Burblis, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
i^ursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Bridgeport Hospital School of Nursing, 1942; 
\.S.. Boston University, 1952; M.A., Columbia University, 1956.) 

.()\->rAN'CE Derrell, M.A., R.N., CS.M., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nurs- 
ng; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
.incoln School of Nursing, New York, 1938; B.S., New York University, 1945; Mid- 
.iferv Certificate, Tuskegee Institute, Ala.. 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1948.) 

)arlene Erlander, B.A., Instructor in Science. (B.A., St. Olaf College, Northfield, 
linnesota, 1952.) 

{\\<\ J. Foster, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
!/' w>?g Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1944; M.N., Yale University School of 
ursing, 1947.) 

AN French, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Public Health Nursing; Consultant to the 
;/ ^ing Service on Public Health Nursing. ('B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1949; 
[.A.. Columbia University, 1955.) 

\ A Hazel, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. (^B.P.H.E., University of Toronto, 
• 17: M.A., Columbia University, 1948.) 

\KOL C. Fripp, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, Pedi- 
ric Nursing Service. (B.A., Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C, 1944; Diploma in 
uising, Meharry Medical College School of Nursing, Nashville, Tenn., 1948.) 

HisE Hazeltine, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
urging Service. (B.A., Bucknell University, 1946; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell Uni- 
r-iiv-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., Cornell University, 1949.) 

\RV L. Healy, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor. Medical Nurs- 
'j; Service. (Diploma in Ntirsing, Genesee Hospital School of Nursing, Rochester, 
^w York; B.S., University of Rochester, 1947.) 

.ULiNE Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night Super- 
yor. Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas School of 
"using, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1947.) 

'iirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Surgical 
hrsing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
( icago. 111., 1925; B.S.. Columbia University, 1942.) 

( \Dvs Tyson Jones, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Recovery 
lorn Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
Siool of Nursing, 1944; B.S.. Columbia University, 1951.) 



Lea\e of absence for Summer and Fall 195 



40 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Vera R. Keane, M.A., R.N., C.N.M., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing; Supervisor Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., Columbia University, 1949; M.A., 
1957; Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, 1951.) 

Marie Kurihara, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1950; B.S., Cornell University, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1956.) 

Jane Knox, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stanford University Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; 
B.A., Stanford University, 1945; M.A., Columbia University, 1955.) 

Elsie H. Lehman, B.S., R.N,, Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Englewood Hospital School of Nursing, N. J., 
1949; B.S., Columbia University, 1953.) 

Edna Elizabeth Lifgren, M.A.,K.K., Instructor in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 
1954; M.A., 1957.) 

Martha B. MacLeod, M..\., Instructor in Science (Physiology). (B.A., Smith College, 
1938; M.A., Syracuse University, 1950.) 

Frances McVev, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing (Long-term Illness and Rehabilita- 
tion). (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Immaculate Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1946; B.S., St. John's University, 1954.) 

Dorothy Metzger, M.A. , K.N. .Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supennsor in Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1947; B.S., Cornell University, 1947; M..^., Columbia University, 1953.) 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Ninsing. Mary Johnston Hospital School 
of Nursing, Manila, P. I., 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1934.) 

Marjorie Millf:r, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing, Cleve- 
land; B.S., William J. Bryan University. Dayton, Tcnn., 1949; NLS., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1954.) 

Wanda Robertson, B.S.. R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1945; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1915.) 

Sue Sabia, M.A., R.N.. Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Department Head, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School of 
Nursing, Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1950.) 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Michael's Hospital School of Nursing, 
Newark, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A., 1954.) 

Doris Schwartz, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, 
Comprehensive Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, Methodist 
Hospital School of Nursing. Brooklyn, New York, 1942; B.S., New York University, 
1953.) 



FACULTY 41 

Laura L. Simms, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Assistant Director of Nursing 
Service. (B.A., Texas State College for Women, Denton, Texas, 1940; Diploma in 
Nursing, Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas, 1945; M.Ed., Southern 
Methodist University, Dallas, 1950.) 

Dean Smith, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing (Orthopedics); Education 
Director, The Hospital for Special Surgery. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1952; M.A., 1955.) 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

Marjorie a. Tait, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Assistant Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing. (B.S., Wayne University, Detroit, Mich., 1951.) 

Margaret H. Terry, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient }s[urs- 
ing; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital School of Nursing, Manchester, N. H., 1935; B.S., 
Boston University, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 

Ethel Marie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing; Super- 
visor, Pediatric Out-Patient Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind., 1944; Diploma 
in Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 

Grace Wallace, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Superxnsor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., University of California, San Francisco, 1942; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1956.) 

Jeanette Walters, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
Assistant Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., New York University, 1944; 
M.A., 1949.) 

Mamie Wang, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Peiping Medical College School 
of Nursing, Peiping, China, 1938; B.S., Yenching University, China, 1938; M.A., Colum- 
bia University, 1943.) 

FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

John E. Deitrick, M.D Dean 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

R. Gordon Douglas, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Vincent DU Vigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd, M.D. Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D Professor of Medicine 

Walsh McDermott, M.D. . . . Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

James M. Neill, Ph.D Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Robert F. Pitts, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Walter F. Riker, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 

ASSISTANTS IN INSTRUCTION 

Marjorie H. Acnew, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1940; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1952.) 

Genrose J. Alfano, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nurs- 
ing; Supervisor in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 1947; B.S., 
Bridgeport University, Bridgeport, Conn., 1953; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 

Carmella Brescia, B.S., R.X., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S., Syracuse 
University, 1955.) 

Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor Medi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1931.) 

Isabel Cameron, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Winncpeg General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Winnepeg, Canada, 1929; B.S., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Theresa Christian, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. Freedman Hospital School of Nursing, 
Washington, D. C, 1937; B.S., Loyola University. C;hicago. 111., 1941; M.S., University 
of Chicago, 1947.) 

Jane D. Curtis, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursitig 
Service. (B.S., Dickinson College, Carlisle. Pa.. 1939; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942.) 

David A. DePeter, M.S., Assistant in Science (Biochemistry). (B.S.. St. John's College, 
Brooklyn, 1953; M.S., 1956.) 

Alice Marie DonDero, B.S.. R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital School of 
Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951.) 

Dorothy Douvard, K.N. ,Assista7it in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Providence 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1945.) 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1935.) 

Lois Hartvigsen, B.S.. R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
Cornell University.) 

Dorothy Jackson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Gynecological Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue School of Nursing, 1946; 
B^S., Hunter College, 1953.) 

Ruth E. Kenny, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A., 1956.) 

42 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 43 

Claire Meyerowitz, MA., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor. Private Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1945; MA., 
New York University, 1957.) 

Mary Millar, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
Cornell University, 1954.) 

Elizabeth Peeling, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
Cornell University, 1955.) 

Irma K, Riley, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Montreal General Hospital School of Nursing, 
1948; B.S., Columbia University, 1955.) 

Mary Rothschild, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor in Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nutsing, 
1954; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1954.) 

Jeanne Sherman, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing, Assistant Supervisor, Ob- 
stetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Skidmore College, 1947; B.S., Skidmore 
College, 1947.) 

Virginia Simpson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1951, 
B.S., Simmons College, 1953.) 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxton 
Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Elizabeth Mary Simmons, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School of Nursing, 
Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., 1952.) 

Jessie Weaver, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 1924.) 

Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, Waverly, 
Mass., 1933.) 

LECTURERS 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures 

Cornell University Medical College 

STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Helen V. Miller, R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N Night Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N Evening Administrative Assistant 



44 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Dju Ing, M.S Relief Administrative Assistant 

Elizabeth McKeown, MA., R.N Administrative Assistant for 

Professional In-service Education 

Julia Dennehy, M.A., R.N Administrative Assistant for 

Auxiliary Personnel Training 

Martha Weller, B.S., R.N Assistant in Staff Education 

Eleanor Young, R.N Assistant in Staff Education 

Lois Cantrell, B.Ed., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Lf.fa Rose, R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Beatrice McKee, R.N Supervisor, Psychiatric Service 

Carolyn Wagner, R.N Supervisor, Out-Patient Department 

Inez MuLLiNs, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ruth Nielsen, R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Maude David, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N. Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Dorothy Ellison, B.A., R.N Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Lucy Hickey, R.N Supervisor, Private Operating Rooms 

Eloise Cooke, R.N Assistant Sujyervisor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Lydia H. Hansen, R.N Instructor of Auxiliary Staff 

Francis Sheedy, R.N Instructor of Auxiliary Staff 

Jeanne Harquail, B.S., R.N Assistant Instructor of Auxiliary Staff 

HEAD NURSES 
MEDICINE 



Abraham. Marilyn, B.S. 
Bailey, Jane 
Buehier. Meta, B.S. 



Cutright. Rosemary 
Greisen. Claire, B.S. 
Greus, Ruth, B.S. 



Ibsen. Doris 
Lagerquist. Elaine, B.S. 



SURGERY 



Besecker, Shirley 
Bitting, Amy 
Caron, Theresa 
Cheroniak, Tillie 



Cullington. Barbara 
Dieterle, Doris 
Huxster, Marilyn, B.S. 
LaMarche, Lois 



Lubowska, Nina 
Pruchnik, Blanche 
Scola. .Antoinette 
Weekes. Charlotte 



OPERATING ROOM 



Bosco, Antoinette, B.S. 
Brodzinski, Bernadine 
Burley, Wanda, B.S. 
Burnett, Dorothy 
Collins, Margaret, B.S. 
Derr, Barbara 
Edmundson, Ida 



Farmer, Rosemary 
Husted, Salome 
Kchrli, Nancy 
Langendorff, Gerda 
Maclnnis, Mora 
O'Connor, Christine 
Ondovchik, Anna, B.S. 



M.S. 



Rail, Rozalia, B.A. 
Rectanus, Dorothy 
Schultz, Rosemarie 
Sulette, Mary, B.S. 
Vella, Mary 
W^estphal, Freda 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Bott, Alma 
Colwell, Anna 
Conner, Agnes 
Hammond, Grace 
Leonardo, Yolanda 



Lutz, Hilda, B.S. 
Marshall, Jane 
Mathews, Thelma 
Matus, Veronica 
Mercer. .Anne 



O'Rourke, Mary, B.S. 
Schaffner. Jeanne, B.S. 
Wygant. Mary, B.S. 
Young, Kathleen 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



45 



Aikins, Helen L., M.A. 
Bartlett, Mary 
Brescia, Carmella, B.S. 
Budovic, Geraldine, B.S. 
Carman, Edna 



Clark, Evelyn 
Connolly, Kathleen, B.S. 
Evans, Alberta 
Foley, Alice 
Frohman, Marie 



Hines, Marilyn 
Ikeda, I toko 
Liddle, Evelyn 
Sweeney, Claire, B.S. 
Toter, Roseanne 



Coyle, Patricia 
Gerchak, Helen 



PRIVATE PATIENTS 

Kozitsky, Mary 
Morgan, Agnes, B.S. 
Reynolds, Mary 



Smith, Anne 
Soranno, Jenny 



Bertagna, Elda 
Dawes, Carol 



PEDIATRICS 

Desmond, Anne, B.S. 
Dial, Hazel 



Gerrier, Eleanor 
Zemlock, Margaret, B.A. 



PSYCHIATRY (Payne Whitney Clinic) 



Auger, Lillian 
Hibbard, Alta 



Janes, Carl 
Nichols, Jane 
Schwartz, Billie 



Smith, Jo Ann 
Ulatowski, Amelia 



NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 



Louise Stephenson, M.S., Director 



Katherine Bain, B.S. 
Donna Hovet Gallon, B.S. 
Emily Hanson, B.S. 
Catherine Kellerman, B.S. 
Rita Krim, B.S. 



Emily Kroog, B.S. 

Susan Paige, B.S. 

Shirley Sklar, B.S. 

Virginia Pearson Snyder, B.S. 

Carol Sullivan, B.S. 



OCCUPATIONAL AND RECREATIONAL THERAPY 

Eva Mazur, B.A., O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Main Hospital 

Mildred Spargo, O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Psychiatry 

Grace C. Newberg, B.A. Director, Recreational Therapy, Psychiatry 

Muhi Yasumura, M.A. , O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Pediatrics 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 



Theodate H. Soule, M.A Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel, A.B Director, The Lying-in Hospital 

Elizabeth F. Hewitt, M.A Chief Social Worker, Payne Whitney Clinic 



46 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Marian Randall, B.S., R.N Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Service of New York 

Eleanor W. Mole, B.S Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 

NURSERY SCHOOLS 

Mrs. Eleanor Blumgart, M.A Director of Nursery School, 

Department of Pediatrics 
Mrs. Eleanor Reich Brussel Co-director, New York School for Nursery Years 
Mrs. Dorothy Cleverdon, M.A Educational Director, Summer Play Schools 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL 



Name 

AUonen, Taina 
Beal, Barbara Ann 
Beard, Laurie Yegen 
Beckley, Tozia Anne 
Browne, Frances E. 
Chase, Joan Merrill 
Ghetto, Adrienne R. 
Daldy, Nora K. 
Deffigos, Mary 
De Paola, Anita V. 
Derk, Anne M. 
Dole, Charlotte M. 
Doppel, Jane Marie 
Dorie, Jeanne Burns 
Douglas, Lynne L. 
Drummond, Dorothy 
Eisman, Roberta Gay 
Elder, Margaret 
Eyerman, Jean Gardner 
Ferrin, Miriam Marie 
Follett, Jane Van Avery 
Gillespie, Mary Susan 
Graham, Marcia Hoyt 
Haertl, Eileen Barbara 
Hahn, Johanne C. 
Heldmann, Marlene Ann 
Hering, Ellen 
Rowland, Charity Ann 
Hunter, Carol Dorothy 
Jackson, Phyllis 
Keep, Eleanor Ruth 
Kleinert. Patricia A. 
Knight, Katherine Ann 
Kraut, Priscilla C. 
Light, Cynthia Anne 
Littell, Janice Mae 
Loewi. Mary Jane 
Mangan, Helen Marie 
Marsden, Marion Hennessey 
Marshall, Vanessa Ann 
McCabe, Eleanor 
McGrath. Lois Alice 
McMullen, Elizabeth E. 
Miller, Ruth Elaine 
Millett, June Ellen 
Morse, Constance Jean 



CLASS OF 1958 

Address 

New York, N. Y. 
Elmer, N.J. 
Teaneck, N. J. 
Nanticoke, Pa. 
Roslyn Estates, N. Y. 
Pembroke, N. H. 
New York, N. Y. 
Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Boonton, N.J. 
Cresskill, N.J. 
Elkins Park, Pa. 
Harlowton, Mont. 
West Point, Pa. 
Valley Stream, N. Y. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Clarkesville, Ark. 
New York, N.Y. 
New York, N.Y. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Waban, Mass. 
Fairfield, Conn. 
Midland, Mich. 
Salt Point, N.Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Andover, N. Y. 
Douglaston, N. Y. 
Dedham, Mass. 
North East, Pa. 
Woodmere, N. Y. 
Saranac Lake, N. Y. 
Croton Falls, N. Y. 
Signal Mountain, Tenn. 
Levittown, N. Y. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Hamden, Conn. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Ocean City, N. J. 
St. Albans, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Hershey, Pa. 
Vandalia, 111. 
Vanceboro, Maine 
Tully, N. Y. 



College from which 
Transferred 
Hunter College 
Ursinus College. 
Cornell University 
Bucknell University 
Albertus Magnus College 
New England College 
Hunter College 
Cornell University 
Douglass College 
New Rochelle College 
Ursinus College 
University of Redlands 
Cornell University 
St. John's University 
Bradford Junior College 
Wooster College 
University of Rochester 
Hunter College 
Pennsylvania State University 
Lindenwood College 
Bradford Junior College 
Denison University 
Bucknell University 
University of Massachusetts 
Cornell University 
New Rochelle College 
Northwestern University 
Cornell University 
Concordia Collegiate Institute 
Bradford Junior College 
Wooster College 
University of Michigan 
Paul Smith's College 
Colby College 
Sarah Lawrence College 
Cornell University 
Centenary Junior College 
University of Maine 
Marywood College 
Douglass College 
Hunter College 
Wells College 
Hershey Junior College 
Washington University 
University of Maine 
Elmira College 



47 



48 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name 

Morton, Margaret Theresa 
Muench, Julie Hodgson 
Noyce, Judith Carol 
Osier, Alice Linda 
Plimpton, Deborah 
Pollard, Joyce E. 
Rizzo, Helene A. 
Singh, Leila 
Slysz, Marianne S. 
Spain, Rita Elaine 

Sugimoto, Madeleine S. 
Swan, Charlotte Ann 
Taksen, Carolyn Ruth 
Taylor, Jean Ann 
Tychsen, Evelyn Mae 
Ward, Arline Dolores 
Westcott, Gail Ann 
Wolf, Carol Ann 
Young, Hester Bateman 
Young. Margaret Nan 



Address 

Elmhurst, N. Y. 
Bryn Maw r. Pa. 
White Plains, N. Y. 
Medomak, Maine 
Framingham Centre, Mass 
Old Greenwich, Conn. 
Clifton, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
New Britain, Conn. 
Wilson, N. C. 

New York, N. Y. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Highland Park. \. J. 
East Hartford, Conn. 
Fairfield, Conn. 
Westwood, N.J. 
Babylon. N. Y. 
Tappan, N. Y. 
West Orange. X. J. 



College from which 
Transferred 
Marymount College 
Colby Junior College 
Cornell University 
University of Maine 
.Western Reserve University 
Pembroke College 
Caldwell College 
Hunter College 
New Rochelle College 
Woman's College of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 
Hunter College 
University of Maine 
Cornell University 
Douglass College 
Wheaton College 
Moravian College 
Bucknell University 
University of Nebraska 
Cornell University 
Hood Colleu:e 



CLASS OF 1959 



Abbot, Joan Byington 
Acker, Barbara Jane 
Adams, Judith Carol 
Adcock, Irene Horner 
Barrett, Veronica Katherine 
Belt, Liia Faye 
Benson, Susan Elinor 
Blanpied, Mary Jane 
Blau. Beverly Sandra 
Bock. Helen Ruth 
Brew, Sandra Lynn 
Bubeck, Naomi Ruth 

Busfield, Margaret Jean 
Chamberlin, Patricia Dodd 
Clark. Evelynn Mackay 
Clark, Margaret Louise 
Cowan, Judith Toby 
Crockett, Elizabeth Ann 
Crouse, Jean Marilyn 
Cullen, Carolyn Claire 
Darby, Patricia Anne 
Davis, Virginia Frances 
Dennick, Mary Fay 
Downing, Beatrice Mary 



Bay Shore, N. Y. 
Allentown, Pa. 
Floral Park, N. Y. 
Catonsville, Md. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Quincy, Mass. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Denver. Colo. 
Patchogue, N. Y. 
W^ood haven, N. Y. 
Sturgis, Mich. 
Moanza sur Inzia, 

Belgian Congo 
Deposit, N. Y. 
Croton Falls, N. Y. 
New Hartford, N. Y. 
Newton, N. J. 
Malba, N. Y. 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Wolcott, N. Y. 
Tuckahoe, N. Y. 
Noroton Heights, Conn. 
Hingham, Mass. 
Hamburg, N. Y. 
Callicoon Center, N. Y. 



Cornell University 
Wilson College 
Drew University 
Bucknell University 
St. John's University 
University of Massachusetts 
Cornell University 
Grinnell College 
Cornell University 
Queens College 
Miami University 
Eastern Baptist College 

Cornell University 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
Martha Washington College 
Queens College 
Morgan State College 
St. Lawrence University 
Mary Washington College 
St. Elizabeth College 
Bates College 
Cornell University 
Marywood College 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL 



49 



Name 

Durant, Joan 
Ehren, Sylvia Elise 
Eick, Martha Lloyd 
Fan, Lois Caroline 
Fernandez, Joan Josephine 
Fong, Sylvia Bow Hing 
Franco, Barbara 
Frantz, Millicent 
Fugazzi, Joan Rita 
Gleichenhaus, Jean Susan 
Haegele, Marlene Emily 
Hengesch, Christine Anne 

Herrmann, Marlene Anne 
Hicking, Stephanie 
Horan, Barbara Reynolds 
Huddleston, Jean Mary 
Huntington, Evelyn Rosalie 
Hutchins, Judith 
Jeffers, Carol Anne 
Kane, Sylvia Ann 
Kindred, Ann Drewry 
Kislo, Carolyn Rose 



Address 

Ridgefield, Conn. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Bedminster, N. J. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Willow Grove, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wilton, Conn. 
East Aurora, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
New York, N. Y. 
Hazelton, Pa. 
Framingham Centre, 

Mass. 
Plainfield,N.J. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
Decatur, 111. 
Fayetteville, Ark. 
Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J. 
Westfield, N. J. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Northampton, Mass. 



Knecht, Suzanne Christine Saddle River, N. J. 
Kourakos, Helen Mary New York, N. Y. 

Kuhn, Marjorie Louise Mt. Morris, N. Y. 

Kummer, Barbara WilhelminaCarversville, Pa. 



Law, Janet Marie 
Leopold, Karla Helena 
Major, Maxine Barbara 
Matthes, Anne Carpenter 
Moore, Valerie Anne 
Moyer, Dawn Lenore 
McCloskey, Margaret Ann 
Osmer, Carol Margaret 
Puram, Esther M. 
Rescorla, Barbara Louise 
Rieder, Jean 
Ryker, Phyllis Mignon 
Sarros, Elaine Patricia 
Savage, Mary Louise 
Say, Jeanne Carol 
Schon, Sandra Jean 
Seuling, Jean 
Siu, Mabel K. H. Yang 
Smith, Rella Jacqueline 
Soler, Generosa 
Springer, Ruth Mae 
Stetson, Mary Anne 
Stickney, Sandra Jane 



Middletown, N. Y. 
Evanston, 111. 
Atlantic City, N.J. 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Hamden, Conn. 
Jim Thorpe, Pa. 
Laurelton, N. Y. 
Pleasantville, N. Y. 
Larchmont, N. Y. 
Westfield, N. J. 
Darien, Conn. 
Riverhead, N. Y. 
West Orange, N. J. 
Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
West Chester, Pa. 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Mineola, N. Y. 
Little Neck, N. Y. 
Piffard, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ancon, Canal Zone 
Great Neck, N. Y. 
Lewisburg, Pa. 



College from which 
Transferred 
Colby College 
Douglass College 
Russell Sage College 
University of Massachusetts 
Cedar Crest College 
Hunter College 
Wells College 
Bucknell University 
University of Rochester 
Cornell University 
Pennsylvania State University 
Rivier College 

Douglass College 
Cedar Crest College 
Bucknell University 
University of Illinois 
Washington University 
Drew University 
Hood College 
Cornell University 
Bennett Junior College 
American International 

College 
Centenary Junior College 
Fordham University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Stanford University 
Finch College 
Temple University 
Marymount College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cedar Crest College 
Centenary Junior College 
Cornell University 
Wells College 
Cornell University 
Wheaton College 
Cornell University 
Concordia Coll. Inst. 
Colby College 
Cornell University 
New York University 
Canal Zone Junior College 
Colby College 
Bucknell University 



50 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name 

Tonry, Geraldine Patricia 
Turkow, Margarita 
Wadsworth, Martha Kerr 
Walker, Barbara Jean 
Weatherly, Margaret Payson 
Weinstein, June Marcia 
Weiss, June Elizabeth 
Whelan, Barbara Belle 
Wickens, Nancy Bevan 
Zelno, Bernadine Alice 
Ziegler, Elizabeth Rebecca 



Address 

New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Manhasset, N. Y. 
Baldwin, N. Y. 
Mamaroneck, N. 
Brooklyn, N.Y, 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Malverne, N. Y. 
Groton, Mass. 
Eynon, Pa. 
Lewisburg, Pa. 



College from which 
Transferred 
Marymount College 
City College 
Cornell University 
University of Maine 
Cornell University 
Drew University 
Houghton College 
Cedar Crest College 
Bates College 
Marywood College 
Bucknell University 



! 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the School as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible background 
preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 

Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information which 
will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing school 
entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 



Date diploma received or expected 
ollege: name and location 



Date on w^hich I expect to have completed at least two years of college 

19.... 

'lease send me an application blank 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the Hospital or to the University with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"I give and bequeath to The Soeiety of the New York Hospital 
(or 'T give and bequeatJi to Cornell University" ) the sum of 

S for the Cornell University-New 

York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift to the School of Nursing shall be 
made in whole or in }Dart for any specific purpose in the pro- 
gram of the School such use may be specified. 



INDEX 



Abseiucs, 15 

Accroiiitalioii ol llic School, 5 

Activities, 15-17; Nmscs Residence. 15- 
l(i; Aiiininae Association, 18; recrea- 
lion, Ki; niairiagc and residence, 17; 
sdiool goveinnicnt, 17; connseling 
services, 17-18 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
34-46 
I Admission. 10; general rcqnirements, 
10; selection of a college. 10; ediua- 
tion requirements, 11; age and health, 
12; application, 12; Cornell advisory 
committee on pre-nursing. 36 

Ahnnnae Association, 18, 35 

Anatomy, 21, 28 

Application for admission, 12, 51 

Assistant Professors, 37-38 

Assistants in Instruction, 42-43 

Associate Professors, 37 

Associated with the faculty, 42-46 

Basic musing program. 18; professional 

curriculum. 18-22 
Biochemistry, 21, 28 
Biological and physical sciences, 28 

Calendar. 3 

Clinics, 8-9 

College. S;!lection of, 10 

Committee for Scholarships. 25, 35 

Coininunity and the Nurse, 21, 28 

Contents, 2 

Core Comse in Operating Room, Smgi- 
cal and Out-Patient Nursing. 21, 30 

Cornell University, .5-6; degree, 14; ad- 
visory committee on pre-nursing stu- 
dents. 36; Medical College faculty. 41 

Council of the School. 34 

Counseling services, 17 

Courses, description of. 28-33 

Curriculum, professional, 18-22 

Degree, 14 

Description of coinses. 28-33 



Diet 1 herapy, 21, 22, 31 

Karly Child Development. 21. 28 
Kchicalional requirements. 11-12 
I'.meritus Professors, 37 
Kxpenses, 23-25 

I'adHties for iusiiuclion. 7 10 

I'aculty, 37-41, associated witli, 12-46, 
committee of, 35 

Facidty Instructors, 39-41 

I'ees and expenses, 23; method of pay- 
ment, 24; maintenance, 24 

Financial aid, 25-27 

Fundamentals of Nursing and alhcd 
coinses, 21, 30; Orientation, 21, 30 

(.raduation, 13-1 1; degree, 1 1 
C.ynecologic nursing, 21, 32 

Head nurses. 44-45 
Health .service. 14-15 
History of School, .5-7 
Historical Backgrounds of Nursing, 21. 
29 

Instructors, 39-41 

Joint Administrative Board, 34 

Lecturers, 43 

Libraries, 7-8 

Loan Fund, 26 

Long Term Illness. 22, 30 

Maintenance, 24 
Marriage, 17 

Maternity Nursing, 21. 32 
Medical Nursing, 21, 31 
Microbiology, 21, 28 

Neurological nursing. 31 

New York Hospital, 5-10; nursing super- 
visors, 43-44; head nurses. 44-45; 
staff. 43-46 



58 



54 



INDEX 



29 



Nurse in Public Health, 22, 

Nurses Residence, 7, 15-16 

Nursing, Fundamentals ot-and allied 

courses, 21, 30 
Nutrition, 31 

Obstetric (Maternity) Nursing, 21, 32 
Officers of administration, 35 
Operating Room Nursing, 21, 32; Core 

Course, 21,30 
Orientation, 21, 30 
Orthopedic Nursing, 30 
Out-Patient Department, 9, 20 
Out-Patient Nursing, 21, 29; Core 

Course, 21,30 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 9 

Pediatric Nursing, 22, 33 

Pharmacology, 21, 30 

Physical Education, 21, 33 

Physiology, 21, 28 

Professional Problems, 22, 29 

Professors, 37, 41 

Program, basic musing, 18 

Promotion and graduation, 13-14; De- 
gree. 14 

Psychiatric Nursing, 22, 33 

Psychosocial and Cultural Aspects of 
Nursing, 21, 28 

Public health affiliations. 9-10. 20, 46 

Public Health Nursing, 9-10, 22, 29 



Recreational facilities, 16 
Registration, State, 5 
Residence facilities, 15-16 

Scholarships, 25-27 

School government, 17 

School of Nursing, administrative offi- 
cers, 35; faculty committee, 35 

Senior Experience, 22, 31 

Social Sciences, 28 

Social Service Departments, 45 

State registration, 5 

Student life and activities, 15-18 

Students now in School, 47-50 

Supervisors, nursing, 43-44 

Surgical Ninsing, 21, 32; Core Course, 
21, 30 

Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuberculosis Ninsing, 30 
Tuition, 23 

Uniforms, 23, 24-25 

Urological Ninsing, 22, 32 ■ 

\'acations. 15 

\'isiting Nurse Service of New York, 9, 

46 
Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn, 

9, 46 



I 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1958-1959 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 
ELL UNIVERSITY- NEW YORK HOSPITAl 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



TERM DATES 1958-1959 

Sept. 22, 1958 -Dec. 14, 1958 

Dec. 15, 1958 -March 8, 1959 

March 9, 1959 -May 31, 1959 

June 1, 1959-Sept. 20, 1959 /■ 

Sept. 21, 1959-Dec. 13,1959 ^ 



51 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1 he Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
situated in New York City between York Avenue and the East 
River from 68th to 71st Streets, is part of The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center. 

The office of the Dean is on the second floor of the Ninses Resi- 
dence, 1320 York Avenue, at the corner of 70th Street. This may be 
reached by taking the 65th Street crosstown bus (M-7) east-bovmd, 
to York Avenue and 70th Street. These buses connect with all north 
and south bound transit lines. 

Telephone: TRafalgar 9-9000 (Ext. 125) 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Published by Cornell Uni^el-sity at Ithaca, New York, every two weeks through- 
out the calendar year. Volume 50. Number 3. July 30, 1958. Second-class mail 
privileges authorized at the post office at Ithaca, New York, December 14, 1916, 
under the act of August 24, 1912. 

A list of the Announcements luill be jound on the inside back cover. 



Cornell University- New York Hospital 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1958-1959 

1320 YORK AVENUE, NEW YORK 21, N.Y. 



CONTENTS 

Calendar 3 

The Preparation of Today's Professional Nurse . . 4 

Accreditation 5 

State Registration for Graduates 5 

History 5 

Facilities for Instruction 7 

Admission 10 

Promotion and Graduation 13 

Health Service 14 

Vacations and Absences 15 

Student Life and Activities 15 

Basic Nursing Program 18 

Fees and Expenses 23 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 25 

Description of Courses 28 

Administration 34 

Faculty , • • 36 

Associated with the Faculty 42 

Students in the School 47 

Index 53 



CALENDAR 



Sept. 13 Saturday 

Oct. 13 Monday 

Nov. 27 T Inns day 

Nov. 28 Friday 

Dec. 20 Saturday 

Dec. 25 Thursday 



1958 

Registration Day 

Holiday for Columbus Day (for all students ex- 
cept Freshmen)* 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Holiday: Freshmen only 

Christmas recess begins for Freshmen 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1959 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

Holiday for Washington's Birthday 

Holida) for Memorial Day 

Commencement Day 

Holiday for Independence Day 

Holiday: Labor Day 

Registration Day 

Holiday: Columbus Day 

Holida}: Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas recess begins for Freshmen 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1960 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 

Holiday: \V'ashington's Birthday 

Holiday: Memorial Day 

Holiday: Independence Day 

Freshmen will receive this holiday on Friday, Xoy. 28. 1958. 



Jan. 


1 


TJiursday 


Jan. 


4 


Sunday 


Feb. 


23 


Monday 


May 


29 


Friday 


June 


3 


JVednesday 


July 


3 


Friday 


Sept. 


7 


Monday 


Sept. 


12 


Saturday 


Oct. 


12 


Monday 


Nov. 


26 


Thursday 


Dec. 


19 


Saturday 


Dec. 


25 


Friday 


Jan. 


1 


Friday 


Jan. 


3 


Sunday 


Feb. 


22 


Monday 


May 


30 


Monday 


July 


4 


Monday 



THE PREPARATION OF TODAY'S 
PROFESSIONAL NURSE 



Nursing represents one of the vital forces for health in today's society. 
The nursing needs of people range from the simplest to the most com- 
plex. Persons with widely varying preparation may help to meet these 
needs, but the professional nurse is the key person in the total picture of 
nursing service. This service includes promotion of health, prevention of 
disease, and treatment of sickness; it should reach individuals in the 
hospital, the home, the school, and on the job. 

The professional nurse who is to function in the pivotal position in' 
this total service must have a preparation which is different from that 
offered by the majority of nursing schools. The rapid increase in scien- 
tific knowledge and the broadened scope of therapy alone would make 
this essential. Added to this are the special problems growing out of the 
wider spectrum of ages to be cared for, since modern medicine provides 
greater health opportunities for the newborn and the aged. The present' 
concept of rehabilitation which accepts as an aim optimum recovery foi 
each person demands from the nurse factual knowledge based on the 
various sciences, trained insight to recognize possibilities, and skill in 
interpreting this information to her patient. 

Continuing research into the behavioral sciences (e.g., sociology, cul- 
tural anthropology and social psychology) points the way to anothei 
field in which the nurse must be prepared. These sciences offer resources 
essential in helping her work effectively not only with patients but with 
professional practitioners in related fields, and with less well-prepared 
assistants whom she must guide in nursing care. This responsibility of 
teaching and directing auxiliary personnel is inherent in the work of 
every professional nurse today, though unknown only a few years ago. 

The purpose of this program is to prepare a practitioner who, immedi- 
ately upon graduation, can function, with guidance, in any beginning 
position in professional nursing; who is able to help in meeting one of 
today's greatest health problems, that of finding new and better ways of 
providing nursing care for a rapidly expanding population; who car 
proceed without loss of time or credit should she desire to prepare her 
self for teaching, administration or research, fields in which there is acute 
need; whose general education is sufficiently broad to make her an ef- 
fective member of her community. 



ACCREDITATION 

The School is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing 
(Accrediting Service) and is one of a small gioup of schools accredited as 
preparing for beginning public health nurse positions as well as for posi- 
tions in the other fields. This is an important factor in the employment 
status of giaduates of the School not only in positions which are specifi- 
cally public health but in others as well, since the accreditation is on the 
basis of the total progiam. 



STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 



m 

ki 
red 
•no! 

tlif 

'nil 

tll3I 

ciei i 

^^^ I Graduates who are citizens or who have legally declared intention of 

^ becoming citizens are eligible for admission to the examination for licen- 
■jl sure administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are ex- 
pected to take the first examination given after completion of the nursing 
^ -Icourse. Satisfactory completion of this examination classifies the graduate 
' i pi the School as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in the State of New York. If 
citizenship is not completed within seven years from the declaration 
of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

Graduates of the School are urged to take State Board examinations 

in New York State. Those wishing to practice elsewhere may then apply 

for registration either by reciprocity or by examination, depending on 

■4 the laws of the particular state. 



m 



HISTORY 



The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing was 
stablished as a School in Cornell University in 1942, on the 65th an- 
.Iniversary of the founding of The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
„ one of die earliest nursing schools in the country. The School is part of 
J^ The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center which includes also 
the Cornell University Medical College and the various adjoining build- 
kings of The New York Hospital extending from 68th to 71st Streets on 
ithe East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society of the New York 
Hospital and Cornell University, committed to a four-fold purpose in 
(1) care of the sick, providing the same wisdom and skill to rich and 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

poor, (2) education of doctors and nurses, research workers, technician; 
and others who will work in the field of medical science; (3) research tc 
extend the boundaries of knowledge in the health fields; (4) promotioi 
of public health through the development of preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second oldest voluntary hospital in thi; 
country, its Royal Charter having been granted in 1771, in the reign o 
King George III. The first patients were soldiers wounded in the Revolu 
tionary M^ar. At that time the Hospital w^as located on the lower end o 
Manhattan, the only part of the City then settled, and on early maps th( 
location was designated simply as "the Hospital." i 

Cornell University with its campus in Ithaca, New York, received it 
charter in 1865, nearly 100 years after the Hospital had been chartered; 

Three circumstances contributed to the founding of the University ii , 
the eventful years that marked the close of the Civil War. In the firs 
place, Ezra Cornell, a citizen of Ithaca, had come into a large fortune 
from his holdings in the newly formed Western Union Telegraph Com 
pany and had devoted a great deal of thought to the good that might b(i 
done by giving his wealth to education. A second circumstance was th(j 
fact that the State of New York had received a substantial land grant 
under the Morrill Act of 1862, for the support of colleges teaching 
agriculture and the mechanical arts. The third circumstance was tha 
Mr. Cornell had as a colleague in the state legislature of 1864-1865 i 
young senator named Andrew D. White, later to become the first presi 
dent of the University, who had the vision of preserving the state's lan( i 
grant intact for a single great institution which should teach not onr 
agriculture and the mechanical arts but the humanities and the science 
as well. 

The Medical College and the School of Nursing are the two school , 
of the University which are located in New York City. I 

The Hospital had been operating for over 100 years before a schoo 
for the training of nurses was opened. There had been early steps taken 
however, to improve the care given to patients and even in 1799, Dr 
Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician had organized .' 
series of lectures combined with a course of practical instruction in th< 
wards which was given to the women who were engaged by the Hospita 
at that time as "watchers" and "nurses." Although the theoretical con 
tent was meager and the practical instruction not systematically planned 
these classes focused attention on the fact that women who had some 
preparation for their work gave better care than those without instruc 
tion. When in 1873 the first training school in this country on th( 
Nightingale pattern was opened at Bellevue Hospital, the Governor 
of The Society of the New York Hospital contributed to its support 
Four years later, in 1877, when the Hospital moved to new buildings 



[tU! 

Con 

IS 



toi 
ienci 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 7 

^^DilThe New York Hospital Training School for Nurses was opened in 
-M [quarters which were considered to have all the modern improvements of 
' 'blithe times. The School moved to the present location when the present 

Medical Center was opened in 1932. 
t^ I Early in the Hospital's history it pioneered in such steps as introducing 
!''<J temperature charts and anesthetics, in the use of vaccination for small- 
•J'U'pox, and in humane methods in the care of the mentally ill. Today the 
^^« 'Center continues to pioneer in the improvement of patient care. In 
-^^Itoday's pioneering, a significant factor is the quality of the nursing which 
must keep abreast with developments in the biological, physical and 
dit social sciences. New methods (such as open heart surgery, and use of the 
ered iartificial kidney) and new approaches (such as family centered maternity 
'f^ ii fcare and helping the mother of a hospitalized child to play a greater part 
■ ^ in the child's care) are examples of changes which require new methods 

mlin nursing as well. 

The health needs of the community and country have been the guid- 

tuling force in the development of the School which has strengthened its 

tiniprogram to keep pace with these needs. Today the work of the profes- 
;rani isional nurse requires a great deal more of her than in the past and in 
(■^ recognition of this, the University program was established in 1942. 
jilu Since 1946, all students admitted to the School have been in the degree 
JWiiprogram and the School is now one of the largest collegiate schools of 
pres iiursing in the country. An endowment fund for the School was begun 
'Min 1951 which as it grows will further safeguard the progress of the 

d1 School for future development. 



:' 



AGILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 



takei This Medical Center provides a setting in which there are opportuni- 
i9,Di ties of great value to students in the health fields. It includes laboratories 
lizedi and libraries with extensive holdings, and offers an environment which 
intl promotes a spirit of inquiry. It encompasses services to patients reflect- 
3spia ing modern concepts of care and newer knowledge of health and disease. 
ilcoi Learning experiences in the Center are augmented by observations and 
jnnd >ractice in other community agencies. 
hoi 

ti LIBRARIES 






The library of the School contains a wide selection of materials per- 
tinent to nursing and related fields, and includes important medical 



8 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

and nursing periodicals, both current and in reference sets of bound 
volumes. There are additional small collections in each department near 
the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors. The library is 
under the direction of a committee of the faculty, and in the charge of a 
professional librarian. The facilities of the Medical College Library are 
also readily accessible and make valuable supplementary materials avail- 
able to both the students and faculty of the Nursing School. In addition, 
the broad resources of the New York Public Library, the National Health 
Library, and many other special libraries in the city may be called upon 
whenever needed. 



CLINICAL SERVICES 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital and the Hospital 
for Special Surgery (Orthopedic) provide unusual opportunity for the 
care and study of patients. The New York Hospital is comprised of five 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided 
not only with facilities adequate in every way for the care of both in- 
patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching and for 
the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized clinical serv- 
ices are therefore available which are seldom found within a single 
organization. The Hospital has a capacity of 1,206 beds and annually 
approximately 30,000 patients are hospitalized and 45,000 treated as 
out-patients. The conduct of research in all clinical departments gives 
the student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the 
part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects. 
Authenticity of the findings in many studies depends to no small degree 
on the accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to general 
medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of 
tuberculosis, neurology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and throat 
disorders, plastic and neuro-surgery, ophthalmology, and a fracture 
service. The Lying-in Hospital has a capacity of 206 adults and 102 new- 
borns and provides for obstetric and gynecologic patients. Each year 
approximately 4,000 babies are born in this Hospital. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 96 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. Facili- 
ties for the recreation of convalescent children and the services of an 
occupational therapist offer opportunities for the nursing student to 
study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick chil- 
dren. All students have Nursery School experience. Here the student 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 9 

works with and observes the development of the well child, and is thus 
better able to evaluate deviations in behavior which may accompany 
illness. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity of 
108 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational and 
recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of psychiatric 
patients. The close association between the psychiatric, medical and 
nursing staff and the staffs of the other clinical departments on a con- 
sultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the relationship 
between mental and physical illness throughout her experience in the 
Hospital. 

The Out-Patient Department with its 86 clinics provides opportunity 
for the study of a large number of patients who come for general health 
supervision, diagnosis of disease and for treatment of disease that can 
be conducted on an ambulatory basis. Each year more than 250,000 pa- 
tient visits are made to this Department. 

Students assist in diagnostic tests, in treatments and in teaching pa- 
tients so that care without hospitalization can be effective. Arrangements 
for continuity of care through use of referrals to public health nursing 
agencies are an essential part of clinic experience. Opportunity is pro- 
vided for participation in the teaching of expectant parents through 
special classes and individual conferences and for study of the family 
approach to health maintenance and care of children. 

The Hospital for Special Surgery provides care and carries out research 
and teaching related to the needs of patients with orthopedic and rheu- 
matic diseases. It has a capacity of 170 beds and 55,000 visits are made 
annually by patients who are being treated in the many special clinics 
of the Out-Patient Department. Nursing students have an opportunity 
to participate in the care of patients of all ages who are affected by a wide 
range of problems. 

Public Health nursing field experience is provided in The Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York, The Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 
and, through the New York State Department of Health, with West- 
chester County Health Department. These agencies provide opportunity 
for the student to learn the application of public health principles in 
both voluntary and official agencies. 

Representatives of various governmental, voluntary and coordinating 
agencies plan with the faculty for appropriate ways to contribute to the 
student's knowledge of the community and of community organization 
for human services. 



ADMISSION 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF REQUIREMENTS 

Nursing requires women of integrity and intelligence who have a deep 
interest in public service. Candidates are selected whose credentials 
indicate high rank in health, scholarship, maturity, ability to work with 
people, and who give evidence of personal fitness for nursing. A mini- 
mum of two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive of Physical 
Education) is required for admission. 

SELECTION OF A COLLEGE FOR THE FIRST TWO YEARS 

To meet the requirement of two years of college for admission, a very 
wide choice of colleges is available as the content of these two years is 
general liberal arts and may be taken in any university, college, or junior 
college accredited by one of the regional associations of colleges and 
secondary schools. Applicants may therefore take the first two years at 
any one of a great many colleges throughout the coinitry or in one of 
the colleges of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The work of the 
first two years required for admission to this School contains no nursing 
or "pre-nursing" courses and, therefore, selection of a college in which 
to take the first two years is NOT dependent upon its offering a pre- 
luirsing program. 

Help in the selection of a college may be obtained by referring to the I 
list of "Students in the School" which appears at the back of our School 
of Nursing bulletin as this list indicates the colleges from which students 
now in the School of Nursing have transferred. The list is, however, not 
a complete list of the colleges from which students may transfer. 

In selecting a college and registering for the courses of your first two 
years, read carefully the following section on "Educational Requirements 
for Admission." 

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Within the two-year liberal arts program of the first two college years 
required for admission, only 15 credits are in specified subjects as 
follows: 

Required: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

10 



ADMISSION 11 

Recommended: 



Students are urged to obtain a course in sociology or social anthro- 
pology- Other subjects which are especially helpful but in which there 
is no specified requirement are: 

English, Literature, Human Relations, History. 
Desirable: 



Subjects next in importance depending upon the special interest and 
abilities of the student and the courses available are: 

Languages (may be of particular usefulness with patients and' also 
for the many opportunities in international work and in ad- 
vanced study) 

Economics, Physics 

Art, Music 

Additional courses in physical or biological sciences (for students 
taking more than 60 credits) 

However not more than 12 hours of biological science can be 
accepted toward meeting the 60 credit hours required for 
admission. 

The program in the School of Nursing requires the student to have 
a good background in English composition, communications skills, and 
use of the library. Should a student prove markedly deficient in com- 
munication skills she may be required to strengthen her background by 
taking courses at a nearby university. Courses which are 7iot accepted 
as fulfilling the 6-hour credit requirements in biological sciences are 
human anatomy, physiology, and bacteriology, as these courses are 
included in the professional program after admission to the School of 
Nursing. In general the principle applies that those courses given within 
the School of Nursing cannot be credited toward meeting admissions 
requirements because there is no allowance within the School of Nurs- 
ing program for electives which can be substituted for courses already 
taken. 

Students on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca should confer 
early with their advisors in the college in which they are registered or 
with the Office of the Dean of Women. Advisors will be glad to assist in 
planning a desirable program. These students as well as students in col- 
leges other than Cornell should, however, communicate with the School 
of Nursing as indicated under "Application for Admission." Each time 
you register for your courses during your first two years, it is suggested 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

that you take this bulletin with you and review this section with your 
advisor. Applicants who do not meet in full the specific subject require- 
ments for admission, but who have a good record of two or more years 
of college are encouraged to communicate with the School of Nursing 
for review of their credits and possible assistance in arranging for courses 
which can be taken in summer sessions. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifications, 
there are not definite age limits. In general, however, it has proven de- 
sirable for applicants to be between the ages of 18 and 35 years. The 
results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a dental 
examination must be submitted at the time of application. Vaccination 
against poliomyelitis before admission is strongly urged. Inoculation 
against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox are required of 
all students. In addition the applicant must have a Schick Test and if 
the reaction is positive must be immunized against diphtheria before 
admission. 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nursing, 
containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the form at 
the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. Ap- 
plicants for admission should include with their application the appli- 
cation fee. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain psycho- 
metric tests are required before admission. The applicant is asked to 
meet the charge of $10.00 for these tests. 

A personal interview is considered an important part of the applica- 
tion procedure. Effort is made to have the applicant meet with a member 
of the Committee on Admissions at the School in New York. If this is 
not practicable, a conference can often be arranged with an alumna or 
other qualified person living near the applicant's home or college. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants contact the School as early 
as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their programs 
in high school and college to gain the best possible educational back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal application 
should be made during the first term of the first college year if the appli- 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 13 

cant plans to enter this school after her second college year. When all 
application forms are received, including the report of the psychometric 
test and a transcript covering the first year of college work, and these 
appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted and a place in 
the class held for her pending completion of the remaining requirements. 
A candidate for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon notifi- 
cation of this acceptance to the School. The full amount is credited 
toward the graduation fee. The deposit is not refundable if the applicant 
does not register. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

Each term is 12 weeks in length and the established system of grading is 
a scale of F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. An average of C 
for each term is required for promotion without condition. A grade of C 
is required in the course Fundamentals of Nursing. A grade below C in 
any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average which is less than 
C places a student on condition. This must be removed by the end of the 
next term to insure further promotion. 

A grade of 1 (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the judg- 
ment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she can 
complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable period of time. 

An F (Failure) in any subject may necessitate withdrawal from the 
School unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, in 
which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the instruc- 
tor, if the course is available. With faculty approval a similar course may 
be taken at another university in the city, if not available at this School. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the stu- 
dent to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory to it, 
A charge of |2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a Pro- 
motion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice, rela- 
tionships with patients and co-workers, and general development are 
factors. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her work 
or who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the qualifica- 
tions which are important for a good nurse may be put on condition or 
asked to withdraw from the School. The School reserves the privilege of 



14 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

retaining only those students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy 
the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal suitability for 
nursing. 

Parents or guardians of students are advised when students are placed 
on condition or asked to leave the School. However, in general, the 
School reports only to students. Each student is kept informed of her 
progress through frequent examinations, reports and conferences, and 
every effort is made to provide assistance and guidance which will help 
her to succeed. When it seems advisable a student may be asked to with- 
draw from the program without having been on condition. 



DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University. In order to qualify for the degree, the student must maintain 
a cumulative average of C for the total program, and must have com- 
pleted satisfactorily all of the theory and practice outlined in this 
Announcement or required by decision of the faculty. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Good health is of the utmost importance and students have readily 
available to them a well-organized health service which is maintained in 
cooperation with the health service of the Center. Provision is also made 
for hospital care. 

Upon admission to the School a physical examination by the school 
physician and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest X-ray is 
required every six months, and a physical examination during each 
school year. The Mantoux test is given during the first term. Students 
receive dental health service consisting of a series of full-mouth X-rays, 
examination by a dentist, a written diagnosis with suggestions for treat- 
ment, and follow-up supervision. For repair of dental defects, students 
are referred to their own dentists. 

In the event of short-term illness requiring bed care, students are ad- 
mitted to a special floor of The New York Hospital which is maintained 
for this purpose. If more seriously ill, students are cared for on other 
floors of the Hospital within the limits of the Hospital's policy on ad- 
missions and bed usage, and hospitalization up to the amount of eight 
weeks for any one admission is provided. Elective surgery and dental 
work are not included and if not taken care of before admission to the 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 15 

School must be arranged during vacations. Expenses for private nurses, 
transfusions and personal items are borne by the student. The School re- 
serves the right to collect all hospitalization benefits available through 
third parties for any period of care coming within the provisions of these 
benefits. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a student's 
health makes it unwise for her to remain in the School, she may be re- 
quired to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any time. 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 

There is a vacation of five weeks in the first year, two weeks of this 
being given at Christmas time. In the second year there is a four-week 
vacation. All vacations are arranged to conform to the requirements of 
the program but usually fall within the Summer months. 

Because of the nature of assignments, a leave of absence usually neces- 
sitates absence for an entire term. As a result of absence, a student may be 
required to re-register for a course of study or a nursing practice period, 
or she may be transferred to a later class. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence adjacent to the Hospital. Every 
effort has been made in the construction and equipment of the Residence 
to provide for the normal and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are located 
on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively furnished single 
rooms with running water. Each floor has ample baths, showers, and 
toilet facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoining 
kitchenette for informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, provisions for this development in the life 
of the student have been made. 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch 
of the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

A large auditorium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sun 
roofs and television sets are also available. There are pianos for student 
use. Student activities planned jointly with the Cornell University 
Medical College are a regular part of the recreation and include glee 
club and dramatic productions. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach equip- 
ment and an outdoor grill are available. To insure the full benefit of 
proper use of these facilities, a Residence Director and a well-qualified 
instructor in Physical Education are in charge. Guest rooms are usually 
available for friends and relatives at a reasonable charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless in 
music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Students enjoy the benefits of 
such opportunities as membership in the Metropolitan Opera Guild. 
Theatre tickets are often available through the Residence facilities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," three 
times a year. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The Blue 
Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with \oluntary memberships for both 
medical and nursing students, the Nurses' Christian Fellowship and the 
Newman Club. Guest speakers and planned forums provide an opportu- 
nity for exchange of thought on many subjects. 



SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule which 
is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all students. The 
Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, Judicial Coun- 
cil and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on Student Affairs 
acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organization and, with the 
Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty meetings which provide 
for informal discussions of school activities and problems. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 17 

MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one or 
more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater prob- 
lem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course of study, 
freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature is important. 
For this reason it is held to be the responsibility of a student who is con- 
templating marriage during her period in the School to discuss her pro- 
posed plans well in advance with the Dean and to obtain permission to 
remain in the School. 

Under certain conditions, including approval of location near the 
Center, permission to live outside the Residence may be granted to a 
married student provided, in the judgment of the School, this will not 
interfere with the student's School responsibilities. The faculty record 
their belief that responsibility for maintaining the quality of her work 
and for continuing participation in School activities must be accepted 
by the student. A married applicant, if accepted, may be asked to live in 
the Residence for at least the first six months. 

Students anticipating marriage are expected to make plans which will 
fit into their regular vacation or school schedule as leave of absence can 
rarely be granted except for an entire term. 



COUNSELING SERVICES 

The School maintains active counseling services which are available 
to any student who needs assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in her normal work in the School or in con- 
nection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students assists students in every way possible in 
their educational and personal-social adjustment. She also cooperates 
with the faculty in helping the students in these areas and directs them 
to those members of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for any 
student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase of her 
life while in the School of Nursing. 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 



18 SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the ten 
alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national profes- 
sional organization of nurses, now known as the American Nurses' Asso- 
ciation. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part of the Cornell 
University Alumni Association. 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 10-12. 

Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry— (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects . 45 
Total (Pre-Professional) 60 

PROFESSIONAL (32 months). In the School of Nursing. 

General Education Courses 15.5 

Professional Nursing Major 81.5 

Total 97 

GrandTotal (required for B.S. in Nursing) 157 

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

In keeping with the philosophy underlying the program, the admis- 
sion requirements and the curriculum have been planned to help each 
student attain the following objectives: 

To grow toward becoming a mature individual as evidenced by self- 
motivation, self-direction, willingness to assume responsibility for her 
own actions, and the development of a set of values worthy of a profes- 
sional person and a good citizen. 

To develop as a person who is sensitive to the needs of others and who 
can establish effective relationships and gain satisfaction and happiness 
from her daily activities. 

To develop a concept of nursing as encompassing not only the care of 
the sick but the prevention of illness and the promotion of health for the 
individual and the community. 



\ 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 19 

To become professionally competent and technically skilled; capable 
of drawing upon the humanities and the natural and social sciences to 
make reasoned judgments in the practice of her profession. 

To gain appreciation of the place of nursing in today's society and 
ability to interpret it to others; to see her personal responsibilities as a 
member of the nursing profession. 

The professional curriculum covers a period of 32 months. In each 
term related classes, conferences, and clinical practice are concurrent and 
emphasis is placed on disease prevention, health instruction and reha- 
bilitation. Throughout the program there is emphasis on community 
nursing, and the student has early contact with various agencies assisting 
with health problems. She participates in discussions centering arojand 
family health and assists in the referral of patients requiring nursing 
care after hospital discharge. 

The first two terms are devoted primarily to class and laboratory 
assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the pavilions 
of the Hospital. During the next four terms the student is assigned to 
selected clinical areas for theory and related practice. These include the 
Out-Patient Department, the Operating and Recovery Rooms, Medi- 
cine, Surgery and Obstetrics. 

In the Out-Patient Department the student has an opportunity to 
learn something of the medical and nursing needs of patients who are, 
for the most part, carrying on their usual life activities, while being 
treated for some health problem, or learning to live with some physical 
limitation. She is assigned to the clinics of medicine, surgery and pedi- 
atrics. During her in-patient experience on the medical and surgical 
services, she has experience not only on the "general" services but in 
such specialties as ophthalmology, neurology, neuro-surgery and oto- 
laryngology. 

It is not anticipated that the student will develop a high degree of 
technical skill in the Operating Room. However, through supervised 
practice and observations at the field of operation, by participating in 
the care of patients in the Recovery Room, and by following selected 
patients through their total operative experience, the ground work is 
laid for understanding of patients' nursing needs, not only during oper- 
ation, but immediately preceding and following it. 

In the Woman's Clinic, assignments for practice include activities 
related to the newer concepts of maternal and newborn care, embodied 
in such terms as "preparation for parenthood" and "rooming-in." The 
student has experience in the Out-Patient Department, delivery floor, 
nursery and rooming-in units. 

When the student reaches the mid-point of her program she begins 



20 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

another four-term unit of theory and related practice. An eight-weel 
affiliation with a public health nursing agency provides an opportunity 
for the student to learn of other health agencies in the community, tc 
care for patients in their homes and to teach members of the family tc 
give necessary care between visits of the nurse. 

During another period of eight weeks the student considers the special 
nursing problems related to long-term illness. She visits various agencies 
and facilities in the community which offer services to the aged and to 
those with special handicaps such as cerebral palsy. A 12-week assign 
ment to the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development in- 
cludes experience in Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant 
floor and the unit for older children. A similar 12-week period is spent 
in the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic where the student has an op- 
portunity to gain a keen appreciation of the causes of mental and emo- 
tional illness, of the ways in which such illness may be prevented, and 
knowledge of the newer methods of therapy for its relief. Experience is 
also provided in Diet Therapy and in Urological and Gynecologic! 
Nursing. 

In the last term the student is ready to accept almost complete re 
sponsibility for analyzing and meeting the nursing needs of selected 
patients. She returns to one of the services on which she had experience 
earlier in her program, and with a minimum of guidance plans and 
carries out the care of patients who present complex nursing problems. 
She functions as leader of the nursing "team" and has charge responsi- 
bility on a pavilion for limited periods of the day, as well as during the 
evening or night. 

Within the clinical department where she is having this term of 
experience, the student, if she desires, may choose a special nursing 
problem to explore in detail. This would include extensive library in- 
vestigation and may take her into any part of the Medical Center or 
into other community agencies. Related classes and seminars provide an 
opportunity for exploration of principles, exchange of ideas, and sharing 
of experiences. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum in 
keeping with the nursing needs of society and the best interests of the 
students and School. 



PR( 



PROGRAM 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 



21 



First Year (Fall Quarter) 



Course 
No. 



Course Title 



120 Orientation 

100 Anatomy; Histology 

101-102 Biochemistry — Physiology 

122 Pharmacology 

105 Early Child Development 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
Cr. 



1.5 

3.5 

0.5 

1.0 



106 The Community and the Nurse 1.0 

121 Fundamentals of Nursing 4.0 

175 Physical Education 



Total 



1 1 .5 



First Year (Winter Quarter) 

Sem. 

Course Hrs. 

No. Course Title Cr. 

1.5 

2.0 

1.5 

107 Psycho-social and Cultural 

Aspects of Nursing I 1.0 

1.0 

3.5 

130 Nutrition 0.5 

Total 11.0 

First Year (Summer Quarter)* 

Sem. 

Course Weeks Hrs. 

No. Course Title Prac. Cr. 

140 Medical Nursing 12 7.5 



(Vacation) 



First Year (Spring Quarter)* 







Sem. 


Course 


Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title Prac. 


Cr. 


150 


Maternity — Gynecologic 






Nursing 12 


8.0 


131 


Diet Therapy and Food 






Preparation 


1.0 


103 


Microbiology 


2.0 


120 


Fimdamentals of Nursing 


1.0 


180 


Physical Education 






Total 



12.0 



Iotai 



12 



7.5 



Second Year (Fall Quarter)' 



Second Year (Winter Quarter)* 









Sem. 






Sem. 


Course 


Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course 


Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title 


Frac. 


Cr. 


No. 


Course Title Prac. 


Cr. 


145 


Surgical Nursing 


12 


5.0 


118 


Nursing in the Out- 




123 


Combined Course in Op- 








Patient Department 6 


3.0 




erating Room, Out- 






148 


Operating Room Nursing 6 


3.5 




patient and Surgical 














Nursing 




2.0 






2.0 


109 


Historical Background of 

Nursing 
Psvcho-social and Cultura 




1.0 






1.0 


108 


1 












Aspects of Nursing I 




1.0 








Total 




12 


9.0 


Total 


12 


9.5 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

PROGRAM (continued) 



Second Year (Spring Quarter)** 



Second Year (Summer Quarter)** 









Sem. 








Sem 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 


No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 


160 


Pediatric Nursing 


12 


8.0 


170 


Psychiatric Nursing 
(Vacation) 


12 


8.0 


Total 




12 


8.0 


Total 




12 


8.0 



Third Year (Fall Quarter)*^ 



Third Year (Winter Quarter)^ 



Libra 
Ui 

ser 

lu 

inifo: 
eait 
liot^ 

iboi; 







Sem. 








Sem. 


Course 


Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title Prac. 


Cr. 


No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 


124 


Nursing in Long-Term 
Illness 8 


4.0 


115 


Principles of Public 
Health and Public 






132 


Diet Therapy Practice 
and Related Confer- 
ences 4 


1.5 


116 


Health Nursing 
Practice of Public Health 
Nursing and Related 
Conferences 


8 


2.0 

3.5 








146 


Orthopedic Nursing 


4 


2.0 


Total 


12 


5.5 


Total 




12 


7.5 



Third Year (Spring Quarter) 



Summary 









Sem. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 


147 


Urological and Gyneco- 
logic Nursing (and 








Team Leadership) 


6 


3.0 


125 


Professional Leadership 








in Nursing Care 


6 


4.5 



Total 



12 



Grand Total 

Credit: 97 Hours 

Clinical Practice: 108 Weeks 

* A student may have courses in any 
** •within quarters which are starred ali 



km 
hi 
iTadu 
:Ca 
ntal 



order 
ke. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

(Subject to variation or change) 

On Approx. Approx. Approx. 

Admission March 15 March 15 March 15 Total 

TUITION AND FEES (6 months) (12mos.) il2mos.) (3 months) 

(Application Fee $10.00) 

Matriculation $ 10.00 S 10.00 

Tuition 140.00 $140.00 $130.00 $ 40.00 450.00 

Public Health Field Ex- 
pense 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library ! 2.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 9.00 

Health and Dental 

Service 10.00 16.00 16.00 3.00 45.00 

Hospitalization Insur- 
ance 4.80 9.60 9.60 2.40 26.40 

Nurserv School 5.00 5.00 

Graduation 25.00* 25.00 

$196.80 $168.60 S223.60 S 71.40 $660.40 
LMFORMS, etc. 

Lniforms &: Accessories $ 93.50 $ 93.50 

)weater 5.75 5.75 

Shoes 13.91 S 13.91 27.82 

Jcissors & Name Pin . . 3.37 3.37 

laboratory Coats 9.00 9.00 

lental Public Health 

Uniforms 7.50 7.50 

Graduate Uniform 

&Cap 10.35 10.35 

lental Cap & Go^vn 2.50 2.50 

S125.53 $ 13.91 S 17.85 S 2.50 S159.79 

* The deposit of $25 paid at time of acceptance is credited as graduation fee and is 
educted from final payment, not refundable if student withdraws before admission or 
oes not complete program. 

Other miscellaneous expenses include books, field trips, g)m suit, and 
Student Organization fee, which for the full program total approxi- 
mately $135.00. See also "Maintenance" and "Uniforms." Special fees are 
charged for the following: For change of schedule, for re-admission or 
irreinstatement following leave of absence— $10; special arrangement for 

23 



24 SCHOOL OF NURSING 



examination— $2; specially scheduled clinical conferences— fee as fori 
tutoring; late payment of fees— $5. For reasons judged adequate in ex 
ceptional circumstances a special fee may be waived by the Dean. 



METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon acceptance for admission, a deposit of S25.00 is required. This 
is credited as the sraduation fee but is not refundable if the student 






east 



withdraws her application or does not finish. On registration day, pay-i 
:ment is due for tuition and fees for the first six months, for the uniforms '^^.' 
and certain other expenses. A statement of fees payable on that day will 
ibe sent to each accepted applicant shortly before registration day. 

The second payment of fees and tuition is due on approximately 
March 15 following admission and covers a 12-month period; the thirc "'^l 
payment is due the following March 15 for a 12-month period; the las 
payment is due on approximately March 15 prior to the June graduatior 
for the last 3-month period. Students are billed in advance. Fees become (^ 
due on the first day of the March term and must be paid not later thar 
20 days after the first day of the term. 

Books, gym suit, and articles listed on page 23 under "Uniforms 
are purchased through the School and obtained after admission in ac 
cord with instructions given to each student on or after admission. A lisi 
of necessary personal equipment will be sent to each accepted applican^dt 
shortly before registration day. 

Students holding hospitalization insurance at the time of admissioi 
are required to take out insurance through the School as required for al ^ 
students. Students pay one half of the cost and the other half is paid b' ftip 
the Hospital. Refunds for policies held on admission may be claimec 
at the office of former policy. 

The School resei-ves the right to change its tuition and fees in amouniWkiio] 
time, and manner of payment as necessary. 






MAINTENANCE 

With the exceptions indicated in this paragraph, each student receive 
maintenance consisting of room, an allowance for meals, and launderin' 
of uniforms. During the first 23 weeks in the School and during the eigh 
weeks she is having experience with the Visiting Nurse Service, the stij 
dent meets the cost of her meals which are paid for as purchased, a| 
approximately 1 14.00 a week. There are four cafeterias in the Cent( 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 25 

where meals may be purchased. During vacations maintenance is not 
provided. 

UNIFORMS 

The bkie plaid chambray uniform of the School, with apron, bib, and 
cap, is worn by the student for all clinical assignments. The tan labora- 
tory coat is worn over street clothes if students return to any floor of the 
Hospital for study outside of their regular assignment. For the public 
licalth nursing assignment, each student is required to provide herself 
with a tailored navy or dark coat and hat or beret appropriate to the 
season, and black or navy blue low^-heeled walking shoes, preferably 
oxfords, and raincoat of conservative color. Other items of uniform for 
hospital and public health assignments are as listed under "Expenses." 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 

Several scholarships administered by the School are available, usually 

_jin amounts of SI 00 to S600, to students in need of financial assistance. 

jThese awards are open to both students entering the School of Nursing 

land those already in the School unless otherwise indicated. Factors taken 

into consideration, in addition to financial need, are the students' all- 

Tound record as indicated by academic work, participation in school 

i land comminiity activities, and qualities indicating promise of growth 

I and potential contribution to nursing. 

Sttidents taking their first two vears of academic work at Cornell in 
Ithaca may obtain additional information on scholarships by writing to 
Scholarship Secretarv, Office of Admissions, Cornell Universitv, Ithaca, 
X.V. 

\Vith the exception of the New York State Regents Scholarships, ap 

plications from entering students are made to the Dean, at the time of 

application for admission to the School. For students already in the 

I School, application is made not later than February 15 for grants to be 

ijused in the period March 15 to March 15. 

; FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS-Established 
and maintained by a committee of women interested in the School of 
Nursing to assist girls who otherwise would not be able to prepare for 
nursing. Several scholarships each year. 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

JULIETTTE E. BLOHME SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an REi 

endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial Til 

to Juliette E. Blohme of the Class of 1922 through a gift of |6,000, the oan 
interest on which may be used in whole or in part each year. 

m 

Hi 
iEG 



VIVIAN B. ALLEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an en- 
dowed fund by a gift of $14,000 from the Vivian B. Allen Foundation, 
Inc., income from which is used to provide scholarship aid annually for 
one or more students in need of financial assistance. 

NORTH COUNTRY COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION SCHOLAR- 
SHIP— Given by the North Country Community Association, Glen 
Head, New York, for an entering student residing in Nassau, Suffolk or 
Queens County, New York, who indicates a potential interest in the field 
of public health nursing as a possible field of interest at some time in the 
future. Amount, $600. 

EMMAJEAN STEEL FULLER FUND-This Fund, begun in 1952 by 
the Class of 1952 in memory of Emma jean Steel Fuller, a former member 
of the Class, is available for an occasional scholarship. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND-Loans are available to students who have 
been in the School at least one term. Applications are made to the Dean. 
Although applications are accepted at any time during the year, students 
are encouraged to plan, as far as possible, for a year at a time and make 
application by February 15 for grants to be used in the period March 15 
to March 15. 



NEW YORK STATE REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarships are available for residents of New York 
State, making application to the high school principal while still a stu- 
dent in high school. All are awarded on the basis of competitive exami- 
nations. The first of the list below is applicable to the full period in the 
School of Nursing but not to the two college years required for admission. 
The other three are applicable for the first two years of college as well as 
for the period in the School of Nursing. 

For more information on any of these, write to the State Education || 
Department, University of the State of New York, Albany, New York, 
requesting the leaflet "Opening the Door to College Study through New 
York State Regents Scholarship Examinations for High School Seniors." 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 27 

REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS FOR BASIC PROFESSIONAL EDUCA- 
7 ION IN NURSING-Amouru, $200-$500 a year depending upon fi- 
nancial need for a maximum of three years. 

REGENTS COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS- Amount, |250-|700 a year 
dc{)ending upon financial need for a maximum of four years. 

REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS IN CORNELL-A tuition-reducing 
scholarship ranging in amount from $100 to 1 1,000 a year depending 
upon financial need for a maximum of five years. 

REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS FOR CHILDREN OF DISEASED AND 
DISABLED VETERANS-Amount, $450 a year for four years. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 13-14) 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY- HISTOLOGY. Designed to acquaint the student with the gross and 
microscopic structure of the human body. Laboratory includes cadaver demonstration 
and microscopic examination of prepared slides. 

Miss WRIGHT and assistants. 

Credit: 3 Hours (70 hours class and laboratory). 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. Consists of a study of the physiological systems and their integra- 
tion into the total functions of the human body. Closely related to the course in 
Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and laboratory. 

Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CHAPIN, Mrs. MacLEOD, Miss ERLANDER. 

Credit: 2 Hours (45 hours class and laboratory). 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY. Designed to acquaint students with some of the fundamental 
principles of physiological chemistry, as these apply to nursing practice. Studies of 
water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism of food, and the 
composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, 
and laboratory. 

Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CHAPIN, Mr. De PETER, Miss ERLANDER. 
Credit: 3.5 Hours (60 hours class and laboratory). 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms. Bacteriology 
and immunology as applied to the agents of infectious diseases. 

Miss WRIGHT and assistants. 

Credit: 2 Hours (45 hours class and laboratory). 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

105. EARLY CHILD DEVELOPMENT. Emphasis is placed upon the growth pat- 
terns of early childhood and upon the emotional and social forces which affect the 
child from birth to six years. 

Faculty from the Departments of Pediatric, Obstetric, Out-Patient Nursing, and the 
Mental Hygiene Consultant. 
Credit: 1 Hour (15 hours class). 

106. THE COMMUNITY AND THE N^/?5£. Introduction to the community through 
field trips, group projects, oral and written reports. 

Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

Credit: 1.5 Hours (25 hours class). 

28 




I'l.iiiuc in nuiNing care is under the guidance of instructors in the various clinical 
departments. 




Individual rooms make it possible for students to plan their time for study or 
recreation. 




During a field assignment in public health nursing, the student goes into the com- 
munity for experience in family health problems and home care of the sick. 




The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, located at 68th Street and the East 
River, covers three city blocks— 68th to 71st Streets— and includes The New York 
Hospital, the Cornell University Medical College and the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing. 



DKSC RlP'l ION OF COURSES 29 

107. PSYCHOSOCIAL AND CULrVRAl. ASPECTS OF NURSI\(. I. Considers the 
ways in which social science concepts and methods may be incorporated and utilized 
in nursing. Deals with cultural, psychological and social components of human be- 
havior with particular emphasis on the way such knowledge may be applied to total 
human care. 

Mrs. MACGRKCiOR and special lecturers. 
Credit: 1 Hour (15 hours class). 

]0S.- PSYCHOSOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF NURSING 11. A more ad 
vanced and intensive exploration of the aspects outlined in Course 107. 

Mrs. MACGREGOR and special lecturers. 
Credit: 1 Hour (15 hours class). 

109. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF NURSING. An overview of the history of 
nursing, tracing particularly what has constituted nursing and conditions and factors 
which have strengthened or weakened it. Presented against a background of the 
developments in religion, science, medicine, hospitals and public health. Readings in 
both primary and secondary sources. 

Miss DUNBAR, Miss McVEY. 
Credit: 2 Hours (30 hours class). 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

115. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 
Study of the public health sciences of epidemiology, vital statistics, environmental 
sanitation, and public health function, organization and administration as they apply 
to public health nursing. 

Miss FRENCH and special lecturers. 
Credit: 2 Hours (30 hours class). 

116. PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING AND RELATED CONFER 
ENCES. Supervised field experience in one of three agencies which offer a generalized 
public health nursing service, the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, the Visiting 
Nurse .Association of Brooklyn, and the Westchester County Health Department. 
Group study of concurrent experience in public health. Examination of programs, 
policies and practices in the light of basic public health principles. Conferences, 
seminars and special projects. 

Mrs. BERGAMINI, Miss MOLE, Miss CLARK, Miss TVRIE, Miss DISOSWA^ , Miss 
FRENCH. 

Credit: 3.5 Hours (30 hours class, 8 weeks practice). 



OUT-PATIENT (AMBULATORY) NURSING 

118. NURSING IN THE OUT PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Nursing care of ambula- 
tory patients, both children and adults, is taught through demonstration and informal 
family and community-centered conferences. Emphasis is placed upon health teach- 
ing, and the use of community resources in insuring comprehensive patient care, and 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

also upon the cooperation of the nurse with other professions in a program for health 
maintenance and for the prevention, control, and rehabilitation of disease. Selected 
clinics provide experience in the pediatric, medical and surgical services. The student 
is helped to understand the value of continuity of patient care through working 
closely with other departments of the Hospital and with community agencies. (See 
Combined Course 123). 

Faculty of the Department of Out-Patient Nursing. 
Credit: 3 Hours (20 hours class, 6 weeks practice). 



FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 
AND ALLIED COURSES 

120. ORIENTATION. Students are introduced to the program of the School, the 
physical facilities of the Center, the plan of dormitory living and the health main- 
tenance program. 

Members of the Faculty and Staff of the Medical Center. 
Credit: Hours (15 hours class). 

121. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING. An introduction to nursing practice designed 
as a foundation for all Clinical Nursing courses. Content is planned to help the student 
develop an imderstanding of the basic components of professional nursing care and of 
the principles underlying procedures commonly used in the treatment of patients. 
Supervised practice on patients' unit. 

Miss LIFGREN, Miss HARTVIGSEN, Miss PEELING, Miss BRESCIA, and others. 
Credit: 8.5 Hours (105 hours class, 130 hours laboratory). 

122. PHARMACOLOGY. Designed to give the student information and methods basic ; 
to administration of medicines; facts and principles of drug therapy, study of com 
monly used drugs, responsibility of the nurse, methods of calculation of dosage. 

Credit: 2 Hours (30 hours class and laboratory). 



u: 



123. COMBINED COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM, SURGICAL AND OUT- ft 

PATIENT NURSING. Focus is on those principles which are basic to the etiology,||it 

prevention and treatment of disease, and on factors which contribute to continuity of iliic 

care in those three services. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Departments of Operating Room, Surgery, and 

Out-Patient. 

Credit: 4 Hours (60 hours class). 



124. NURSING IN LONG TERM ILLNESS. Emphasis is on prevention, care and 
rehabilitation in chronic illness. Consideration is given to the basic needs and prob- 
lems of these patients and to the needs of the nurse in providing comprehensive care. 
Practice in the hospital and field trips to community agencies which cooperate in 
providing care needed by patients with a long term illness. To better assess the needs 
of these patients, students work as partners. Practice is carried out with selected 
patients. Consideration is given to the nurse's relationships with patients and other 
health workers. 

Miss McVEY and others. 

Credit: 4 Hours (33 hours class, 8 weeks practice). 



iie: 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

125. PROFESSIOXAL LEADERSHIP IN NURSING CARE. During the last term of 
the program, the student is guided in considering some of the special responsibilities 
of professional nurses. These include the improvement of patient care through ad- 
ministrative and supervisory technics, through individual and gioup teaching and 
through planned investigation. Professional problems and relationships are explored 
including legislation, education, organizational activities and employment practices. 
The student cares for selected patients who have complex nursing needs and partici- 
i pates in the management of the pavilion. If she desires, she may select and explore in 
detail a special nursing problem in which she is interested. 

Faculty from several departments. 

Credit: 4.5 Hours (45 hours class, 6 weeks practice). 

NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION. Normal adult nutrition based on the courses in Biochemistry and 
Physiology. A study of the functions and food sources of the major food groups, their 
availability in the world and in the community, the needs of the individual and 
relationship of cultural patterns to food habits and nutrition are included. (The 
nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are discussed during the stu- 
dent's practice on pediatric and obstetric services.) 

Miss RYXBERGEX, Miss ERLAXDER. 
Credit: 0.5 Horns (11 hours class). 

131. DIET THERAPY AND FOOD PREPARATION. Designed to present the under- 
Iving principles in the treatment of disease by diet. It is accompanied by laboratory 
work in principles of food preparation, and in the preparation of foods and meals 
included in therapeutic diets. The course is implemented by clinical conferences 
during the student's practice on medical, surgical, obstetric and pediatric services. 

Miss RYXBERGEX, Miss ERLAXDER. 
Credit: 1 Hour (36 hours laboratory). 

132. DIET THERAPY PRACTICE. The application of the principles of diet therapy 
to tb? care and teaching of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the 
Hospital. Through conference discussions, integrated with the practice assignment, 

,the student is oriented to the practical application of her knowledge of nutrition 
land diet therapy in the care of hospitalized and ambulator)- patients. 

Miss RYXBERGEX, Miss ERLAXDER, Miss STEPHEXSOX and staff. 
Credit: 1.5 Hours (8 hours class, 4 weeks practice). 

MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICAL NURSING. The nursing care of patients with medical and neurologi- 
cal diseases is considered. Discussion of medical aspects of disease supplements and 
interprets etiology, symptomatology, usual course pathology, complications, treatments, 
prognosis and prevention. Supervised practice is offered in the application of nursing 
principles to the care of patients on the medical and neurological pavilions of the 
Hospital. Emphasis is on planning nursing care in terms of the individual patient's 
needs and background, as well as his disease. 

Medical and Xursing Faculties of the Department of Medicine. 
Credit: 7.5 Hours (68 hours class. 12 weeks practice). 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SURGICAL NURSING 

145. SURGICAL NURSING. The care of surgical patients is presented by conference^ 
and demonstration. Individualized care, planned instruction, and rehabilitation oli 
the patient are stressed. Planned experience in meeting patients' needs through guideo k 
practice in surgical asepsis, pre- and post-operative teaching and therapeutic team 
relationship. (See Combined Course 123). 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Surgery. 
Credit: 5.0 Hours (30 hours class, 12 weeks practice). 



146. ORTHOPEDIC NURSING. Emphasis is on the responsibilities of the nurse in 
the care, rehabilitation and prevention of crippling disorders. Long-range planning f 
coordinated efforts of the health team and teaching of patient and family are included 
Students participate and observe in the care of selected patients. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Hospital for Special Surgery. 
Credit: 2 Hours (15 hours class, 4 weeks practice). 

147. UROLOGICAL AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Anomalies and diseases o' 
the genito-urinary tract, management, and nursing care. Special consideration of th( 
nursing needs of patients undergoing gynecologic treatment. Planned care during 
pre- and post-operative phases with emphasis on the emotional aspects of such dis 
orders, and preparation for self-care on discharge. Leadership of the nursing team. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the l^epartments of Surgery and Obstetrics-Gyne 

CO logy. 

Credit: 3 Hours (15 hours class, 8 weeks practice). 

148. OPERA TING ROOM NURSING. Students are taught the principles and method; 
of aseptic technique in relation to the care of patients at the time of operation. Prob 
lems in immediate post-operative care are considered. Students observe and assist with 
operative procedures. They are guided in relating this experience to the nursing plar 
for the total care of surgical patients. Experience in Recovery Room is offered at thi' 
time. (See Combined Course 123). 

Faculty of the Department of Operating Room Nursing. 
Credit: 3.5 Hours (32 hours class, 6 weeks practice). 



MATERNITY AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING 

150. MATERNITY NURSING. Focuses on the family as a social unit, the reproductive 
process as it affects personal and family life, and the characteristics of the newborr 
infant. The biological and social sciences are drawn upon in developing principle; 
basic to maternity and gvnecologic nursing. The student is guided toward developing 
increased awareness of the emotional aspects of the entire female reproductive cycle 
Comprehensive care of mothers and infants with related experience in the out-patieni 
clinics, labor and deliverv floor and the rooming-in units. Guided observation of thf 
special health problems of women in the out-patient clinics. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Credit: 8 Hours (78 hours class, 12 weeks practice). 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 



160. PEDIATRIC \URSL\G. A study of the representative disease conditions of 

I infancy and childhood against a background of the normal physical and emotional 

I needs of infants, children, and their families. Guided experiences in the use of knowl- 

""f edge in the care of premature infants, sick infants and chiklren, and of children in 

Nursery School, (.roup conferences, demonstrations and compreh.ensive nursing studies. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Pediatrics. 
Credit: 8 Hours (7.5 hours class, 12 week practice). 



"M PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

170. PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. Historv. pathology and treatment of psychiatric 
illness, and the basic principles involved in the nursing care of patients with person- 
ality disorders, from infancy to old age. The program helps the student develop an 
understanding of self and relationships to others, an objective attitude toward psychia- 
i I trie illness and the nurse's role in helping the patient solve the problems of his illness. 
ill [! Supervised experience in the observation and care of the emotionally ill patient during 
■: • the acute phase of illness and convalescence. Participation in currently approved 
therapies, including psychotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies, and 
somatic therapies. Guided practice in creating a therapeutic and socially rehabilitative 
environment for patients. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Psychiatry. 
Credit: 8 Hours (82 hours class, 12 weeks practice). 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



175. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Teaches the fundamentals of body mechanics, various 
team and individual sports, and modern dance. It aims to develop sufficient skill in 
these activities to enable the student to use leisure time to greater advantage. 

Mrs. H.\ZEL. 

Credit: Hours (52 hours class). 



ADMINISTRATION 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL - 
CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Director 

JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 



Arthur H. Dean ^ ^ , r ^ 

c ^ Board ot 1 rustees o 

Stanton Griffis y ^ ,, xt • 

T>, TA7 A/T Cornell University 

Deane W. Malott J ^ 

Francis Kernan, Chairman ^ Board of Governors ol' 

Hamilton Hadley I The Society of 

Henry S. Sturgis J the New York Hospita%, 

Frederic W. Ecker 



of: 



ILl 



COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

S. S. Atwood, Chairman Provost of Cornell University 

Deane W. Malott President of Cornell University 

Louis M. Loeb "1 Governors of The Society of 

Mrs. Charles S. Payson j the New York Hospital 

Frank Glenn, M.D. President, Medical Board, The New York Hospital 

Mrs. August Belmont Memher-at-Large 

John E. Deitrick, M.D. . . Dean, Cornell University Medical College 

Virginia M. Dunbar, R.N Dean of the School of Nursijigl 

Mrs. Charles Ensign President, Committee for Scholarships 

Joseph C. Hinsey Director, The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 

Ruth Irish Member-at-Large 

Mrs. Thomas Mackie Trustee, Cornell University 

Walsh McDermott, M.D Professor of Public Health and 

Preventive Medicine, Cornell University Medical College 

Lucille Notter, R.N Assistant Director, Visiting 

Nurse Association of Brooklyn 
Elizabeth Ogden^ R.N. . . Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D Director of The New York Hospital 

Mrs. Samuel Rosenberry Member-at-Large 

Howard S. Tyler Professor in Personnel Administration 

New York State College of Agriculture, Cornell University 

34 



ID 
iTi 



ADMINISTRATION 35 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D. President, Cornell University 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Associate Dean 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A Director of the Residence 

Carolyn Diehl, M.D School Physician 

Mrs. Ena Stevens-Fisher Supervisor, Nurses Health Service 

Tracy Dwyer Registrar 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth RiDDiCK Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki Secretary to the Dean 

Mrs. Frances Baillie Secretary to the Associate Dean 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Dorothy Metzger '47 President 

Vf arguerite Plow '30 Executive Secretary 



L 



OMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

ylRS. Charles Ensign President 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
TUDENTS ON THE ITHACA CAMPUS 

)ffice of the Dean of Men, Dean of Women Virginia Pratt 

Vocational Counselor (Chairman) 

lollege of Home Economics Jean Failing 

Professor of Home Economics, Chairman of Counseling Sennce 

lollege of Arts and Sciences F. G. Marcham 

Professor of History 

RoLLiN L. Perry 

Associate Dean 

College of Agriculture . Howard S. Tyler 

rofessor in Personnel Administration (Vocational Guidance Placement) 

ffice of Admissions Robert Storandt 

Associate Director 



FACULTY 



Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., President of llie University 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.\., Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 

Florence Tritt, M.A., R.N., Assistant to the Dean 

Mary Jo Munroe, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Librarian 

Ruth Ernest. M.A., R.N.. Assistant in Admissions 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriett Frost, R.N.. Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Xursing 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N.. Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

Verda F. Hickox. M.A.. R.'S.. Professor Emeritus of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 

Mary Klein, M.A., R.\., Professor Emeritus of Surgical Nursing 



PROFESSORS 

ViR(.iNiA M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of Nursing. 
fA.B.. Mount Holyoke College, 1919: Diploma in Nursing. Johns Hopkins Hospital 
School of Nursing. 1923; M.A., Columbia University. 1930; Diploma. Bedford College 
and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, London, England, 193G.) 

Veronica Lyons, NLA.. R.N., Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean. (Diploma in 1 
Nursing. Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S.. Columbia University, 
1936; M.A., 1947.) 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Elizabeth Brooks, NLA., R.N.. Associate Professor of Medical Nursing; Department 
Head, Medical Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939, B.S., 
1946; NLA., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Muriel Carbery. NLS., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing 
Service. (A.B., Hunter College. 1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing. 1937; NLS., Catholic rni\ersitv of America. 19r)l.) 

Frances C. Maccrecor, M.A., Visiting Associate Professor, Social Science. (A.B., Uni- 
versity of California, 1927; M.A., University of Nlissouri, 1947.) 

Audrey NIcCluskey, NL.\., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Department Head, 
Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 19i4; B.S., Temple University, 1945; NL.\., 
Columbia Uni\ersity, 1948.) 

36 



FACULTY 37 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing; 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 1944.) 

Henderika J. Rynbercen, M.S., Associate Professor of Science. (B.S., Simmons College. 
1922; M.S., Cornell University, 1938.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., K.N ., Associate Prof essor of Pediatric Nursing; Head of Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia University, 1932.) 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Norma Cavaglieri, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing (Mental Health). 
(Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935; B.A., Blue Moun- 
tain College, Blue Mountain, Mississippi; M.A. (Educational Psychology), New York 
University, 1949; M.A. (Mental Health), Columbia University, 1951.) 

Mary Jeanne Clapp, M.N., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing (Orthopedics): 
Director Nursing Service, The Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.A., Mount Holyoke 
College, 1940; M.N., Yale University School of Nursing, 1943.) 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of 
Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Department 
Head, Operating Roo7n Nursing Service. (Diploma, in Nursing, Denver General Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1946; B.A., Toronto University, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 
1957.) 

Helma Fedder, M.N., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942; M.N., University of Washington, 
1954.) 

Lilian Henderson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 
1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Elizabeth Hosford, M.A., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant Professor of Obstetric Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (B.S., Keuka College, 1947; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1952; Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, N.Y., 1953.) 

Vera R. Keane, M.A., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant Professor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Supervisor , Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., Columbia University, 1949; M.A., 
1957; Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, N.Y., 1951.) 

Edna Elizabeth Lifgren, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor in Fundamentals of Nursing. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1941; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1954; M.A., 1957.) 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Eleanor Muhs, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Nursing; Director, Psy 
chiatric Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of Nursing, Roch 
ester, N. Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1954 

M. Eva Paton, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing; Hea<i 
of Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, 1930; Diploma in Nursing 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York University, 1950.) 

Doris Schwartz, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor in Medical Out-Patient Nursing 
Supervisor, Comprehensive Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing 
Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, New York, 1942; B.S., New Yorl 
University, 1953.) 

Laura L. Simms, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Departmen 
Head, Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., Texas State College for Women, Denton, Texas 
1940; Diploma in Nursing, Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas, 1945 
M.Ed., Southern Methodist University, Dallas, 1950.) 

Mary Stewart, M.A., Counselor of Students. (B.A., Elmira College, 1926; M.A., Uni 
versity of Michigan, 1950.) 

Ethel Marie Tschida, M.A.. R.N.. Assistant Professor in Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing 
Super-visor, Pediatric Out-Patient Clinic, (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital Schoo 
of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind.. 1944; Diplom 
in Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948; M.A., Columbia University 

1958.) 

Margie A. Warren, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; Depart 
ment Head, Out-Patient Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Protestant Deaconess Hospita 
School of Nursing, Evansville, Ind.; B.S., Indiana University, 1949; M.A., Columbi: 
University, 1957.) 



Lucille Wright, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Science. (Diploma in Nursing 
Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.A., University of Colorado, 1950 
M.S., Cornell University, 1955.) 



INSTRUCTORS 

Helen Berg, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nursin 
Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1951.) 

Mary Bielski, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursin 
Service. (B.S. in Nursing. Cornell University, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1958 



Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Ou 
Patient Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Out-Patient Nursing Servio 
(Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924 
B.S., Columbia University, 1945.) 

Marie Caruso, M.A., R.N., Instructor, Medical Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor 
Comprehensive Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornel 
University, 1952; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 



FACULTY 39 

Florknck M. Chapin, M.A., R.\., Instructor in Science and in Fundamentals of Nurs- 
ing. (B.S. in Nursing, University of Rochester, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1957; 

M.S., 1958.) 



Constance Derrell, M.A., R.N., C.N.M., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Out- 
patient Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
|(Diploma in Nursing, Lincoln School of Nursing, New York, 1938; B.S., New York 
rt,, University, 1945; Midwifery Certificate, Tuskegee Institute, Ala., 1946; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1948.) 



1)arlene Erlander, B.A., Instructor in Science. (B.A., St. Olaf College, Northfield, 
[Minnesota, 1952.) 



fEAN French, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Public Health Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing. 
Cornell University, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1955.) 

•Carol C. Frjpp, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.A., Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C, 1944; Diploma in 
Mursing, Meharry Medical College School of Nursing, Nashville, Tenn., 1948.) 

OROTHV Elizabeth Greenleaf, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Super- 
visor^ Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New England Baptist Hospi- 
al School of Nursing, 1942; B.S., Boston University, 1948.) 

VA Hazel, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. (B.P.H.E., University of Toronto, 
1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1948.) 

Louise Hazeltine, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Wursing Service. (B.A., Bucknell University, 1946; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell Uni- 
rersity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; B.S., Cornell University, 1949.) 

^ARY L. Healy, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ng Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Genesee Hospital School of Nursing, Rochester, 
)iew York; B.S., University of Rochester, 1947.) 

AULiNE Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night Super- 
fisor. Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas School of 
Cursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Surgical 
Cursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

LADYS Tyson Jones, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Recovery 
com Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
chool of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Columbia University, 1951.) 

heresa Loszewski, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
ursing Service. (B.S., State Teachers College and Diploma in Nursing, Medical Center 
chool of Nursing, Jersey City, New Jersey, 1949; M.A.. Columbia University. 1952.) 

ARTHA B. MacLeod, M.A., Instructor in Science (Physiology). (B.A., Smith College, 
938; M.A., Syracuse University, 1950.) 

Leave of absence 1958-1959. 



40 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Frances McVey, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing (Long-term Illness and Rehabilita-\ 
tion). (Diploma in Nursing, Mary Immaculate Hospital School of Nursing, New York,i 
1946; B.S., St. John's University, 1954.) 



Dorothy Metzger, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetri 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1947; B.S., Cornell University, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1953.) 



*Marjorie Miller, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing: Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing, Cleve- 
land; B.S., William J. Bryan University, Dayton, Tenn., 1949; M.S., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1954.) 

Edith Margaret Nugent, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (B.S., University of Manitoba, 1944; Diploma in Nursing, Winni- 
peg General Hospital School of Nursing, 1956.) 

Anna M. Ondovchik, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. John's General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Pittsburgh, 194-1; B.S., Duquesne University, 1946; M.A., St. John's 
University, 1957.) 

Irma K. Riley, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Seiuice. (Diploma in Nursing, Montreal General Hospital School of Nursing, 1948; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1955; M.A., 1958.) 

*Wanda Robertson, B.S., R.N.. Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1945; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1945.) 

Mary Rothschild. B.S., R.N.. Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor in Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1954; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1954.) 

Sue Sabia, M.A.. R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Department Head, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School of 
Nursing, Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1950.) 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A.. R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Michael's Hospital School of Nursing, 
Newark, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A., 1954.) 

Virginia Shea, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursmg, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing and B.S. 
in Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, 1948; M.A., Columbia University. 1957.) 

Jeanne Sherman, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing, Assistant Supervisor, Ob- 
stetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Skidmore College, 1947; B.S., Skidmorei 
College, 1947.) 

Dean Smith, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing (Orthopedics); Education 
Director, The Hospital for Special Surgery. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1952; M.A., 1955.) 

* Leave of absence 1958-1959. 



FACULTY 41 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

Marjorie a. Tait, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Assistant Director, 
Psychiatric Nursing. (B.S., Wayne University, Detroit, Mich., 1951.) 

Margaret H. Terry, NLA., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nurs- 
ling; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital School of Nursing, Manchester, N. H., 1935; B.S., 
Boston University, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 



Grace Wallace, M.A,, R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supennsor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., University of California, San Francisco, 1942; M.A., Columbia 
1 [University, 1956.) 

I-Jeanette Walters, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; 
dssistatit Head, Obstetric and (gynecologic Nursing Sen.'ice. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., New York University, 1944; 
M.A., 1949.) 

•Mamie Wang, \LA., R.N., Instructor in Medical Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Peiping Medical College School 
oj, af Nursing, Peiping, China, 1938; B.S., Yenching University, China, 1938; M.A., Colum- 
bia University, 1943.) 



FROM THE FACULTY OF 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OHN E. Deitrick, M.D Dean 

)SKAR DiETHELM, M.D Profcssor of Psychiatry 

<.. Gordon Douglas, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

i^iNCENT DU ViGNEAUD, Ph.D Profcssor of Biochemistvy 

)oN W. Fawcett, \LD Professor of Anatomy 

Frank Glenn, ^LD Professor of Surgery 

OHN G. KiDD, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Jamuel Z. Le\tne, \LD Professor of Pediatrics 

Hugh Luckev, \LD. Professor of Medicine 

Valsh McDermott, ^LD. Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

[ames M. Neill, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

loBERT F. Pitts. ^LD Professor of Physiology 

A^ALTER F. RiKER, NLD Profcssor of Pharmacology 



* Leave of absence 1958-1959. 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 

ASSISTANTS IN INSTRUCTION 

Marjorie H. Agnew, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Xursing: Supo 
visor. Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital Schoc 
of Nursing, 1940; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1952. 

Genrose J. Alfano, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nurs 
ing; Supei-visor , Medical and Surgical Out-Patierit Xursing Service. (Diploma in Nurs 
ing, Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing. New York, New York, 1947; B.S 
Bridgeport University, Bridgeport, Conn., 1953; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 

MiRJAM K. Bergen, M.A.. R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Xursing: Supervisor, Obstetri 
Nursi7ig Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jersev City Medical Center School of Nursing 
1945; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A.,'l957.) 

Carmella Brescia, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S., Syracuse 
University, 1955.) 



Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor, Med 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 



Isabel Cameron, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, ^Vinnepeg General Hospital Schoo 
of Nursing, Winnepeg, Canada, 1929; B.S., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Jane D. Curtis, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursiui 
Service. (B.S., Dickinson College, Carlisle. Pa., 1939; Diploma in Nursing, Cornel 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942.) 

David A. DePeter, M.S., Assistant in Science (Biochemistry). (^.S., St. John's College 
Brooklyn, 1953; M.S., 1956.) 

Alice Marie DonDero. B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pedi 
atric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital School ol 
Nursing, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951.) 

Jeanne Burns Dorie, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nuk 
ing, Cornell University, 1958.) 

Dorothy Douyard, V^.'^., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Providence 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1945.) 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing: Night Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia,. 
Pa., 1935.) 

Eleanor Keep Harle, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Science. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1958.) 

Lois Hartvigsen, B.S.. R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
Cornell University, 1953.) 

42 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 43 

Dorothy Jackson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Gynecologic Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
Gynecologic Xursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue School of Nursing, 194G; 
B.S.. Hunter College, 1953.) 

Ruth E. Kenny, M.A., R.N., Assistant iji Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 
.Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1932; B.S., Columbia University. 1951; M.A., 1956.) 

Pairicia Lawrence, A.B., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (A.B., Bates 
College, Maine, and Diploma in Nursing, New England Baptist Hospital School of 
Nursing. Boston, 1954.) 

l^iRNicE LouGHLiN, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Public Health Nursing, (Nava jo-Cornell 
Field Health Project ^ Arizona). (B.S., Northwestern University, and Diploma in Nurs- 
ing. Evanston Hospital School of Nursing, 1937.) 

•Claire Meyerowitz, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
rvisor. Private Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1945; M.A., 
New York University, 1957.) 

Elizabeth Peeling, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
Cornell University, 1955.) 

\ ircinia Simpson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Xursing Serxnce. (Diploma in Nursing, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1951, 
B.S., Simmons College, 1953.) 

frssiE \Vea\er, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ng Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Buffalo General Hospital School of Nursing, 1924.) 

Mary ^VHITAKER, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Xursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, Waverly, 
Mass., 1933.) 

harlotte L. \Villiams. R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Ob- 
tctric Nursing Seixnce. (Diploma in Nursing. Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 

955.) 



LECTURERS 

acuity of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures 

Cornell University Medical College 



TAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

?^ Ienry N. Prati. NLD Director 



o« LDMIMSTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

fARY Joanna Foster. M.N. . R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

'•'Selen V. Miller, R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

ANDA Summers, R.N Evening Administrative Assistant 



44 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Elizabeth Simmons, M.A., R.N Night Administrative Assista 

Dju Ing, M.S Relief Administrative Assista^ 

Elizabeth McKeown, M.A., R.N Administrative Assistant f 

Professional In-service Educati 

Julia Dennehy, M.A. , R.N • Administrative Assistant f 

Auxiliary Personnel Trainiv 

Martha Weller, B.S., R.N Assistant in Staff Educatio 

Eleanor Young, R.N Assistant in Staff Educatic 

Lois Cantrell, B.Ed., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Servi 

Lefa Rose, R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Servi 

Beatrice McKee, R.N Supervisor, Psychiatric Servi 

Carolyn Wagner, R.N Supervisor^ Out-Patient Departmei 

Inez Mullins, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Servi 

Kathleen M. Young, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Serm 

AIaude D.wiD, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Servi 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N Night Superxnsor, Private Patients Servi 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.N Supervisor, General Operating Root. 

Salome HusTED, R.N Administrative Assistant, General Operating Roon 

Lucy HiCKEY, R.N Supervisor, Private Operating RooYi 

Eloise Cooke, R.N Supervisor ^Gynecologic Operating Root. 

Lydia H. Hansen, R.N Instructor of Auxiliary Sto 

Grace E. Brady, B.S., R.N Assistant Instructor of Auxiliary Sic 

Jeanne Harquail, B.S., R.N Assistant Instructor of Auxiliary Sta 

John A. Payne, R.N Assistant Instructor of Auxiliary Sto 

Olga RoMANELLi, B.S., R.N Evening Assistant Instructor of Auxiliary StCA 



HEAD NURSES 

MEDICINE 



Abraham, Marilyn, B.S. 
Buehler, Meta, B.S. 

SURGERY 

Caron, Theresa 
Cheroniak, TilHe 
Cotterell, Margaret 
Dieterle, Doris 

OPERATING ROOM 

Biggs, Marjorie 
Bosco, Antoinette, B.S. 
Brodzinski. Bernadine 
Burley, Wanda, B.S. 
Burnett, Dorothy 
Collins, Margaret, B.S. 
Derr, Barbara 



Cutright, Rosemary 
Greisen, Claire, B.S. 



Huxster, Marilyn, B.S. 
LaMarche, Lois 
Lubowska, Nina 
Pruchnik, Blanche 



Edmimdson, Ida 
Earmer, Rosemary 
Kehrli, Nancy 
Loef, Marie 
McCready, Esther 
Maclnnis, Mora 
Nielsen. Genevieve 



Ibsen, Doris 
Lagerquist, Elaine, B.S. 



Savage, Shirley 
Scola, Antoinette 
Weeks, Charlotte 



O'Connor, Christine 
Rau, Rozalia, B.A. 
Schultz, Rosemarie 
Sulette, Mary, B.S. 
Vella, Mary 
Westphal, Ereda 



atilfi 

(ffllif 

'm\i 

mk 

imili \ 

lifdfii 

km I 

Sfii I 

km |, 

iiliiifi 

kni 

km 

km 

km I 

Im 

Rm 

■Rm 

■Ro9 

mJli 

jrySti 

irySl ! 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 



45 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Bott, Alma 
Cohvcll, Anna 
Connor, Agnes 
Hammond, Grace 
Jones, Anne 
Know! ton, Jane 



Leonardo, Yolanda 
Mathews, Thelma 
Matus, Veronica 
O'Rourke, Mary, B.S. 
Petroulas, Dorothy 
Schaffner, Jeanne, B.S. 



OUT-PA TIENT DEPA R TMENT 



Aikins, Helen L., M.A. 
Bartlett, Mary 
Brescia, Carmella, B.S. 
Budovic, Geraldine, B.S. 
Carman, Edna 



\ PRIVATE PATIENTS 



Coyle, Patricia 
Gerchak, Helen 
Janora, Helen 

PEDIA TRICS 

Bertagna, Elda 
Frenk, Myra 



Clark, Evelyn 
Evans, Alberta 
Foley, Alice 
Hines, Marilyn 
Ikeda, Itoko 



Kozitsky, Mary 
Moker, Ann 
Morgan, Agnes, B.S. 



Horton, Johanna 
Sukenick, Barbara 



PSYCHIATRY (Payne Whitney Clinic) 



Davis, Carrie 
Hamer, H. Joanne 
Hibbard, Alta 
Janes, Carl 



Lundgren, Grace 
McCabe, Patricia 
Nicholls, Jane 
Smith, Jo Ann 



Trice, Ida 
Warnock, E. Ollie 
Wygant, Mary, B.S. 
Young, Kathleen 



King, Helen E. 
Liddle, Evelyn 
Riker, Anne 
Toter, Roseanne 



Reynolds, Mary 
Smith, Anne 



Traynor, Elizabeth 
Ulatowski, Amelia 



NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Louise Stephexson, M.S., Director 



Katherine Bain, B.S. 
Jeanne Beduhn, B.S. 
Emily Hanson, B.S. 
iEmily Kroog, B.S. 



Marilyn Marvel, B.S. 
Edna Lelle Niver, B.S. 
Susan Paige, B.S. 
Virginia Pearson Snyder, B.S. 



Carol Sullivan, B.S. 
Nancy Vosburgh, B.S. 



OCCUPATIONAL AND RECREATIONAL THERAPY 



IEva Mazur, B.A., O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Main Hospital 

Mildred Spargo, O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Psychiatry 

Grace C. Newberg, B..\ Director, Recreational Therapy, Psychiatry 

jMuHi Yasumura, M.A., O.T.R Director, Occupational Therapy, Pediatrics 



46 SCHOOL OF NURSING 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 



Theodate H. Soule, M.A Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel, A.B Director, The Lying-in Hospital 

Euzabeth F. Hewitt, M.A Chief Social Worker, Payne Whitney Clinic 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Ruth Bergamini, M.P.H Associate Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Service of New York 

Eleanor W. Mole, B.S., R.N Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 

Anne McCabe, M.A., R.N., Director^ Division of Public Health Nursing 

and staff County of Westchester Department of Health 



NURSERY SCHOOLS 

Mrs. Eleanor Blumcart, M.A Director of Nursery School, 

Department of Pediatrics 

Elizabeth Bull, M.A Co-director, New York School for Nursery Years 

Mrs. Dorothy Cleverdon, M.A, . . Educational Director, Summer Play Schools 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL 



CLASS OF 1959 

Name 

Abbot, Joan Byington 
Acker, Barbara Jane 
Adams, Judith Carol 
Adcock, Irene Horner 
Barrett, Veronica Katherine 
Belt, Lila Faye 
Benson, Susan Elinor 
Blanpied, Mary Jane 
Blau, Beverly Sandra 
Bock, Helen Ruth 
Brew, Sandra Lynn 
Bubeck, Naomi Ruth 

Busfield, Margaret Jean 
Chamberlin, Patricia Dodd 
Clark, Evelynn Mackay 
Clark, Margaret Louise 
Cowan, Judith Toby 
Crockett, Elizabeth Ann 
Crouse, Jean Marilyn 
Cullen, Carolyn Claire 
Darby, Patricia Anne 
Davis, Virginia Frances 
Dennick, Mary Fay 
Dole, Mary Fay 
Downing, Beatrice Mary 
Durant, Joan 
Eick, Martha Lloyd 
Farr, Lois Caroline 
Fernandez, Joan Josephine 
Fong, Sylvia Bow Hing 
Foth, Nancy 
Frantz, Millicent 
Fugazzi, Joan Rita 
Gleichenhaus, Jean Susan 
Haegele, Marlene Emily 
Heitmann, Janet Law 
Hengesch, Christine Anne 

Herrmann, Marlene Anne 
Kicking, Stephanie 
Horan, Barbara Reynolds 
Huddleston, Jean Mary 
Huntington, Evelyn Rosalie 
Hutchins, Judith 
Kindred, Ann Drewry 



Address 

Bay Shore, N. Y. 
Allentown, Pa. 
Floral Park, N. Y. 
Catonsville, Md. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Quincy, Mass. 
Syracuse, N. Y, 
Denver, Colo. 
Patchogue, N. Y. 
Woodhaven, N. Y. 
Sturgis, Mich. 
Moanza sur Inzia, 

Belgian Congo 
Deposit, N. Y. 
Croton Falls, N. Y. 
New Hartford, N. Y. 
Newton, N. J. 
Malba, N. Y. 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Wolcott, N. Y. 
Tuckahoe, N. Y. 
Noroton Heights, Conn. 
Hingham, Mass. 
Hamburg, N. Y. 
Hamburg, N.Y. 
Callicoon Center, N. Y. 
Ridgefield, Conn. 
Bedminster, N.J. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Willow Grove, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Cedar Grove, N.J. 
East Aurora, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
New York. N. Y. 
Hazelton, Pa. 
Middletown, N.Y. 
Framingham Centre, 

Mass. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
Decatur, 111. 
Fayetteville, Ark. 
Ho-Ho-Kus, N. y. 
Forest Hills, N.Y, 



College from which 
Transferred 
Cornell University 
Wilson College 
Drew University 
Bucknell University 
St. John's University 
University of Massachusetts 
Cornell University 
Grinnell College 
Cornell University 
Queens College 
Miami University 
Eastern Baptist College 

Cornell University 
Bucknell University 
Cornell University 
Mary Washington College 
Queens College 
Morgan State College 
St. Lawrence University 
Mary Washington College 
St. Elizabeth College 
Bates College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Marywood College 
Colby College 
Russell Sage College 
University of Massachusetts 
Cedar Crest College 
Hunter College 
Cornell University 
Bucknell University 
University of Rochester 
Cornell University 
Pennsylvania State University 
Cornell University 
Rivier College 

Douglass College 
Cedar Crest College 
Bucknell University 
University of Illinois 
Washington University 
Drew University 
Bennett Junior College 



47 



48 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name 

Kislo, Carolyn Rose 



A ddress 
Northampton, Mass. 



Knecht, Suzanne Christine Saddle River, N. J. 
Kuhn, Marjorie Louise Mt. Morris, N. Y. 

Kummer, Barbara WilhelminaCarversville, Pa. 



Leopold, Karla Helene 
Matthes, Anne Carpenter 
Moore, Valerie Anne 
Mover, Dawn Lenore 
McCloskey, Margaret Ann 
Purara, Esther M. 
Rafford, Sylvia Eliren 
Rescorla, Barbara Louise 
Roseme, Carol Jcffers 
Russell, Ruth Springer 
Ryker, Phyllis Mignon 
Savage, Mary Louise 
Schon, Sandra Jean 
Seuling, Jean 
Siu, Mabel K. H. Yang 
Smith, Rella Jacqueline 
Soler, Gencrosa 
Stetson, Mary Anne 
Stickncv, Sandra Jane 
Thics. Xancv Wickcns 
Tonry, Geraldine Patricia 
Walker. Barbara Jean 
Wcaihcrlv. Margaret Payson 
Wcinstcin, June Marcia 
Weiss. June Elizabeth 
Whclan. Barbara Belle 
Zelno. Bcrnadine Alice 
Ziegler, Elizabeth Rebecca 



Evanston, 111. 
Berkeley. Calif. 
Hamden, Conn. 
Jim Thorpe, Pa. 
Laurelton, N. Y. 
Larchmont, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N.V. 
Westfield.N.J. 
Westfield, N.J. 
.\ncon, Canal Zone 
Riverhead, N. Y. 
Mamaroncck. N. Y. 
New Rochelle. N. Y. 
Mineola, N. V. 
Little Neck. N.Y. 
PifTard, N. Y. 
Brooklvn, N. Y. 
Great Neck. N. Y. 
Lewisburg. Pa. 
Groton. Mass. 
New York. N. Y. 
Baldwin. N. Y. 
Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
Brooklyn. N.Y. 
Auburn, N.Y. 
Malverne. N. Y. 
Eynon, Pa. 
Lewisburg. Pa. 



College from which 

Transferred 

American International 

College 
Centenary Junior College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Stanford University 
Finch College 
Temple University 
Marymount College 
Cornell University 
Douglass College 
Cedar Crest College 
Hood College 
Canal Zone Junior College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Concordia Coll. Inst. 
Colbv College 
Cornell University 
New York University 
Colby College 
Bucknell Universitv 
Bates College 
Marvmount College 
University of Maine 
Cornell University 
Drew University 
Houghton College 
Cedar Crest College 
Marvwood College 
Bucknell University 



CLASS OF 1960 



-Allen, Barbara Emily 
Barber. Carol Evans 
Butt. Flora Eli/al)cth 
Cameron. Dorothv Helen 
Cary. Carolvn Louise 
Champoux. Barbara .\nne 
Christman. Barbara Miriam 
Clark. Catherine Cory 
Cormack. Judith .Ann 
Curtis. Elizabeth Barnaby 
Damadian, Claudette Jeanne 
Dickerson. Doris .Ann 
Easter, Margaret Eleanor 



Little Neck, N. Y. 
Shaker Heights. Ohio 
Elkins.W.Va. 
\Vantagh. N. Y. 
New York. N. Y. 
Greenwich, N. Y. 
Peekskill. N. Y. 
New Hartford. N.Y. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
.Morgantown. W. Va. 
Forest Hills. N. Y. 
Snvder. N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



Queens College 
Pembroke Cx)Ilege 
Davis and Elkins College 
St. Lawrence University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Drew University 
Cornell University 
Ohio Universitv 
West Virginia University 
Drew Universitv 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL 



49 



Name 

Eichert, Carol Esther 
Eshleman, Fay Elizabeth 
Fonde, Mary Lou 
Fray, Carol Patricia 
Gideon, Zoe A. 
Giffin, Barbara Jean 
Gittleman, Estelle Fay 
Greenleaf, Janet Kathryn 
Hager, Kathleen Audrey 
Hamilton, Carol Olivia 
Harrold, Barbara Jill 
Heffeman, Mary Susan 
Heyneman, Elizabeth Anne 
Johnson, Betty Rose 
Katzmark, Katherine Ann 
Keller, Mary Louise 
Kenvin, Mona Lee 
Koshatzky, Mary Ann Claire 
Lanning, Maureen D. 
Larson, Judith Anne 
Leitzow, Nancy Adeline 
Levy, Marian Carol 
Lynch, Barbara 
Marr, Anne Theresa 
Mattson, Joanne Lee 
Millett, Therese Frances 
Moorhead, Marilyn Ann 
Moran, Patricia Ann 
Morgan, Martha Jane 
Morrish, Gay Emily 
Moyer, Alice Ann 
Nelson, Rosemary Elizabeth 
Polonko, Julia 
Reinhardt, Janet Louise 
Roberts, Sandra Alice 
Rogers, Susan Geer 
Rubin, Civianne 
Russo, Maria Theresa 
Schmalz, Ann Friedman 
Shiffer, Elizabeth Ann 



Address 

Orwigsburg, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Houtzdale, Pa. 
St. Albans, N. Y. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Deland, Fla. 
Belle Harbor, N. Y. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
Little Neck, N. Y. 
Burnt Hills, N. Y. 
Westwood, N. J. 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Brunswick, Ga. 
Andover, N. J. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Astoria, N. Y. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Lakewood, Ohio 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Kew Gardens Hills, N. Y. 
Glendale, N. Y. 
New York City, N.Y. 
Manhasset, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Pennington, N. J. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rock Hill, S. C. 
New Providence, N. J. 
Harrisburg, Pa, 
Caldwell, N. J. 
Pluckemin, N. J. 
Mattituck, N. Y. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Au Sable Forks, N. Y. 
Milford, Conn. 
Bayside, N. Y. 
Highland, N. Y. 
Meriden, Conn. 



Shuttleworth, Barbara Roberta Wilmington, Del. 



Simonson, Carol Lee 
Smith, Patricia Faith 
Steel, Jean Elizabeth 
Stocking, Patricia Joan 
Stokes, Barbara 
Sullivan, Clarra Mae 
Walsh, Joan Bridget 
Wood, Leona Anne 
Zacharias, Carol Christine 



Hingham, Mass. 
Port Jervis, N.Y. 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Hornell, N. Y. 
Sunnyside, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Hanover, Pa. 



College from which 
Transferred 
Ursinus College 
Hershey Junior College 
Dickinson College 
Hunter College 
Hope College 
Denison University 
Brooklyn College 
Wittenberg College 
Bates College 
Bates College 
Pine Manor College 
St. Elizabeth College 
Scripps College 
Emory University 
Douglass College 
St. Joseph's College 
Queens College 
St. Joseph's College 
Fordham University 
College of Wooster 
Cornell University 
Queens College 
Hood College 
Mount Holyoke College 
Cornell University 
Notre Dame College 
Hood College 
Fordham University 
Agnes Scott College 
Hood College 
Gettysburg College 
Susquehanna University 
Drew University 
Douglass College 
Cornell University 
Wells College 
Mount Holyoke College 
Adelphi College 
Cornell University 
Eastern Baptist College 
Wilson College 
St. Lawrence University 
Hartwick College 
Michigan State University 
Cornell University 
Middlebury College 
Northwestern University 
Marymount College 
Douglass College 
Susquehanna University 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the School as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible background 
preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 



Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information which 
will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing school 
entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 



Date diploma received or expected 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 

19... 

'If you are in college) Please send me an application blank 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the Hospital or to the University with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

'7 give and bequeath to The Society of the New York Hospital 
(or "I give and bequeath to Cornell University") the sum of 

S for the Cornell University-New 

York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift to the School of Nursing shall be 
made in whole or in part for any specific purpose in the pro- 
gram of the School such use may be sf>ecified. 



INDEX 



Absences, 15 

Accreditation of the School, 5 

Activities, 15-17; Nurses Residence, 15- 
16; Alumnae Association, 17; recrea- 
tion, 15; marriage and residence, 17; 
school government, 16; counseling 
services, 17 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
34-46 

Admission, 10; general requirements, 
10; selection of a college, 10; educa- 
tion requirements, 10; age and health, 
12; application, 12; Cornell advisory 
committee on pre-nursing, 35 

Alumnae Association, 17, 35 

Anatomy, 21, 28 

Application for admission, 12, 51 

Assistant Professors, 37-38 

Assistants in Instruction, 42-43 

Associate Professors, 36-37 

Associated with the faculty, 42-46 

Basic nursing program, 18; professional 

curriculum, 18-22 
Biochemistry, 21, 28 
Biological and physical sciences, 28 

Calendar, 3 

Clinics, 8-9 

College, Selection of, 10 

Combined Course in Operating Room, 
Surgical and Out-Patient Nursing, 21, 
30 

Committee for Scholarships, 25, 35 

Community and the Nurse, 21, 28 

Contents, 2 

Cornell University, 5-6; degree, 14; ad- 
visory committee on pre-nursing stu- 
dents. 35; Medical College faculty, 41 

Council of the School. 34 

Counseling services, 17 

Courses, description of, 28-33 

Curriculum, professional, 18-22 

Degree, 14 



Description of courses, 28-33 
Diet Therapy, 21, 22, 31 

Early Child Development, 21, 28 
Educational requirements, 10-12 
Emeritus Professors, 36 
Expenses, 23-25 

Eacilities for instruction, 7-9 
Faculty, 36-41; associated with, 42-46 
Fees and expenses, 23; method of pay- 
ment, 24; maintenance, 24 
Financial aid, 25-27 
Fundamentals of Nursing and allied 
courses, 21, 30 

Graduation, 13-14; degree, 14 
Gynecologic nursing, 21, 32 

Head nurses, 44—45 
Health service, 14-15 
History of School, 5-7 
Historical Backgrounds of Nursing, 21, 
29 

Instructors, 38-41 

Joint Administrative Board, 34 

Lecturers, 43 

Libraries, 7-8 

Loan Fund, 26 

Long Term Illness, 22, 30 

Maintenance, 24 
Marriage, 17 

Maternity Nursing, 21, 32 
Medical Nursing, 21, 31 
Microbiology, 21, 28 

Neurological nursing, 31 

New York Hospital, 5-9; nursing super- 
visors, 43-44; head nurses, 44—45; 
staff, 43-46 

Nurse in Public Health, 22, 29 



53 



54 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Nurses Residence, 15-16 

Nursing, Fundamentals of— and allied 

courses, 21, 30 
Nutrition, 31 

Obstetric (Maternity) Nursing, 21, 32 

Officers of administration, 35 

Operating Room Nursing, 21, 32; Com- 
bined Course, 21, 30 

Orientation, 21, 30 

Orthopedic Nursing, 22, 32 

Out-Patient Department, 9, 19 

Out-Patient Nursing, 21, 29; Combined 
Course, 21, 30 



Recreational facilities. 
Registration, State, 5 
Residence facilities, 15 



5-16 



Scholarships, 25-27 
School government, 16 
Social Sciences, 28-29 
Social Service Departments, 46 
State registration, 5 
Student life and activities, 15-18 
Students now in School, 47-50 
Supervisors, nursing, 43-44 
Surgical Nursing, 21, 32; Combinec 
Course, 21, 30 



Payne Whitney Clinic, 9 

Pediatric Nursing, 22, 33 

Pharmacology, 21, 30 

Physical Education, 21, 33 

Physiology, 21, 28 

Professional Leadership in Nursing 
Care, 22, 31 

Professors, 36, 41 

Program, basic nursing, 18 

Promotion and graduation, 13-14; De- 
gree, 14 

Psychiatric Nursing, 22, 23 

Psycho-social and Cultural Aspects of 
Nursing, 21, 29 

Public health affiliations, 9, 20, 46 

Public Health Nursing, 9, 22, 29 



Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuition, 23 

Uniforms, 23, 24-25 
Urological Nursing, 22, 32 

Vacations, 15 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York, 9 

46 
Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 

9,46 

Westchester County Department ol 
Health, 9, 46 






t 




:rnell university announcements 

UrSING 1959-1960 

IelL university -new YORK HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 



TERM DATES 1959-1960 

Sept. 21, 1959-Dec. 13, 1959 
Dec. 14, 1959-March 6, 1960 
March 7, 1960-May 29, 1960 
May 30, 1960-Sept. 25, 1960 
Sept. 26, 1960-Dec. 18,1960 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
situated in New York City between York Avenue and the East 
River from 68th to 71st Streets, is part of The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center. 

The office of the Assistant in Admissions is on the second floor of 
the Nurses Residence, 1320 York Avenue, at the corner of 70th 
Street. This may be reached by taking the 65th Street crosstown 
bus (M-7) east-bound, to York Avenue and 70th Street. These 
buses connect with all north and south bound transit lines. 

Telephone: TRafalgar 9-9000 (Ext. 7225) 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Published by Cornell University at Edmund Ezra Day Hall, 18 East Avenue, 
Ithaca, New York, every two weeks throughout the calendar year. Volume 51. 
Number 3. July 30, 1959. Second-class mail privileges authorized at the post 
office at Ithaca, New York, December 14, 1916, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

A list of the Announcements will be found on the inside back cover. 



Cornell University -New York Hospital 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1320 YORK AVENUE, NEW YORK 21, N.Y. 
1959-1960 



CONTENTS 



CALENDAR 3 

THE PREPARATION OF TODAY'S PROFESSIONAL NURSE 4 J 

ACCREDITATION 5 

STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 5 1 

HISTORY 5 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 7 

ADMISSION 10? 

] 

PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 13 f 

HEALTH SERVICE 14 

VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 15 

STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 15 

BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 18 

FEES AND EXPENSES 23 i 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 25 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 28 

ADMINISTRATION 34 

FACULTY 36 

ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 42 

STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL 47 

APPLICATION BLANK 51 

INDEX 53 



*h 



CALENDAR 



Sept. 12 Saturday 
Oct. 12 Mo?iday 



1959 

Registration Day 

Holiday: Columbus Day (for all students ex- 
cept Freshmen*) 
Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 
Holiday for Freshmen onh 
Christmas recess begins for Freshmen 
Holiday: Christmas Day 

1960 

Holiday: New Year's Day 
Last day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 
Holiday: Washington's Birthday 
Holiday: Memorial Day 
Commencement Day 
Holiday: Independence Day 
Holiday: Labor Day 
Registration Day 

Holiday: Columbus Day (for all students ex- 
cept Freshmen*) 
Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 
Holiday for Freshmen only 
Christmas recess begins for Freshmen 
Holiday for Christmas Day 

1961 



Last day of Christmas recess for Freshmen 
Holiday for New Year's Day 
(Classes for Freshmen resume ; 
Holiday: Washington's Birthday 
Holiday: Memorial Dav 
Commencement Day 
Holiday: Independence Day 

* Freshmen receive this holiday on the Friday after Thanksgiving. 



Nov. 


26 


Thursday 


Nov. 


27 


Friday 


Dec. 


19 


Saturday 


Dec. 


25 


Friday 


Jan, 


1 


Friday 


Jan. 


3 


Sunday 


Feb. 


22 


Monday 


May 


30 


Monday 


June 


1 


Wednesday 


^ilv 


4 


Monday 


iept. 


5 


Monday 


iept. 


17 


Saturday 


)ct. 


12 


Wednesday 


\ov. 


24 


TJiursday 


NOV. 


25 


Friday 


)ec. 


17 


Saturday 


)ec. 


26 


Monday 


an. 


1 


Sunday 


\n. 


2 


Monday 


eb. 


22 


Wednesday 


[ay 


30 


Tuesday 


uie 


: 7 


Wednesday 


.ilv 


4 


Tuesday 



THE PREPARATION OF TODAY'S 
PROFESSIONAL NURSE 

Nursing represents one of the vital forces for health in today's society. 
The nursing needs of people range from the simplest to the most com- 
plex. Persons with widely varying preparation may help to meet these 
needs, but the professional nurse is the key person in the total picture of 
nursing service. This service includes promotion of health, prevention of 
disease, and treatment of sickness; it should reach individuals in the 
hospital, the home, the school, and on the job. 

The professional nurse who is to function in the pivotal position in 
this total service must have a preparation which is different from that 
offered by the majority of nursing schools. The rapid increase in scien- 
tific knowledge and the broadened scope of therapy alone would make 
this essential. Added to this are the special problems glowing out of the 
wider spectrum of ages to be cared for, since modern medicine provides 
greater health opportunities for the newborn and the aged. The present 
concept of rehabilitation which accepts as an aim optimum recovery for 
each person demands from the nurse factual knowledge based on the 
various sciences, trained insight to recognize possibilities, and skill in 
interpreting this information to her patient. 

Continuing research into the behavioral sciences (e.g., sociology, cul- 
tural anthropology and social psychology) points the way to another 
field in which the nurse must be prepared. These sciences offer resources 
essential in helping her work effectively not only with patients but with 
professional practitioners in related fields, and with less well-prepared 
assistants whom she must guide in nursing care. This responsibility of 
teaching and directing auxiliary personnel is inherent in the work ofi 
every professional nurse today, though unknown only a few years ago. 

The purpose of the program in this School is to prepare a practitioner 
who, immediately upon graduation, can function, with guidance, in any 
beginning position in professional nursing; who is able to help meet one 
of today's greatest health problems, that of finding new and better ways 
of providing nursing care for a rapidly expanding population; who can 
proceed without loss of time or credit should she desire to prepare her- 
self for teaching, administration or research, fields in which there is acute 
need; whose general education is sufficiently broad to make her an ef- 
fective member of her community. 



ACCREDITATION 

The School is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing 
(Accrediting Service) and is one of a small group of schools accredited as 
preparing for beginning public health nurse positions as well as for posi- 
tions in the other fields. This is an important factor in the employment 
status of graduates of the School not only in positions which are specifi- 
cally public health but in others as well, since the accreditation is on the 
basis of the total progiam. 



STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 

Graduates who are citizens or who have legally declared intention of 
becoming citizens are eligible for admission to the examination for licen- 
sure administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are ex- 
pected to take the first examination given after completion of the nursing 
course. Satisfactory completion of this examination classifies the graduate 
of the School as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in the State of New York. If 
citizenship is not completed within seven years from the declaration 
of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

Graduates of the School are urged to take State Board examinations 
in New York State. Those wishing to practice elsewhere may then apply 
for registration either by reciprocity or by examination, depending on 
the laws of the particular state. 



HISTORY 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing was 
established as a School in Cornell University in 1942, on the 65th an- 
niversary of the founding of The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
one of the earliest nursing schools in the country. The School is part of 
The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center which includes also 
the Cornell University Medical College and the various adjoining build- 
ings of The New York Hospital extending from 68th to 71st Streets on 
the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society of the New York 
Hospital and Cornell University, committed to a four-fold purpose in 
(1) care of the sick, providing the same wisdom and skill to rich and 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

poor, (2) education of doctors and nurses, research workers, technicians 
and others who will work in the field of medical science; (3) research to 
extend the boundaries of knowledge in the health fields; (4) promotion 
of public health through the development of preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second oldest voluntary hospital in this 
country, its Royal Charter having been granted in 1771, in the reign of 
King George III. The first patients were soldiers wounded in the Revolu- 
tionary War. At that time the Hospital was located on the lower end of 
Manhattan, the only part of the City then settled, and on early maps the 
location was designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Cornell University with its campus in Ithaca, New York, received its 
charter in 1865, nearly 100 years after the Hospital had been chartered. 

Three circumstances contributed to the founding of the University in 
the eventful years that marked the close of the Civil War. In the first 
place, Ezra Cornell, a citizen of Ithaca, had come into a large fortune 
from his holdings in the newly formed Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany and had devoted a great deal of thought to the good that might be 
done by giving his wealth to education. A second circumstance was the 
fact that the State of New York had received a substantial land grant, 
under the Morrill Act of 1862, for the support of colleges teaching 
agriculture and the mechanical arts. The third circumstance was that 
Mr. Cornell had as a colleague in the state legislature of 1864-1865 a 
young senator named Andrew D. White, later to become the first presi- 
dent of the University, who had the vision of preserving the state's land 
grant intact for a single great institution which should teach not only 
agriculture and the mechanical arts but the humanities and the sciences 
as well. 

The Medical College and the School of Nursing are the two schools 
of the University which are located in New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over 100 years before a school 
for the training of nurses was opened. There had been early steps taken, 
however, to improve the care given to patients and even in 1799, Dr. 
Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician had organized a 
series of lectures combined with a course of practical instruction in the 
wards which was given to the women who were engaged by the Hospital 
at that time as "watchers" and "nurses." Although the theoretical con- 
tent was meager and the practical instruction not systematically planned, 
these classes focused attention on the fact that women who had some 
preparation for their work gave better care than those without instruc- 
tion. When in 1873 the first training school in this country on the 
Nightingale pattern was opened at Bellevue Hospital, the Governors 
of The Society of the New York Hospital contributed to its support. 
Four years later, in 1877, when the Hospital moved to new buildings, 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 7 

The New York Hospital Training School for Nurses was opened in 
quarters which were considered to have all the modern improvements of 
the times. The School moved to the present location when the present 
Medical Center was opened in 1932. 

Early in the Hospital's history it pioneered in such steps as introducing 
temperature charts and anesthetics, in the use of vaccination for small- 
pox, and in humane methods in the care of the mentally ill. Today the 
Center continues to pioneer in the improvement of patient care. In 
today's pioneering, a significant factor is the quality of the nursing which 
must keep abreast Avith developments in the biological, physical and 
social sciences. New methods (such as open heart surgery, and use of the 
artificial kidney) and new approaches (such as family centered maternity 
care and helping the mother of a hospitalized child to play a greater part 
in the child's care) are examples of changes which require new methods 
in nursing as well. 

The health needs of the community and country have been the guid- 
ing force in the development of the School which has strengthened its 
program to keep pace with these needs. Today the work of the profes- 
sional nurse requires a great deal more of her than in the past and in 
recognition of this, the University program was established in 1942. 
Since 1946, all students admitted to the School have been in the degree 
program and the School is now one of the largest collegiate schools of 
nursing in the country. An endowment fund for the School w^as begun 
in 1951 which as it grows will further safeguard the progress of the 
School for future development. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

This Medical Center provides a setting in which there are opportuni- 
ties of great value to students in the health fields. It includes laboratories 
I and libraries with extensive holdings, and offers an environment which 
promotes a spirit of inquiry. It encompasses services to patients reflect- 
ing modern concepts of care and new^r knowledge of health and disease. 
Learning experiences in the Center are augmented by observations and 
practice in other community agencies. 



LIBRARIES 

The library of the School contains a wide selection of materials per- 
tinent to nursing and related fields, and includes important medical 



8 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

and nursing periodicals, both current and in reference sets of bound 
volumes. There are additional small collections in each department near 
the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors. The library is 
under the direction of a committee of the faculty, and in the charge of a 
professional librarian. The facilities of the Medical College Library are 
also readily accessible and make valuable supplementary materials avail- 
able to both the students and faculty of the Nursing School. In addition, 
the broad resources of the New York Public Library, the National Health 
Library, and many other special libraries in the city may be called upon 
whenever needed. 



CLINICAL SERVICES 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital and the Hospital 
for Special Surgery (Orthopedic) provide unusual opportunity for the 
care and study of patients. The New York Hospital is comprised of five 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided 
not only with facilities adequate in every way for the care of both in- 
patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching and for 
the conduct of research. Many specialized clinical services are therefore 
available which are seldom found within a single organization. The 
Hospital has 1,206 beds and 86 clinics. Annually approximately 30,000 
patients are hospitalized and 45,000 treated as out-patients. The conduct 
of research in all clinical departments gives the student nurse an oppor- 
tunity to become increasingly aware of the part which the nurse must 
be prepared to play in research projects. Authenticity of the findings in 
many studies depends to no small degree on the accuracy with which the 
nurse carries out tests and procedures, observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to general 
medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of 
tuberculosis, neurology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and throat 
disorders, plastic and neuro-surgery, ophthalmology, and a fracture 
service. The Lying-in Hospital has a capacity of 206 adults and 102 new- 
borns and provides for obstetric and g)'necologic patients. Each year 
more than 4,000 babies are born in this Hospital. Since this Center was 
founded in 1932 over 100,000 babies have been born here. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 96 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. Facili- 
ties for the recreation of convalescent children and the services of an 
occupational therapist offer opportunities for the nursing student to 
study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick chil- 
dren. All students have Nursery School experience. Here the student 









FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 9 

works with and observes the development of the well child, and is thus 
better able to evaluate deviations in behavior which may accompany 
illness. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity of 
108 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational and 
recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of psychiatric 
patients. The close association between the psychiatric, medical and 
nursing staffs and the staffs of the other clinical departments, on a con- 
sultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the relationship 
between mental and physical illness throughout her experience in the 
Hospital. 

The Out-Patient Department with its 86 clinics provides opportunity 
for the study of a large number of patients who come for general health 
supervision, diagnosis of disease and for treatment of disease that can 
be conducted on an ambulatory basis. Each year more than 250,000 pa- 
tient visits are made to this Department. Students assist in diagnostic 
tests, in treatments and in teaching patients self-care. Arrangements 
for continuity of care through use of referrals to public health nursing 
agencies are an essential part of all experiences. Opportunity is pro- 
vided for participation in the teaching of expectant parents through 
special classes and individual conferences and for study of the family 
approach to health maintenance and care of children. 

The Hospital for Special Surgery provides care and carries out research 
and teaching related to the needs of patients with orthopedic and rheu- 
matic diseases. It has a capacity of 170 beds and 55,000 visits are made 
annually by patients who are being treated in the many special clinics 
of the Out-Patient Department. Nursing students have an opportunity 
to participate in the care of patients of all ages who are affected by a wide 
range of problems. 

Public Health nursing field experience is provided in The Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York, The \'isiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 
and, through the New York State Department of Health, with West- 
chester County Department of Health. These agencies provide oppor- 
tunitv for the student to learn the application of public health principles 
in both voluntary and official agencies. 

Representatives of various governmental, voluntary and coordinating 
agencies plan with the faculty for appropriate ways to contribute to the 
student's knowledge of the communitv and of community organization 
for human services. 



ADMISSION 

GENERAL STATEMENT OF REQUIREMENTS 

Nursing requires individuals of integiity and intelligence with a deep 
interest in public service. Candidates are selected whose credentials 
indicate high rank in health, scholarship, maturity, ability to work with 
people, and who give evidence of personal fitness for nursing. A mini- 
mum of two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive of Physical 
Education) is required for admission. 

SELECTION OF A COLLEGE FOR THE FIRST TWO YEARS 

To meet the requirement of two years of college for admission, a very 
wide choice of colleges is available. The content of these two years is 
general liberal arts and may be taken in any university, college, or junior 
college accredited by one of the regional associations of colleges and 
secondary schools. Applicants may therefore take the first two years at 
any one of a great many colleges throughout the country or in one of 
the colleges of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The work of the 
first two years required for admission to this School contains no nursing 
or "pre-nursing" courses and, therefore, selection of a college in which 
to take the first two years is NOT dependent upon its offering a pre- 
nursing program. 

Help in the selection of a college may be obtained by referring to the 
list of "Students in the School" which appears at the back of our School 
of Nursing bulletin as this list indicates the colleges from which students 
now in the School of Nursing have transferred. The list is, however, not 
a complete list of the colleges from which students may transfer. 

In selecting a college and registering for the courses of your first two 
years, read carefully the following section on "Educational Requirements 
for Admission." 

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



Within the two-year liberal arts program of the first two college years 
required for admission, only 15 credits are in specified subjects as| 
follows: j;arj 

Required: Semester Hrs. Credit , 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 toll 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 i[^ 

Psychology 3 

10 



ADMISSION 

Recommended: 



Students are urged to obtain a course in sociology or social anthro- 
pology. Other subjects which are especially helpful but in which there 
is no specified requirement are: 

English, Literature, Human Relations, History, 
Desirable: 



Subjects next in importance depending upon the special interest and 
abilities of the student and the courses available are: 

Languages (may be of particular usefulness with patients and also 
for the many opportunities in international work and in ad- 
vanced study) 

Economics, Physics 

Art, Music 

Additional courses in physical or biological sciences (for students 
taking more than 60 credits) 

However not more than 12 hours of biological science can be 
accepted toward meeting the 60 credit hours required for 
admission. 

The program in the School of Nursing requires the student to have 

I "a good background in English composition, communications skills, and 
use of the library. Should a student prove markedly deficient in com- 
munication skills she may be required to strengthen her background by 
taking courses at a nearby university. Courses which are 7iot accepted 
as fulfilling the 6-hour credit requirements in biological sciences are 
[luman anatomy, physiology, and bacteriology, as these courses are 
■Deluded in the professional program after admission to the School of 
Nursing. Generally the principle applies that courses like those given in 
;he School of Nursing cannot be credited toward meeting admissions 
equirements because there is no allowance within the School of Nurs- 
ng program for electives which can be substituted for courses already 
aken. 

Students on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca should confer 
arly with their advisors in the college in which they are registered or 
ith the Office of the Dean of Women. Advisors will be glad to assist in 
lanning a desirable program. These students as well as students in other 
olleges and universities should, however, communicate with the School 
f Nursing as indicated under "Application for Admission." Each time 
u register for your courses during your first two years, it is suggested 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

that you take this bulletin with you and review this section with your 
advisor. Applicants who do not meet in full the specific subject require- 
ments for admission, but who have a good record of two or more years 
of college are encouraged to communicate with the School of Nursing 
for review of their credits and possible assistance in arranging for courses 
which can be taken in summer sessions. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifications, 
there are not definite age limits. In general, however, it has proven de- 
sirable for applicants to be between the ages of 18 and 35 years. The 
results of a complete physical examination as well as those of a dental 
examination must be submitted at the time of application. Vaccination 
against poliomyelitis before admission is strongly urged. Inoculation 
against typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox are required of 
all students. In addition the applicant must have a Schick Test and if 
the reaction is positive must be immunized against diphtheria before 
admission. 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 



A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nursing, 
containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the form at 
the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. Ap- 
plicants for admission should include with their application the appli- 
cation fee. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain psycho- 
metric tests are required before admission. The applicant is asked to ^ 
meet the charge of $10.00 for these tests. 

A personal interview is considered an important part of the applica- 
tion procedure. Effort is made to have the applicant meet with a member 
of the Committee on Admissions at the School in New York. If this is 
not practicable, a conference can often be arranged with an alumna or 
other qualified person living near the applicant's home or college. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants contact the School as early 
as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their progi'ams' 
in high school and college to gain the best possible educational back-L 
gi^ound preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. f^n 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal application 
should be made during the first term of the first college year if the appl 



k 



]or. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 13 

cant plans to enter this school after her second college year. When all 
application forms are received, including the report of the psychometric 
test and a transcript covering the first year of college work, and these 
appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted arid a place in 
the class held for her pending completion of the remaining requirements. 
A candidate for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon notifi- 
cation of this acceptance to the School. The full amount is credited 
toward the giaduation fee. The deposit is not refundable if the applicant 
does not register. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

I Each term is 12 weeks in length and the established system of grading is 
a scale of F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. An average of C 
i for each term is required for promotion without condition. A grade of C 
is required in the course Fundamentals of Nursing. A grade below C in 
any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average which is less than 
C places a student on condition. This must be removed by the end of the 
next term to insure further promotion. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the judg- 
ment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she can 
complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable period of time. 

An F (Failure) in any subject may necessitate withdrawal from the 
School unless the student's ability is exceptional in other respects, in 
which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the instruc- 
tor, if the course is available. With faculty approval a similar course may 
be taken at another university in the city, if not available at this School. 
No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and onlv 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
[n case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the stu- 
dent to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory to it. 
A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by a Pro- 
motion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice, rela- 
lionships with patients and co-workers, and general development are 
'actors. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her work 
)r who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the qualifica- 
ions which are important for a good nurse may be put on condition, 
iuspended, or asked to withdraw. The School reserves the privilege of 



14 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

retaining only tJiose students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy 
the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal suitability for 
nursing. 

Parents or guardians of students are advised when students are placed 
on condition or asked to leave the School. However, in general, the 
School reports only to students. Each student is kept informed of her 
progress through frequent examinations, reports and conferences, and 
every effort is made to provide assistance and guidance which will help 
her to succeed. When it seems advisable a student may be asked to with- 
draw from the program without having first been on condition. 



DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University. In order to qualify for the degree, the student must maintain 
a cumulative average of C for the total program, and must have com- 
pleted satisfactorily all of the theory and practice outlined in this 
Announcement or required by decision of the faculty. 

In keeping with practice throughout the University, students in the 
School of Nursing may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing With Distinction, the only honorary designation granted by 
Cornell University. To qualify for this honor the student, in the judg- 
ment of the faculty, must have maintained her work at an exceptionally 
high level and must possess personal characteristics consistent with effec- 
tive professional practice. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Good health is of the utmost importance and students have readily 
available a well-organized health service maintained in cooperation 
with the health service of the Center. Provision is also made for hospital 
care. 

Upon admission a physical examination by the school physician, a 
tuberculin test, and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently, a chest 
X-ray is required twice a year, and a physical examination annually. 
Students receive dental health service consisting of a series of full-mouth 
X-rays, examination by a dentist, a written diagnosis with suggestions |oq 
for treatment, and follow-up supervision. For dental repair, students 
are referred to their own dentists. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 15 

In the event of short-term illness requiring bed care, students are ad- 
mitted to a special floor of The New York Hospital which is maintained 
for this purpose. If more seriously ill, students are cared for on other 
floors of the Hospital within the limits of the Hospital's policy on ad- 
missions and bed usage, and hospitalization up to the amount of eight 
weeks for any one admission is provided. Elective surgery and dental 
work are not included and if not taken care of before admission to the 
School must be arranged during vacations. Expenses for private nurses, 
transfusions and personal items are borne by the student. The School re- 
serves the right to collect all benefits from hospitalization insurance 
carried by the student as partial payment for care. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a student's 
health makes it unwise for her to remain in the School, she may be re- 
quired to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any time. 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 

There is a vacation of five weeks in the first year, two weeks of this 
being given at Christmas time. In the second year there is a four-week 
vacation. All vacations are arranged to conform to the requirements of 
the program but usually fall within the Summer months. 

Because of the nature of assignments, a leave of absence usually neces- 
sitates absence for an entire term. As a result of absence, a student may be 
irequired to re-register for a course of study or a nursing practice period, 
or she may be transferred to a later class. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence adjacent to the Hospital. Every 
ffort has been made in the construction and equipment of the Residence 
o provide for the normal and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are located 
>n the first and ground floors. Students have attractively furnished single 
ooms with running water. Each floor has ample baths, showers, and 
oilet facilities, a laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoining 
itchenette for informal gatherings. 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, provisions for this development in the life 
of the student have been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch 
of the Public Library is located within a few blocks of the Hospital. 

A large auditorium is located on the first floor of the Residence. Sun 
roofs, pianos, television sets, and record players are also available. Stu- 
dent activities planned jointly with the Cornell University Medical 
College are a regular part of the recreation and may include glee club 
and dramatic productions. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association, plans are made 
for joining other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach equip- 
ment and an outdoor grill are available. To insure the full benefit of 
proper use of these facilities, a Residence Director and a well-qualified 
instructor in Physical Education are in charge. Guest rooms are often 
available for friends and relatives at a reasonable charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless in 
music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Students enjoy the benefits of 
such opportunities as membership in the Metropolitan Opera Guild. 
Theatre tickets are often available through the Residence facilities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," several 
times a year. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The Blue 
Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships for both 
medical and nursing students, the Nurses' Christian Fellowship and the 
Newman Club. Guest speakers and planned forums provide an opportu- 
nity for exchange of thought on many subjects. 



SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School, unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." Through the Student Organi- 
zation, students take responsibility for living according to this rule which 
is construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all students. The 
Student Organization sets up its own Executive Council, Judicial Coun- 
cil and standing committees. A Faculty Committee on Student Affairs 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 17 



acts in an advisory capacity to the Student Organization and, with the 
Student Organization, sponsors student-faculty meetings which provide 
for informal discussions of school activities and problems. 



MARRIAGE AND RESIDENCE 

Because interruptions in attendance or inability to complete one or 
more courses at the time scheduled present a considerably greater prob- 
lem in a program of this kind than in the usual academic course of study, 
freedom from outside obligations of a demanding nature is important. 
For this reason it is the responsibility of a student who is contemplating 
marriage during her period in the School to discuss her proposed plans 
well in advance with the Dean and to obtain permission to remain in 
the School after marriage. 

Under certain conditions, including approval of location, permission 
to live outside the Residence may be gianted to a married student, if, in 
the judgment of the faculty, it will not interfere with her School re- 
sponsibilities. The faculty record their belief that responsibility for 
maintaining the quality of her work and for continuing participation 
in School activities must be accepted by the student. A married appli- 
cant, if accepted, may be asked to live in the Residence for at least the 
first six months. 

Students anticipating marriage are expected to make plans which will 
fit into their regular vacation or school schedule as leave of absence can 
rarely be granted except for an entire term. 



COUNSELING SERVICES 



The School maintains active counseling services which are a\ailable 
to any student who needs assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in her normal work in the School or in con- 
nection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students assists students in every way possible in 
their educational and personal-social adjustment. She also cooperates 
with the faculty in helping the students in these areas and directs them 
to those members of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for anv 
student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase of her 
life while in the School of Nursing. 



18 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the ten 
alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national profes- 
sional organization of nurses, now known as the American Nurses' Asso- 
ciation. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part of the Cornell 
University Alumni Association. 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL (2 years). See pages 10-12. 

Required courses: Semester Hrs. Credit 

Chemistry— (including laboratory) 6 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 

Psychology 3 

Suggested courses: 

History, Sociology, Economics, other Liberal Arts subjects . 45 
Total (Pre-Professional) 60 

^PROFESSIONAL (32 months). In the School of Nursing 

General Education Courses 15.5 

Professional Nursing Major 80.5 

Total 96 

Grand Total (required for B.S. in Nursing) 156 



OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAM 

In keeping with the philosophy underlying the program, the admis- 
sion requirements and the curriculum have been planned to help each 
student attain the following objectives: 

To grow toward becoming a mature individual as evidenced by self 
motivation, self-direction, willingness to assume responsibility for her 
own actions, and the development of a set of values worthy of a profes- 
sional person and a good citizen. 

To develop as a person who is sensitive to the needs of others and who 

* See footnote on page 22. 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 19 

can establish effective relationships and gain satisfaction and happiness 
from her daily activities. 

To develop a concept of nursing as encompassing not only the care of 
the sick but the prevention of illness and the promotion of health for the 
individual and the community. 

To become professionally competent and technically skilled; capable 
of drawing upon the humanities and the natural and social sciences to 
make reasoned judgments in the practice of her profession. 

To gain appreciation of the place of nursing in today's society and 
ability to interpret it to others; to see her personal responsibilities as a 
member of the nursing profession. 



THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum covers a period of 32 months.* In each 
term related classes, conferences, and clinical practice are concurrent and 
emphasis is placed on disease prevention, health instruction and reha- 
bilitation. Throughout the program there is emphasis on community 
nursing, and the student has early contact with various agencies assisting 
with health problems. She participates in discussions centering around 
family health and assists in the referral of patients requiring nursing 
care after hospital discharge. 

The first two terms are devoted primarily to class and laboratory 
assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the pavilions 
of the Hospital. During the next four terms the student is assigned to 
selected clinical areas for theory and related practice. These include the 
Out-Patient Department, the Operating and Recovery Rooms, Medi- 
cine, Surgery and Obstetrics. 

In the Out-Patient Department the student has an opportunity to 
learn something of the medical and nursing needs of patients who are, 
for the most part, carrying on their usual life activities, while being 
treated for some health problem, or learning to live with some physical 
limitation. She is assigned to the clinics of medicine, surgery and pedi- 
atrics. During her in-patient experience on the medical and surgical 
services, she has experience not only on the "general" services but in 
such specialties as ophthalmolog)', neurology, neuro-surgery and oto- 
laryngology'. 

It is not anticipated that the student will develop a high degi^ee of 
technical skill in the Operating Room. However, through supervised 
practice and observations at the field of operation, by participating in 
the care of patients in the Recovery Room, and by following selected 

* See footnote on page 22. 



20 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

patients through their total operative experience, the ground work is 
laid for understanding of patients' nursing needs, not only during oper- 
ation, but immediately preceding and following it. 

In the Woman's Clinic, assignments for practice include activities 
related to the newer concepts of maternal and newborn care, embodied 
in such terms as "preparation for parenthood" and "rooming-in." The 
student has experience in the Out-Patient Department, delivery floor, 
and rooming-in units. 

When the student reaches the mid-point of her program she begins 
another four-term unit of theory and related practice. A six- or eight- 
week affiliation with a public health nursing agency provides an oppor- 
tunity for the student to learn of other health agencies in the communi- 
ty, to care for patients in their homes and to teach members of the family 
to give necessary care between visits of the nurse. 

During another period of eight weeks the student considers the special 
nursing problems related to long-term illness. She visits various agencies 
and facilities in the community which offer services to the aged and to 
those with special handicaps such as cerebral palsy. A 12-week assign- 
ment in the Pediatric Clinic and Division of Child Development in- 
cludes experience in Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant 
floor and the unit for older children. A similar 12-week period is spent 
in the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic where the student has an op- 
portunity to gain a keen appreciation of the causes of mental and emo- 
tional illness, of the ways in which such illness may be prevented, and 
knowledge of the newer methods of therapy for its relief. Experience is 
also provided in Diet Therapy and in Urological and Gynecologic 
Nursing, and in leadership of the nursing "team." 

In the last term the student is ready to accept almost complete re- 
sponsibility for analyzing and meeting the nursing needs of selected 
patients. She returns to one of the services on which she had experience 
earlier in her program, and with a minimum of guidance plans and 
carries out the care of patients who present complex nursing problems. , 
She has charge responsibility on a pavilion for limited periods of the || 
day, as well as during the evening or night. 

Within the clinical department where she has this special experience, 
the student, if she desires, may choose a nursing problem to explore in i 
detail. This would include extensive library investigation and may take 
her into any part of the Medical Center or into other community agen- 
cies. Related classes and seminars provide an opportunity for explora- 
tion of principles, exchange of ideas, and sharing of experiences. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum in 
keeping w^ith the nursing needs of society and the best interests of the j- 
students and School. 



I To 



i 



THE BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 



21 



PROGRAM 



First Year (Fall Quarter) 



First Year (Winter Quarter) 



Course 
No. 



Course Title 



120 Orientation 

100 Anatomy — Histology 

101-102 Biochemistry — Physiology 

122 Pharmacology 

105 Early Child Development 



106 
121 



175 



The Community and the Nurse 
Fundamentals of Nursing 

Physical Education 



Total 



Sem. 
Mrs. 
Cr. 



1.5 
3.5 
0.5 
1.0 

1.0 
4.0 



Course 
No. 



Course Title 



(Continued) 

(Continued) 

(Continued) 

107 Psycho-social and Cultural 

Aspects of Nursing I 

(Continued) 

(Continued) 

130 Nutrition 

(Continued) 



11.5 Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
Cr. 

1.5 
2.0 
1.0 

1.0 
0.5 
3.5 
0.5 




10.0 



First Year (Spring Quarter)* 



First Year (Summer Quarter)' 







Sem. 








Sem. 


Course 


Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title Prac. 


Cr. 


No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 


150 


Maternity — Gynecologic 
Nursing 12 


8.0 


140 


Medical Nursing 


12 


7.5 


131 


Diet Therapy and Food 
Preparation 


1.0 










103 


Microbiology 


2.0 




(Vacation) 






121 


Fundamentals of Nursing 


1.0 










175 


Phvsical Education 













Total 


12 


12.0 


Total 




12 


7.5 



Second Year (Fall Quarter)'* 



Second Year (Winter Quarter)' 









Sem. 




Sem. 


Course 


Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title P 


rac. 


Cr. 


No. Course Title Prac. 


Cr. 


145 


Surgical Nursing 


12 


6.0 


118 Nursing in the Out- 




144 


The Surgical Treatment 






Patient Department 6 


4.0 




of Diseases 




2.0 


148 Operating Room Nursing 6 


3.5 


109 


Historical Background of 












Nursing 




1.0 


(Continued) 


1.0 


108 


Psvcho-social and Cultural 












Aspects of Nursing II 




1.0 


124 Emergency Nursing 


1.0 


Total 




12 


10.0 


Total 12 


9.5 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

PROGRAM (continued) 



Second Year (Spring Quarter)' 



Second Year (Summer Quarter)* 









Sem. 








Sem. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 


No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 


160 


Pediatric Nursing 


12 


8.0 


170 


Psychiatric Nursing 
(Vacation) 


12 


8.0 


Total 




12 


8.0 


Total 




12 


8.0 



Third Year (Fall Quarter)** 



Third Year (Winter Quarter)*^ 









Sem. 




Sem. 


Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 


Course 


Weeks Hrs. 


No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 


No. 


Course Title Prac. Cr. 


123 


Nursing in Long-Term 












Illness 


8 


4.0 


115 


Principles of Public 


132 


Diet Therapy Practice 
and Related Confer- 








Health and Public 

Health Nursing 2.0 




ences 


4 


1.5 


116 

146 


Practice of Public Health 

Nursing and Related 

Conferences 6 or 8 3.5 
Orthopedic Nursing 4 2.0 


Total 




12 


5.5 


Total 


10 or 12 7.5 



Third Year (Spring Quarter) 



Summary 









Sem. 




Course 




Weeks 


Hrs. 




No. 


Course Title 


Prac. 


Cr. 




147 


Urologic and Gyneco- 
logic Nursing (and 






Grand Total 

Credit: 96 Hours 




Team Leadership) 


6 


3.0 


Clinical Practice: 108 Weeks 


125 


Professional Leadership 










in Nursing Care 


6 or 8 


3.5 


* or * * A student may have clinical courses in 
any order within quarters which are starred 
alike. 


Total 




12 or 14 


6.5 



t A student holding a baccalaureate degree at the time of admission may elect a 
special program which is three months shorter than the regular program, omitting the 
Spring Quarter of the Third Year. To be eligible, the student must maintain her 
work at a satisfactory level and submit a written request to the Associate Dean not 
later than December 15 of the Junior Year. 



■ I" - y I J 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

(Subject to variation or change) 

On Approx. Approx. Approx. 

Admission March 15 March 15 March 15 Total 
TUITION AND FEES (6 months) (12mos.) (12mos.) (3 months) 

(Application Fee $10.00) 

Matriculation $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition 140.00 |140.00 $130.00 $ 40.00 450.00 

Public Health Field Ex- 
pense . . . 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 2.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 9.00 

Health and Dental 

Service 10.00 16.00_ 16.00 3.00 45.00 

Hospitalization Insur- /SJ ' '^ ^ ^ ^^ ■ / - 

ance 5:^8 TTTe 11.76 ^:94 32.34 

Nursery School 5.00 5.00 

Graduation 25.00* 25.00 

1197.88 $170.76 $225.76 $ 71.94 $666.34 

! UNIFORMS, etc. '^j^ % 3 ^^^J^- 

Uniforms & Accessories . $ 93.50 / 7^,^ ^ ^^ C ^^'' $ 93.50 

Sweater 5.75 ' " ^^" a ^'^^ 

Shoes 14.37 $ 14.37 -v T "^ 28.74 

Scissors & Name Pin ... , 3.37 3.37 

Laboratory Coats 9.00 9.00 

iRental Public Health 

Uniforms 7.50 7.50 

IGraduate Uniform 

&Cap 11.05 11.05 

Lental Cap & Gown .... 2.50 2.50 

$125.99 $ 14.37 $ 18.55 $ 2.50 $161.41 

>i| I * The deposit of $25 paid at time of acceptance is credited as graduation fee and is 
educted from final payment, not refundable if student withdraws before admission or 
oes not complete program. 



\M Other miscellaneous expenses include books, field trips, gym suit, and 
leiB Student Organization fee, which for the full program total approxi- 
""'Jmately $135.00. See also "Maintenance" and "Uniforms." Special fees are 
charged for the following: For change of schedule, for re-admission or 
reinstatement following leave of absence— $10; special arrangement for 



24 SCHOOL OF NURSING 



examination— $2; specially scheduled clinical conferences— fee as for 
tutoring; late payment of fees— $5. For reasons judged adequate in ex- 
ceptional circumstances a special fee may be waived by the Dean. 



METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon acceptance for admission, a deposit of $25.00 is required. This 
is credited as the graduation fee but is not refundable if the student 
withdraws her application or does not finish. On registration day, pay- 
ment is due for tuition and fees for the first six months, for the uniforms 
and certain other expenses. A statement of fees payable on that day will 
be sent to each accepted applicant shortly before registration day. 

The second payment of fees and tuition is due on approximately 
March 15 following admission and covers a 12-month period; the third 
payment is due the following March 15 for a 12-month period; the last 
payment is due on approximately March 15 prior to the June graduation 
for the last 3-month period. Students are billed in advance. Fees become 
due on the first day of the March term and must be paid not later than 
20 days after the first day of the term. 

Books, gym suit, and articles listed on page 23 under "Uniforms" 
are purchased through the School and obtained after admission in ac- 
cord with instructions given to each student on or after admission. A list 
of necessary personal equipment will be sent to each accepted applicant 
shortly before registration day. 

Students holding hospitalization insurance at the time of admission 
are required to take out insurance through the School as required for all 
students. Students pay one half of the cost and the other half is paid by 
the Hospital. Refunds for policies held on admission may be claimed 
at the office of former policy. 

The School reserves the right to change its tuition and fees in amount, 
time, and manner of payment as necessary. 



MAINTENANCE 

With the exceptions indicated in this paragraph, each student receives 
maintenance consisting of room, an allowance for meals, and laundering 
of uniforms. During the first 23 weeks in the School and during the eight 
weeks she is having experience with the Visiting Nurse Service, the stu- 
dent meets the cost of her meals which are paid for as purchased, at 
approximately $14.00 a week. There are four cafeterias in the Center 
where meals may be purchased. During vacations maintenance is not 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 25 



provided. The student may leave her possessions in her room during her 
vacation but may not use the room except by permission of the Dean and 
the Residence Director, in which case there is a small daily charge. 



UNIFORMS 

The blue plaid chambray uniform of the School, with apron, bib, and 
cap, is worn by the student for all clinical assignments. The tan labora- 
tory coat is worn over street clothes if students return to any floor of the 
Hospital for study outside of their regular assignment. For the public 
health nursing assignment, each student is required to provide herself 
with a tailored navy or black coat, hat or beret appropriate to the season, 
and black or navy low-heeled walking shoes, preferably oxfords, and 
tailored conservative rainwear. Other items of uniform for hospital and 
public health assignments are listed under "Expenses." 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 

Several scholarships administered by the School are available, usually 
in amounts of $100 to $700, to students in need of financial assistance. 
These awards are open to both students entering the School of Nursing 
and those already in the School unless otherwise indicated. Factors taken 
into consideration, in addition to financial need, are the students' all- 
round record as indicated by academic work, participation in school 
and community activities, and qualities indicating promise of growth 
and potential contribution to nursing. 

Students taking their first two years of academic work at Cornell in 
Ithaca may obtain additional information on scholarships by writing to 
Scholarship Secretary, Office of Admissions, Cornell University, Ithaca, 
N.Y. 

With the exception of the New York State Regents Scholarships, ap- 
plications from entering students are made to the Dean, at the time of 
application for admission to the School. For students already in the 
School, application is made not later than February 15 for grants to be 
used in the period March 15 to March 15. 

FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS-Established 
and maintained by a committee of women interested in the School of 
Nursing to assist girls who otherwise would not be able to prepare for 
nursing. Several scholarships each year. 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

JULIETTTE E. BLOHME SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an 
endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial 
to Juliette E. Blohme of the Class of 1922 through a gift of $6,000, the 
interest on which may be used in whole or in part each year. 

VIVIAN B. ALLEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND-Established as an en- 
dowed fund by a gift of 1 14,000 from the Vivian B. Allen Foundation, 
Inc., income from which is used to provide scholarship aid annually for 
one or more students in need of financial assistance. 

NORTH COUNTRY COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION SCHOLAR- 
SHIP— Given by the North Country Community Association, Glen 
Head, New York, for an entering student residing in Nassau, Suffolk or 
Queens County, New York, who indicates a potential interest in the field 
of public health nursing as a possible field of interest at some time in the 
future. Amount, $600. 

EMMAJEAN STEEL FULLER FUND-This Fund, begun in 1952 by 
the Class of 1952 in memory of Emmajean Steel Fuller, a former member 
of the Class, is available for an occasional scholarship. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND-Loans are available to students who have 
been in the School at least one term. Applications are made to the Dean. 
Although applications are accepted at any time during the year, students 
are encouraged to plan, as far as possible, for a year at a time and make 
application by February 15 for grants to be used in the period March 15 
to March 15. 



NEW YORK STATE REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarships are available for residents of New York 
State. The applicant should apply through her high school principal 
while still a student in high school. All are awarded on the basis of com- 
petitive examinations. 

For more information on any of these, write to the State Education 
Department, University of the State of New York, Albany, New York, 
requesting the leaflet "Opening the Door to College Study through New 
York State Regents Scholarship Examinations for High School Seniors." 

REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS FOR BASIC PROFESSIONAL EDUCA- 
TION IN NURSING-Amount, |20O-|500 a year depending upon fi- 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 27 

nancial need for a maximum of three years. Applicable to period in the 
School of Nursing but not to first two years of college. 

REGENTS COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS-Amount, $250-$700 a year 
depending upon financial need for a maximum of four years. Applicable 
to period in the School of Nursing and to first two years of college. 

REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS IN CORNELL-A tuition-reducing 
scholarship ranging in amount from $100 to $1,000 a year depending 
upon financial need for a maximum of five years. Applicable to period 
in the School of Nursing and to first two years of college. 

REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS FOR CHILDREN OF DISEASED AND 
DISABLED VETERANS-Amount, $450 a year for four years. Appli- 
cable to period in the School of Nursing and to first two years of college. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

(See Requirements for Promotion and Graduation, pages 13-14) 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY- HISTOLOGY. Designed to acquaint the student with the gross and 
microscopic structure of the human body. Laboratory includes cadaver demonstration 
and microscopic examination of prepared slides. 

Miss CHAPj N. Mrs. HARLE, and assistants 
Credit: 3 Hours (70 hours class and laboratory). 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. Consists of a study of the physiological systems and their integra- 
tion into the total functions of the human body. Closely related to the course in 
Biochemistry. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and laboratory. 

Miss I^YNBERp EN. Mrs. MacLEOD, Miss GIST, and others. 
Credit: 2 Hours (45 hours class and laboratory). 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY. Designed to acquaint students with some of the fundamental 
principles of physiological chemistry, as these apply to nursing practice. Studies of 
water and electrolyte balance, the chemistry, digestion and metabolism of food, and the 
composition of blood and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, 
and laboratory. 

Miss RYNBERGEN, Mr. De PETER, Miss GIST, and others. 
Credit: 3.5 Hours (60 hours class and laboratory). 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms. Bacteriology 
and immunology as applied to the agents of infectious diseases. 

Miss CHAPIN, Mrs. HARLE, and others. 
Credit: 2 Hours (45 hours class and laboratory). 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

105. EARLY CHILD DEVELOPMENT. Emphasis is placed upon the growth pat- 
terns of early childhood and upon the emotional and social forces which affect the 
child from birth to six years. 

Faculty from the Departments of Pediatric, Obstetric, Out-Patient Nursing, and the 
Mental Hygiene Consultant. 
Credit: 1 Hour (15 hours class). 

106. THE COMMUNITY AND THE Nf//?5£. Introduction to the community through 
field trips, group projects, oral and written reports. 

Mrs. OVERH^LSER. 

Credit: 1.5 Hours (25 hours class). 

28 




Practice in nursing care is under the guidance of instructors in the various cHnical 
departments. 




Individual rooms make it possible for students to plan their time for study or 
recreation. 




During a field assignment in public health nursing, the student goes into the coni- 
nuniity lor experience in family health guidance and home care of the sick. 




The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, located at 68th Street and the East 
River, covers three city blocks— 68th to 71st Streets— and includes The New York 
Hospital, the Cornell University Medical College and the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing. 



DESCRIP I ION OF COURSES 29 

107. PSYCHO SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF NURSING I. Considers the 
ways in which concepts and methods from the behavioral sciences may be incorporated 
and utiHzed in nursing. Deals with cultural, psychological and social components of 
human behavior with particular emphasis on the way such knowledge may be ap- 
plied to total patient care. 

Mrs. MACGREGO R and special lecturers. 
Cfeclit: 1 Hour (15 hours class). 

108. PSYCHO-SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF NURSING 11. A more ad- 
vanced and intensive exploration of the aspects outlined in Course 107. 

Mrs. MACGREGOR and special lecturers. 
Credit: 1 Hour (15 hours class). 

109. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF NURSING. An overview of the history of 
nursing, tracing particularly what has constituted nursing and conditions and factors 
which have strengthened or weakened it. Presented against a background of the 
developments in religion, science, medicine, hospitals and public health. Readings in 
both primary and secondary sources. 

MissMcVEY^ 

Credit: 2 Hours (30 hours class). 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

115. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 
Study of the public health sciences of epidemiology, vital statistics, environmental 
health, and public health organization and administration as they apply to public 
health nui^ing. 

M i n9«XILL!^^I I and special lecturers. 
Credit: 2 Hours (30 hours class). 

116. PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING AND RELATED CONFER 
ENCES. Supervised field experience in one of three agencies which offer a generalized 
public health nursing service, the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, the Visiting 
Nurse Association of Brooklyn, and the Westchester County Department of Health. 
Group study of concurrent experience in public health. Examination of programs, 
policies and practices in the light of basic public health principles. Conferences, 
seminars and special projects. 

Miss CLARK, Miss DISOSWAY, Miss TVRIE, Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 
Credit: 3.5 Hours (30 hours class, 6 or 8 weeks practice*). 



OUT-PATIENT (AMBULATORY) NURSING 

118. NURSING IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. Nursing care of ambula- 
tory patients, both children and adults, is taught through medical and nursing lec- 
tures, demonstration, planned group conferences, seminars, and individual supervised 
practice. Selected clinics in the medical, surgical, pediatric, and dental clinics provide 

* Special study now in progress determines length of experience. 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

experiences in giving direct care and in teaching the patient general heakh principles i 
and self-care. Emphasis is placed on cooperation with other professional workers and 
the use of community resources for prevention and control of disease and for follow- 
up care and rehabilitation of the patient. 

Faculty of the Department of Out-Patient Nursing. 
Credit: 4 Hours (35 hours class, 6 weeks practice). 



FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 
AND ALLIED COURSES 

120. ORIENTATION. Students are introduced to the program of the School, the 
physical facilities of the Center, the plan of dormitory living and the health main- 
tenance program. 

Members of the Faculty and Staff of the Medical Center. 
Credit: Hours (15 hours class). 

121. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING. An introduction to nursing practice designed 
as a foundation for all Clinical Nursing courses. Content is planned to help the student 
develop an understanding of the basic components of professional nursing care and of 
the principles underlying procedures commonly used in the treatment of patients. 
Supervised practice on patients' unit. 

MissJB£RG, Miss DWYER, Mrs. LYON, and others. 
Credit: 8.5 Hours (106 hours class, 124 hours laboratory). 

122. PHARMACOLOGY. Designed to give the student information and methods basic 
to administration of medicines; facts and principles of drug therapy, study of com- 
monly used drugs, responsibility of the nurse, methods of calculation of dosage. 

Credit: 1.5 Hours (25 .hours class and laboratory). 

123. NURSING IN LONG TERM ILLNESS. Emphasis is on prevention, care and 
rehabilitation in chronic illness. Consideration is given to the basic needs and prob- 
lems of these patients and to the needs of the nurse in providing comprehensive care. 
Practice in the hospital and field trips to community agencies which cooperate in 
providing care needed by patients with a long term illness. To better assess the needs 
of these patients, students work as partners. Practice is carried out with selected 
patients. Consideration is given to the nurse's relationships with patients and other' 
health workers* 



Miss GJSfe0OKS and others. 

Credit: 4 Hours (33 hours class, 8 weeks practice). 

124. EMERGENCY NURSING. General principles of emergency care of patients isil 
taught through lecture, group discussion and other selected group activities. Particu 
lar emphasis is placed on the nurse's professional and civic responsibilities in disaster, 
including first aid, direct patient care, and use of community resources to give im 
mediate medical attention, and to provide shelter care and rehabilitation services. 

Miss WARREN. 

Credit: 1 Hour (14 hours class). 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

125. PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP IN NURSING CARE. During the last term of 
the program, the student is guided in considering some of the special responsibilities 
of professional nurses. These include the improvement of patient care through ad- 
ministrative and supervisory technics, through individual and group teaching and 
through planned investigation. Professional problems and relationships are explored 
including legislation, education, organizational activities and employment practices. 
The student cares for selected patients who have complex nursing needs and partici- 
pates in the management of the pavilion. 
Faculty from several departments. 
Credit: 3.5 Hours (30 hours class, 6 weeks practice). 



NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION. Normal adult nutrition based on the courses in Biochemistry and 
Physiology. A study of the functions and food sources of the major food groups, their 
availability in the world and in the community, the needs of the individual and 
relationship of cultural patterns to food habits and nutrition are included. (The 
nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are discussed during the stu- 
dent's practice on pediatric and obstetric services.) 

Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss GIST. 
Credit: 0.5 Hours (II hours class). 

131. DIET THERAPY AND FOOD PREPARATION. Designed to present the under- 
lying principles in the treatment of disease by diet. It is accompanied by laboratory 
work in principles of food preparation, and in the preparation of foods and meals 
included in therapeutic diets. The course is implemented by clinical conferences 
during the student's practice on medical, surgical, obstetric and pediatric services. 
Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss GIST. 

Credit: 1 Hour (36 hours laboratory). 

132. DIET THERAPY PRACTICE. The application of the principles of diet therapy 
to tbo care and teaching of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the 
Hospital. Through conference discussions, integrated with the practice assignment, 
the student is oriented to the practical application of her knowledge of nutrition 
and diet therapy in the care of hospitalized and ambulatory patients. 

Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss GIST, Miss STEPHENSON and Staff. 
Credit: 1.5 Hours (8 hours class, 4 weeks practice). 



MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICAL NURSING. The nursing care of patients with medical and neuro- 
logical diseases is considered. Discussion of the medical aspects include etiology, 
symptomatology, pathology, prognosis, usual course and complications. Prevention, 
case finding methods and treatment are also considered. Supervised practice is offered 
in the application of nursing principles to the care of patients on the medical and 
neurological pavilions of the hospital. Emphasis is on planning nursing care in terms 
of the individual patient's needs, utilizing the resources within the Medical Center 
as w'ell as those within the community. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Medicine. 
Credit: 7.5 Hours (68 hours class, 12 weeks practice). 



32 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SURGICAL NURSING 

144. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF DISEASES. Focus is on those principles which 
are basic to the etiology, prevention and treatment of diseases requiring surgical 
intervention. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Operating Room and Surgery. 
Credit: 2 Hours (30 hours class). 

145. SURGICAL NURSING. The care of surgical patients is presented by conference 
and demonstration. Individualized care, planned instruction, and rehabilitation of 
the patient are stressed. Planned experience in meeting patients' needs through guided 
practice in surgical asepsis, pre- and post -operative teaching and therapeutic team 
relationship. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Surgery. 
Credit: 6.0 Hours (45 hours class, 12 weeks practice). 

146. ORTHOPEDIC NURSING. Emphasis is on the responsibilities of the nurse in 
the care, rehabilitation and prevention of crippling disorders. Long-range planning, U 
coordinated efforts of the health team and teaching of patient and family are included. 
Students participate and observe in the care of selected patients. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Hospital for Special Surgery. 
Credit: 2 Hours (15 hours class, 4 Aveeks practice). 

147. UROLOGIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Anomalies and diseases of the 
genito-urinary tract, management, and nursing care. Special consideration of the 
nursing needs of patients undergoing gynecologic or urologic treatment. Planned care 
during pre- and post-operative phases with emphasis on the emotional aspects of such 
disorders, and preparation for self-care on discharge. Leadership of the nursing team. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Departments of Surgery and Obstetrics-Gyne- 

cology. 

Credit: 3 Hours (15 hours class, 8 weeks practice). 

148. OPERATING ROOM NURSING. Students are taught the principles and meth- 
ods of aseptic technique in relation to the care of patients at the time of operation. 
Through supervised practice and observation at the surgical field and in the immedi- 
ate pre- and post-operative periods the foundation is laid for the understanding of 
the nurse's role in the care of the surgical patient and for the understanding of 
patients' needs created by surgical intervention. 

Faculty of the Department of Operating Room Nursing. 
Credit: 3.5 Hours (32 hours class, 6 weeks practice). 



MATERNITY AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING 

150. MATERNITY NURSING. Focuses on the family as a social unit, the reproductive 
process as it affects personal and family life, and the characteristics of the newborn 
infant. The biological and social sciences are drawn upon in developing principles 
basic to maternity and gynecologic nursing. The student is guided toward developing 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 33 

increased awareness of the emotional aspects of the entire female reproductive cycle. 
Comprehensive care of motliers and infants with related experience in the out-patient 
clinics, labor and delivery floor and the rooming-in units. Guided olxservation of the 
special health problems of women in the out-patient clinics. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Credit: 8 Hours (78 hours class, 12 weeks practice). 



PEDIATRIC NURSING 

IGO. PEDIATRIC NURSING. A study of the representative disease conditions of 
infancy and childhood against a background of the normal physical and emotional 
needs of infants, children, and their families. Guided experiences in the use of knowl- 
edge in the care of premature infants, sick infants and children, and of children in 
Nursery School. Group conferences, demonstrations and comprehensive nmsing studies. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Pediatrics. 
Credit: 8 Hours (75 hours class, 12 weeks practice). 



PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

170. PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. History, pathology and treatment of psychiatric 
illness, and the basic principles involved in the nursing care of patients with person- 
ality disorders, from infancy to old age. The program helps the student develop an 
understanding of self and relationships to others, an objective attitude toward psychia- 
tric illness and the nurse's role in helping the patient solve the problems of his illness. 
Supervised experience in the observation and care of the emotionally ill patient during 
the acute phase of illness and convalescence. Participation in currently approved 
therapies, including psychotherapy, occupational and recreational therapies, and 
somatic therapies. Guided practice in creating a therapeutic and socially rehabilitative 
environment for patients. 

Medical and Nursing Faculties of the Department of Psychiatry. 
Credit: 8 Hours (82 hours class, 12 weeks practice). 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

175. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Teaches the fundamentals of body mechanics, various 
team and individual sports, and modern dance. It aims to develop sufficient skill in 
these activities to enable the student to use leisure time to greater advantage. 



J' Mrs. HAZEL. 

I! Credit: Hours (52 hours class). 



ADMINISTRATION 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL - 
CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Director 

JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 



?< Arthur H. Dean ^ ^ , ^ ^ 

^ Stanton Griffis \ Board of Trustees of 

Deane W. Malott J C°™^" University 

Francis Kernan, Chairman ^ Board o£ Governors of 

Hamilton Hadley I The Society of 

Frederick K. Trask, Jr. J the New York Hospital 

Frederic W. Ecker 

COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

S. S. Atwood, Chairman Provost, Cornell University 

Muriel R. Carbery, R.N Dean, School of Nursing 

John E. Deitrick, M.D. . . Dean, Cornell University Medical College 
Mrs. Charles Ensign .... President, Committee for Scholarships 

Frank Glenn, M.D President, Medical Board, 

The New York Hospital 
Joseph C. Hinsey Director, The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 

^RuTH Irish Member-at-Large 

Mrs. Helene J. Jordan Memher-at-Large 

Louis M. LoEB . Governor, The Society of the New York Hospital 

' Mrs. Thomas Mackie Trustee, Cornell University 

Deane W. Malott President, Cornell University 

Walsh McDermott, M.D Prof essor of Public Health and 

Preventive Medicine, Cornell University Medical College 

Lucille Notter, R.N Assistant Director, Visiting 

Nurse Association of Brooklyn 
Elizabeth Ogden, R.N. . . Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Mrs. Charles Payson Governor, The Society of 

the New York Hospital 

Henry N. Pratt, M.D Director, The New York Hospital 

XMrs. Samuel Rosenberry Member-at-Large 

y Howard S. Tyler Prof essor in Personnel Administration 

New York State College of Agriculture, Cornell University 

34 



ADMINISTRATION 35 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Deane W. Maloix A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., D.C.S President, 

Cornell University 

Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Associate Dean 

Mary T. McDeriMOTT, M.A Director of the Residence 

Carolyn Diehl, M.D School Physician 

Mrs. Ena Stevens-Fisher^ R.N. . . . Supervisor, Nurses Health Service 

Tracy Dwyer Registrar 

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth RiDDiCK Registrar for Admissions 

Meimi Joki Executive Secretary for the School 

Mrs. Frances Baillie Secretary to the Associate Dean 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Dorothy Metzger '47 President 

Marguerite Plow '30 Executive Secretary 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. Charles Ensign President 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PRE-NURSING 
TUDENTS ON THE ITHACA CAMPUS 



)ffice of the Dean of Men, Dean of Women 
VmoiniA Pt»A ' it Vocational Counselor (CJiairman) 



ollege of Home Economics 

Jean Failing Professor of Home Economics, 

lfg(B Chairman of Counseling Service 

(iii'iKollege of Arts and Sciences 

\\\m F. G. March am Professor of History 

mm RoLLiN L. Perry Associate Dean 



ollege of Agriculture 

Howard S. Tyler Professor iji Personnel Administration 

L,,l (Vocational Guidance Placement) 
ffice of Admissions 
Robert Storandt Associate Director 



FACULTY 



Deane W. Malott, A.B., M.B.A., LL.D., D.C.S., President of the University 

Muriel R, Carbery, M.S., R.N., Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 

Florence Tritt, M.A., R.N., Assistant to the Dean 

Mary Jo Munroe, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Librarian 

Ruth Ernest. M.A„ R.N.. Assistant in Admissions 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriett Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursi7ig 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

Verda F. Hickox, M.A. , K.N ., Prof essor Emeritus of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 

Mary Klein, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Surgical Nursing 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 



PROFESSORS 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean, School of Nursing. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Medical Nursing; Department 
Head, Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, 1939, 
B.S., 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1949.) 

Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Dean, School of 
Nursing; Director, Nursing Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of America, 
1951.) 

Frances C. Macgregor, M.A., Visiting Associate Professor of Social Science. (A.B., 
University of California, 1927; M.A., University of Missouri, 1947.) 

* Audrey McCluskey^ M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Department Head, 
Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1945; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1948.) 

* Leave of absence 1959-1960. 

36 



FACULTY 37 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing; 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 1944.) 

Henderika J. Rynbercen, M.S., Associate Professor of Science. (B.S., Simmons College, 
1922; M.S., Cornell University, 1938.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing; Departrnent 
Head, Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in 
Nursing, W'^estern Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1932.) 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Norma Cavaglieri, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing (Mental Health). 
(Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935; B.A., Blue Moun- 
tain College, Blue Mountain, Mississippi, 1936; M.A. (Educational Psychology), New 
York University, 1949; M.A. (Mental Health), Columbia University, 1951.) 

Mary Jeanne Clapp, M.N., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing (Orthopedics); 
Director, Nursing Service, The Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.A., Mount Holyoke 
College, 1940; M.N., Yale University School of Nursing, 1943.) 

Elinor Fuerst Dahlke, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Administrative 
Assistant to the Dean. (Diploma in Nursing, Christ Hopsital School of Nursing, Jersey 
City, N. J., 1937; B.S., Columbia University, 1946; M.A., 1951.) 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of 
Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Department 
Head, Operating Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Denver General Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1946; B.A., Toronto University, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 
1957.) 

Helma Fedder, M.N., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Wa,shington University School of Nursing, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942; M.N., University of Washington, 
1954.) 

Lilian Henderson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 
1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1951.) 

Elizabeth Hosford. M.A., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant Professor of Obstetric Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (B.S., Keuka College, 1947; ALA.. Columbia 
University, 1952; Certificate in Midwifery, Maternity Center Association, N.Y., 1953.) 

Vera R. Keane, ALA., R.N., C.N.AL, Assistant Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Acting Department Head, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, 1940; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1949; ALA., 1957; Certificate in Midwiferv, Maternity Center Association, 
N.Y., 1951.) 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Eleanor Muhs, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Nursing; Director, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of Nursing, Roch- 
ester, N.Y., 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1954.) 

M. Eva Paton, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing; De- 
partment Head, Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, 1930; Diploma 
in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; M.A., New York University, 
1950.) 

Doris Schwartz, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical Out-Patient Nursing; 
Supervisor, Comprehensive Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, New York, 1942; B.S., New York 
University, 1953; M.A., 1958.) 

Laura L. Simms, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing; Department 
Head, Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., Texas State College for Women, Denton, Texas, 
1940; Diploma in Niusing, Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas, 1945; 
M.Ed., Southern Methodist University, Dallas, 1950.) 

Mary Stewart. ALS., Counselor of Students. (B.A., Elmira College, 1926; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1950; Professional Certificate in Guidance and Personnel, Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1956) 

Ethel Marie Tschida, M.A. , R.N. , Assistant Professor in Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing; 
Supervisor, Pediatric Out-Patient Clinic, (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School 
of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Ind., 1944; Diploma 
in Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 

1958.) 

Margie A. Warren, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Out-Patient Nursing; Depart- 
ment Head, Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Protestant Deaconess 
Hospital School of Nursing, Evansville, Ind.; B.S., Indiana University, 1949; M.A. 
Columbia University, 1957.) 

* Lucille Wright, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Science. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; B.A., University of Colorado, 1950; 
M.S., Cornell University, 1955.) 



INSTRUCTORS 

Genrose J. Alfano, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nurs- 
ing; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 1947; B.S., 
Bridgeport University, Bridgeport, Conn., 1953; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 

Helen Berg, M.A,, R.N., Instructor in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
Cornell University, 1951; M.A., Columbia University, 1958.) 

Mary Bielski, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1958.) 

* Leave of absence 1959-1960. 



FACULTY 39 

Frances Lucretia Bovle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Out- 
patient Nursing: Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1945.) 

GvLA Brooks, B.A., R.X., R.P.T., Instructor in Nursing (Long-term Illness and Re- 
habilitation). (B.A., \Vestern Reserve University, 1931; Diploma in Nursing, Mercy 
Hospital School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1936; Certificate in Physical Therapy, 
D. T. \Vatson School of Physical Therapy, 1943.) 

Marie Caruso, M.A., R.N., Instructor, Medical Out-Patient Nursing; Supervisor, 
Comprehensive Care Clinic, Out-Patient Department. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell 
University, 1952; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 

Florence M. Chapin, M.A., M.S., R.N., Instructor in Science. (B.S. in Nursing, Uni- 
versity of Rochester, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1957; M.S., 1958.) 

Constance Derrell, M.A., R.N., C.N.M., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Lincoln School of Nursing, New 
York, 1938; B.S., New York University, 1945; Midwifery Certificate, Tuskegee Insti- 
tute, Ala., 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1948.) 

Kathleen Duver, NLA., R.N., Instructor in Fundamentals of Nursing. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital School of Nursing, Providence, R.I., 1948; B.S. in 
Nursing, University of Rhode Island, 1954; M.A., Columbia University, 1958.) 

* Jean French, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Public Health Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
Cornell University, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1955.) 

Carol C. Fripp, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.A., Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C, 1944; Diploma in Nursing, 
Meharry Medical College School of Nursing, Nashville, Tenn., 1948; M.A., New York 
University, 1959.) 

Ianthe C. H.arris, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Evening Supervisor , 
Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Lincoln School of Nursing, New 
York, N. Y., 1947; B.S., Columbia University, 1952; M.A., 1958.) 

Eva Hazel, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. (B.P.H.E., University of Toronto, 
1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1948.) 

Louise Hazeltine, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (B.A., Bucknell University, 1946; B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 
1949.) 

Pauline Alice Hevmann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas School of 
Nursing, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Gladys Tyson Jones, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Recovery 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Columbia University, 1951.) 

* Leave of absence 1959-1960. 



40 SCHOOL OF NURSING 



J 



Theresa Loszewski, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medio 
Nursing Service. (B.S., State Teachers College and Diploma in Nursing, Medical Center 
School of Nursing, Jersey City, New Jersey, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1952.) 

Martha B. MacLeod, M.A., Instructor in Science (Physiology). (B.A., Smith College, 
1938; M.A., Syracuse University, 1950.) 

Frances McVey, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing (Public Health). (Diploma in 
Nursing, Mary Immaculate Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 1946; B.S., St. 
John's University, 1954.) 

Dorothy Metzger, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1947; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1953.) 

Marjorie T. Nebesky, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Assistant Di- 
rector, Psychiatric Nursing. (B.S., Wayne University, Detroit, Mich., 1951.) 

Edith Margaret Nugent, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. (B.S., University of Manitoba, 1944; Diploma in Nursing, Winni- 
peg General Hospital School of Nursing, 1956.) 

Anna M. Ondovchik, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. John's General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Pittsburgh, 194^; B.S., Duquesne University, 1946; M.A., St. John's 
University, 1957.) 

Irma K. Riley, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Montreal General Hospital School of Nursing, 1948; j 
B.S., Columbia University, 1955; M.A., 1958.) 

Mary Rothschild, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor in Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
1954; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1954.) 

Virginia Shea, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursi72g; Supervisor, Medical Nurs- ' 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing and B.S. 
in Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 

* Je.\nne Sherman, B.S., R.N. Instructor in Obstetric Nursing, Assistant Supervisor, 
Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Skidmore College, 1947; B.S., Skid- 
more College, 1947.) 

i 

Dean Smith, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing (Orthopedics); Education • 
Director, The Hospital for Special Surgery. (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1952; M.A., 1955.) 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, N. Y., 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

* Leave of absence 1959-1960. 



FACULTY 1 1 

Margaret H. Terry, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nurs- 
ing; Supei-visor, Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital School of Nursing, Manchester, N. H., 1935; B.S., 
Boston University, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1957.) 

Grace Wallace, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., University of California, San Francisco, 1942; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1956.) 



FROM THE FACULTY OF 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

John E. DEmiicK, M.D Dean 

OsKAR DiETHELM, M.D Profcssor of Psychiatry 

R. Gordon Douglas, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Vincent DU ViGNEAUD, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D Professor of Surgery 

m% John G. Kidd, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D Professor of Medicine 

Walsh McDermott, M.D. . . . Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

I James M. Neill, Ph.D Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

; Robert F. Pitts, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Walter F. Riker, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Roy C. Swan, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

\V 

1?; 



id 






ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 

ASSISTANTS IN INSTRUCTION 

Marjorie H. Agnew, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Xursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1940; B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1952.) 

Miriam K. Bergen, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jersey City Medical Center School of Nursing, 
1945; B.S., Columbia University, 1951; M.A., 1957.) 

Carmella Brescia, B.S., R.N., Assistant iii Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Nursing: 
Supervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service. (B.S., Syracuse University, 1955.) 

David A. DePeter, M.S., Assistant in Science (Biochemistry). (B.S., St. John's College, 
Brooklyn, 1953; M.S., 1956.) 

Jeianne Burns Dorie, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nurs- 
ing, Cornell University, 1958.) 

Claire-Ann Gist, B.S., Assistant in Science and Nutrition. (B.S., Iowa State College, 
Ames, Iowa, 1956.) 

Eleanor Keep Harle, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Science. {h.S. in Nursing, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1958.) 

Jeanne Harquail, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
University of Colorado, 1953.) 

Bernice Loughlin, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Public Health Nursing, (Navajo-Cornell 
Field Health Project^ Arizona). (B.S., Northwestern University, and Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Evanslon Hospital School of Nursing, 1937.) 

Elizabeth P. Lvon, B.S. , R.N. , Assistant in Fundamentals of Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, 
Cornell University, 1955.) 

Claire Meyerowitz, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1945; M.A., 
New York University, 1957.) 

Helene Rizzo, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing. (B.S. in Nursing, Cornell 
University, 1958.) 



LECTURERS 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures 

Cornell University Medical College 

42 



1 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 43 

STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henry N. Prait, M.D Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Edna E. Tuffley, M.A., R.N Associate Director, Nursing Service 

Mary Joanna Foster, M.N. , R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

Helen V. Miller, R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N Evening Administrative Assistant 

Elizabeth Simmons, M.A., R.N Night Administrative Assistant 

DjuIng, M.S Relief Administrative Assistant 

Elizabeth McKeown, M.A., R.N Administrative Assistant for 

Professional In-service Education 

Martha Weller, B.S., R.N Assistant in Staff Education 

Eleanor Young, R.N Assistant in Staff Education 

Jane D. Curtis, B.S., R.N Administrative Assistant, Medical Nursing Service 

Ruth M. Brockman^ R.N Night Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service 

Katharine Gaulocher, R.N Evening Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service 

Jean Johnston^ M.A., R.N Evening Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service 

Susan Myerson, R.N Night Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service 

Julia Dennehy^ M.A., R.N. . . Administrative Assistant, Surgical Nursing Service 
Margaret Eklund, M.A., R.N. . .Administrative Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 

Mary Pozniak, M.S., R.N Administrative Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 

Ruth E. Kenney, M.A., R.N Evening Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 

LoRETTA Kilfoyle, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 

Eugenia Piszczatowska, M.A., R.N. . Evening Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 
Alice M. DonDero, M.A., R.N. .Administrative Assistant, Pediatric Nursing Service 

Isabel Cameron, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service 

Louise Gallo^ R.N. . . Assistant Supervisor-Instructor, Pediatric Nursing Service 

Janet Stevens, R.N Night Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service 

Dorothy Douyard, R.N Administrative Assistant, Obstetric and 

Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Dorothy Anderson, M.A., R.N Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service 

Miriam Bergen, M.A., R.N Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service 

Virginia D'Agostino, B.S., R.N. . . Supervisor-Instructor, Obstetric Nursing Service 

Jane Geoghan, M.A., R.N Supervisor, Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Dorothy Jackson, B.S., R.N Relief Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic 

Nursing Service 
Martha Jackson, R.N Night Supervisor, Obstetric and 

Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Thelma Mathews, R.N Assistant Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service 

Celerina Miguel, M.A., R.N Evening Supervisor, Obstetric and 

Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Althea Taylor, R.N Night Supervisor, Obstetric Nursing Service 

Inez Gnau, R.N Evening-Night Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 

Beatrlce McKee, R.N Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 

Jessie Weaver, R.N Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 

Mary Whitaker, R.N Evening-Night Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 



44 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Carolyn Wagner, R.N. . . Administrative Supervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service 

Ena D. Fisher, R.N Supervisor, Personnel Health Service 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.N. . Supervisor, General Operating Room Nursing Service 

Antoinette Bosco, M.A., R.N Administrative Supervisor for In-Service, 

Operating Room Nursing Service 

Eloise Cooke, R.N Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating Room Nursing Service 

Lucy Hickey, R.N Supervisor, Private Operating Room Nursing Service 

Salome Husted, R.N Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Room 

Nursing Service 

Lenore M. Ahalt, B.S., R.N Assistant Supervisor -Instructor , Private 

Patients Nursing Service 
Lois Cantrell, B.Ed., R.N Administrative Supervisor, Private Patients 

Nursing Sewice 

LuDviNA Kroemer, B.S., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Nursing Service 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N. . . Night Supervisor, Private Patients Nursing Service 
Agnes Morgan, B.S., R.N. . . Supervisor-Instructor, Private Patients Nursing Service 
Inez Mullins, B.S., R.N. . . .Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Nursing Service 

Lefa Rose, R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Nursing Service 

Kathleen M. Young, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients 

Nursing Service 

Maude Damd, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Nursing Service 

Lydia H. Hansen, R.N Instructor of Auxiliary Staff 

John A. Payne, R.N Assistant Instructor of Auxiliary Staff 

Olga Romanelli, B.S., R.N Evening Assistant Instructor of Auxiliary Staff 



HEAD NURSES 



MEDICINE 



Abraham, Marilyn, B.S. 
Buehler, Meta, B.S. 
Cutright. Rosemary 



Greisen, Claire, B.S. 
Ibsen, Doris 



Lagerquist, Elaine, B.S. 
Skelley, Kathleen 



SURGERY 



Bello, Gloria 
Besecker, Shirley 
Caron, Theresa, B.S. 
Cheroniak, Tillie 



OPERATING ROOM 

Bosco, Antoinette, B.S. 
Brodzinski, Bernadine 
Burley, Wanda, B.S. 
Burnett, Dorothy 
Chaves, Itoko 
Collins, Margaret, B.S. 
Davies, Helen 



Cotterell, Margaret, B.S. 
Huxster, Marilyn, B.S. 
Kelly, Irene, B.S. 
LaMarche, Lois 



Edmundson, Ida 
Farmer, Rosemary 
Kehrli, Nancy 
McCready, Esther 
Maclnnis, Mora 
Nielsen, Genevieve 
O'Connor, Christine 



Lubowska, Nina 
Pruchnik, Blanche 
Sullivan, Elizabeth 



Raboy, Jeannette 
Rau, Rozalia, B.A. 
Scarlato, Victoria 
Schultz, Rosemarie 
Sulette, Mary, B.S. 
Westphal, Freda 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 



45 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Bott, Alma 
Colwell, Anna 
Conner, Agnes 
Greenberg, Elizabeth 
Hammond. Grace 



Hanson, Rosemary 
Jones, Anne 
Leonardo, Yolanda 
Matus, Veronica 
O'Rourke, Mary, B.S. 



Schaffner, Jeanne, B.S. 
Taggart, Eleanor 
Trice, Ida 
Young, Kathleen 



OUT-PA TIENT DEPARTMENT 



Aikins, Helen L.,M.A. 
Bartlett, Mary 
Budovic, Geraldine, B.S. 
Carman, Edna 
Clark, Evelyn 



Cronin, Eileen 
Evans, Alberta 
Foley, Alice 
Hoiikom, Magda 



Liddle, Evelyn 
Riker, Anne 
Schaefer, Anna 
Toter, Roseanne 



PRIVATE PATIENTS 



Bosco, Rosemarie, B.S. 
Coyle, Patricia 
Gerchak, Helen 



PEDIA TRIGS 



Allen, Phyllis 
Bertagna, Elda 



Janora, Helen, B.S. 
Kozitsky, Mary 
Moker, Ann 



Frenk, Myra 
Graves, Elizabeth 



PSYCHIATRY (Payne Whitney Clinic) 



Brown, Delora, B.S. 
Davis, Carrie 



Hibbard, Alta 
McCarthy, Margaret 



NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 



Louise Stephenson, M.S., Director 



Jeanne Beduhn, B.S. 
Emily Krogg, B.S. 
LiLi Li, M.S. 
t Marilyn Marvel, B.S. 



Reynolds, Mary 
Smith, Anne 



Horton, Johanna 



Stanton, Mercy 
Traynor, Elizabeth, B.S. 



Claudia Mathis, B.S. 
Susan Paige, B.S. 
Emma Paris, M.S. 
\'irginia Pearson Snyder, B.S. 



C\rol Sullivan, B.S. 
Milagros Uy, B.S. 
Nancy Vosburgh, B.S. 



OCCUPATIONAL AND RECREATIONAL THERAPY 



Evt^-MSzurtB.A., O.T.R. 
Mildred Spargo, O.T.R. 
Grace C. Xewberg, B.A. 



Director, Occupational Therapy, Main Hospital 

Director, Occupational Therapy, Psychiatry 

Director, Recreational Therapy, Psychiatry 

- ^irr r tnr Occupational Thfrapv.Pfdintrin 



46 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A Social Service Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel, A.B Social Service Director, The Lying-l7i Hospital 

EuzABETH F. Hewitt, M.A Chief Social Worker, Payne Whitney Clinic 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Anna Fillmore, M.P.H Executive Director} 

and stafiE Visiting Nurse Service of New York 

Eleanor W. Mole, B.S., R.N Executive Director, 

and staff Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn 

Anne McCabe, M.A., R.N. , Director ^Division of Public Health Nursing 

and staff Westchester County Department of Health 



NURSERY SCHOOLS 

Mrs. Eleanor Blumgart, M.A Director of Nursery School 

Department of Pediatrics 

Elizabeth Bull, M.A Co-director, New York School for Nursery Year.\ 

Mrs. Dorothy Cleverdon, M.A Educational Director, Summer Play School: 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL 



CLASS OF 1960 

Same 

Allen. Barbara Emily 
Barber, Carol Evans 
Cameron, Dorothy Helen 
Cary, Carolyn Louise 
Champoux, Barbara Anne 
Clark, Catherine Cory 
Cormack, Judith Ann 
Curtis. Elizabeth Barnaby 
Damadian, Claudette Jeanne 
Dickerson, Doris Ann 
Eichert, Carol Esther 
Eshleman, Fay Elizabeth 
Farrcll, Margaret 
Fonde, Mary Lou 
Fray, Carol Patricia 
Gideon, Zoe A. 
Giffin, Barbara Jean 
Gittleman, Estelle Fay 
Greenleaf, Janet Kathryn 
Hager, Kathleen Audrey 
Hamilton, Carol Olivia 
Harrold, Barbara Jill 
Heffernan, Mary Susan 
Heyneman, Elizabeth Anne 
Johnson, Betty Rose 
Katzmark, Katherine Ann 
Kenvin, Mona Lee 
Koshatzkv, Mary Ann Claire 
Lanning, Maureen D. 
Larson, Judith Anne 
Leitzow, Nancy Adeline 
Levy, Marian Carol 
Lynch. Barbara 
Marr, Anne Theresa 
Mattson, Joanne Lee 
McCollum, Patricia Smith 
Moorhead, Marilyn Ann 
Moran, Patricia Ann 
Morgan, Martha Jane 
Morris, Barbara Christman 
Morrish, Gay Emily 
Moyer, Alice Ann 
Nelson, Rosemary Elizabeth 
Polonko, Julia 
Reinhardt, Janet Louise 
Roberts. Sandra Alice 



Address 

Little Neck, N. Y. 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 
\Vantagh, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Greenwich, N. Y. 
New Hartford, N. Y. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Morgantown, ^V^ Va. 
Forest Hills. N. Y. 
Snyder, N. Y. 
Orwigsburg, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Marshfield, Mass. 
Houtzdale, Pa. 
St. Albans, N. Y. 
Kalamazoo. Mich. 
Dcland, Fla. 
Belle Harbor, N. Y. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
Little Neck, N. Y. 
Burnt Hills, N. Y. 
^ Vest wood, N. J. 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Brunswick. Ga. 
Andover, N. J. 
Flushing. N. Y. 
Astoria, N. Y. 
Flushing, N.Y. 
Lakewood, Ohio 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Kew Gardens Hills, N. Y. 
Glendale, N. Y. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Manhasset, N. Y. 
Port Jervis, N. Y. 
Pennington, N. J. 
Brooklvn. N. Y. 
Rock Hill, S.C. 
Peekskill, N. Y. 
New Providence, N. J. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Caldwell. N.J. 
Pluckemin, N. J. 
Mattituck,N.Y. 
Rochester, N. Y. 



College from 

which Transferred 

Queens College 

Pembroke College 

St. Lawrence University 

Cornell University 

Cornell University 

Cornell University 

Ohio University 

West Virginia University 

Drew University 

Cornell University 

Ursinus College 

Hershey Junior College 

University of Massachusetts 

Dickinson College 

Hunter College 

Hope College 

Denison University 

Brooklyn College 

Wittenberg College 

Bates College 

Bates College 

Pine Manor College 

St. Elizabeth College 

Scripps College 

Emory University 

Douglass College 

Queens College 

St. Joseph's College 

Fordham University 

College of Wooster 

Cornell University 

Queens College 

Hood College 

Mount Holyoke College 

Cornell University 

Hartwick College 

Hood College 

Fordham University 

Agnes Scott College 

Drew Universitv 

Hood College 

Gettysburg College 

Susquehanna University 

Drew University 

Douglass College 

Cornell Universitv 



47 



48 SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name 

Rogers, Susan Geer 
Rubin, Civianne 
Russo, Maria Theresa 
Schmalz, Ann Friedman 
Shiffer, Elizabeth Ann 



A ddress 

Au Sable Forks, N. Y. 
Milford, Conn. 
Bayside, N. Y. 
Highland, N. Y. 
Meriden, Conn. 



Shuttleworth, Barbara Roberta Wilmington, Del. 



Simonson, Carol Lee 
Steel, Jean Elizabeth 
Stocking, Patricia Joan 
Stokes, Barbara 
Sullivan, Clarra Mae 
Walsh, Joan Bridget 
Wood, Leona Anne 
Zacharias, Carol Christine 



Hingham, Mass. 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Hornell, N. Y. 
Sunnyside, N. Y. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Hanover, Pa. 



College from 
which Transferred 
Wells College 
Mount Holyoke College 
Adelphi College 
Cornell University 
Eastern Baptist College 
Wilson College 
St. Lawrence University 
Michigan State University 
Cornell University 
Middlebury College 
Northwestern University 
Marymount College 
Douglass College 
Susquehanna University 



CLASS OF 1961 



Alexander, Janet Phyllis 
Avery, Deborah Ann 
Beck, Jacqueline Virginia 
Bissell, Mary Josephine 
Blair, Margaret Torrence 
Blatt, Ruth Beverly 
Burfeind, Barbara-Ann 
Burggraaff, Gertrude 
Cahoon, Joan Elizabeth 
Cobb, Dorothy Louise 
Cozzie, Barbara Marie 
Crowley, Mary Anne 
Damone, Margaret Frances 
Dornemann, Ruth 
Dunning, Marcia Shankland 
Easter, Margaret Eleanor 
Etoll, Faith Elizabeth 
Evans, Marjorie Elizabeth 
Farris, Sally-Jeane 
Finlay, Ruthann 
Frantz, Virginia Mae 
Fredrickson, Lenore Geneve 
Gallaher, Carolyn M. 
Gratz, Margot Gerstley 
Harton, Marilyn Byrd 
Hershey, Virginia Stebbins 
Irvine, Sylvia Ross 
Irving, Ann Marie 
Iverson, Carol Ann 
Jenkins, Sally Esther 
Kaefer, Barbara Louise 
Klee, Joan M. 



Derry, N. H. 
Hawthorne, N. Y. 
Woodhaven, N. Y. 
Ivoryton, Conn. 
Ashland, Mass. 
Haverstraw, N. Y. 
Stamford, Conn. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
Wolcott, N. Y. 
Presque Isle, Me. 
Ramsey, N. J. 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Tuckahoe, N. Y. 
Mineola, N. Y. 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Belfast, Maine 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Sunfield, Mich. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Jamestown, Pa. 
Elkins Park, Pa. 
Lansing, Mich. 
Garden City, N. Y. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
Portland, Me. 
Webster, N. Y. 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Ringwood, N. J. 



University of Rochester 
Bates College 
Queens College 
University of Connecticut 
Pine Manor Junior College 
Cornell University 
Jackson College 
Hope College 
Elmira College 
AVestbrook Junior College 
Bucknell University 
Rosemont College 
Concordia Junior College 
University of Rochester 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Northwestern University 
University of Maine 
Valparaiso University 
Manchester College 
University of Rochester 
Cornell University 
Bucknell University 
Michigan State University 
Simmons College 
William Woods College 
St. John's University 
University of Maine 
University of Rochester 
Oberlin College 
Douglass College 



STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL 



49 



Name 

Lloyd, Maicia Ellen 



Address 
Haraden, Conn. 

Lochner, Alice LaDovv Slingerlands, N. Y. 

Maitino, Carolyn Amelia Schenectady, N. Y. 

McKneally, Mary Ellen Jeanne Newburgh, N. Y. 



Meaney, Margaret Gail 
Million, Patricia Ann 
Nielsen, Sandra Elizabeth 
Noble, Vera Josephine 
Obrig, Alice Marie 
O'Regan, Patricia Marie 
Palumbo, Mildred Ann 
Paull, Laura Prugh 
Peachey, Helen Fuchs 
Powers, Janet Marie 
Roehrs, Jane Elizabeth 
Rothwell, Elizabeth Ann 
Rummelsburg, Julie Anne 
Rumpel, Barbara Jane 
Sacks, Arlene 
Selz, Judith Shapiro 
Stimson, Abigail Ann 
Stuebner, Elizabeth W. 
Sullivan, Ann Louise 
Trubek, Helen Fannie 
Varney, Edith Joyce 
Wagenseller, Frances Estella 
Welch, Martha Alice 
Wiedemann, Ruth Lois 
Wilmarth, Helen Emily 



Woodhaven, N. Y. 
Shelby, Ohio 
Hackensack, N. J. 
Winnetka, 111. 
Greenwich, Conn. 
New York, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Webster, N. Y. 
Leonia, N. J. 
Rutherford. N. J. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Chadds Ford. Pa. 
Redminster, N. J. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Beechhurst, N. Y. 
Spencer, N. Y. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Chevy Chase, Md. 
Parkland, Pa. 
Geneseo, N. Y. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Bayville, N. Y. 



College from 
which Transferred 
Bradford Junior College 
Chatham College 
Cornell University 
Marymount College 
Fordham University 
Manchester College 
University of Rochester 
Carleton College 
Simmons College 
Manhattanville College 
Fordham University 
Denison University 
University of Rochester 
Marywood College 
Hood College 
Hope College 
Wilson College 
Wells College 
Hofstra College 
Mount Holyoke College 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Bennington College 
Middlebury College 
Temple College 
Manhattanville College 
Concordia Collegiate Institute 
Cornell University 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the School as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible background 
preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

To receive information, fill out and return the following: 

Miss Muriel R. Carbery, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

1320 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information which 
will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing school 
entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location 



Date diploma received or expected 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 

19.... 

(If you are in college) Please send me an application blank 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the Hospital or to the University with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

'7 give and bequeath to The Society of the New York Hospital 
(or '7 give and bequeath to Cornell University") the sum of 

$ for the Cornell University-New 

York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift to the School of Nursing shall be 
made in whole or in part for any specific purpose in the pro- 
gram of the School such use may be specified. 



i 



' 



INDEX 



Absences, 15 

Accreditation of the School, 5 

Activities, 15-17; Nurses Residence, 15- 
16; Alumnae Association, 18; recrea- 
tion, 16; marriage and residence, 17; 
school government, 16; counseling 
services, 17 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
31-46 

Admission, 10; general requirements, 
10; selection of a college, 10; educa- 
tion requirements, 10; age and health, 
12; application, 12; Cornell Advisory 
Committee on Pre-nursing Students, 
35 

Alumnae Association, 18, 35 

Anatomy, 21, 28 

Application for admission, 12, 51 

Assistant Professors, 37-38 

Assistants in Instruction, 42 

Associate Professors, 36-37 

Associated with the Faculty, 42-46 

Basic nursing program, 18; professional 

curriculum, 18-22 
Biochemistry, 21, 28 
Biological and physical sciences, 28 

Calendar, 3 

Clinics, 8-9 

College, Selection of, 10 

Committee for Scholarships, 25, 35 

Community and the Nurse, 21, 28 

Contents, 2 

Cornell University, 5-6; degree, 14; Ad- 
visory Committee on Pre-nursing Stu- 
dents. 35; Medical College faculty. 41 

Council of the School. 34 

Counseling services, 17 

Courses, description of, 28-33 

Curriculum, professional, 18-22 

Degiee, 14 

Description of courses, 28-33 



Diet Therapy, 21, 22, 31 

Early Child Development, 21, 28 
Educational requirements, 10-12 
Emergency Nursing, 21, 30 
Emeritus Professors, 36 
Expenses, 23-25 

Facilities for instruction, 7-9 
faculty, 36-41; associated with, 42-46 
Fees and expenses, 23; method of pay- 
ment, 24; maintenance, 24 
Financial aid, 25-27 
Fundamentals of Nursing and allied 
courses, 21, 30 

Graduation, 13-14; degree, 14 
Gynecologic nursing, 21, 32 

Head nurses, 44-45 
Health service, 14-15 
History of School, 5-7 
Historical Backgrounds of Nursing, 21, 
29 

Instructors, 38-41 

Joint Administrative Board, 31 

Lecturers, 42 

Libraries, 7-8 

Loan Fund, 26 

Long Term Illness. 22, 30 

Maintenance, 24 
Marriage, 17 

Maternity Nursing, 21, 32 
Medical Nursing, 21, 31 
Microbiology, 21, 28 

Neurological nursing, 31 

New York Hospital, 5-9; nursing super- 
visors, 43-44; liead nurses, 44-45; 
staff, 43-46 



53 



54 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Nurse in Public Health, 22, 29 

Nurses Residence, 15-16 

Nursing, Fundamentals of— and allied 

courses, 21, 30 
Nutrition, 21, 31 

Obstetric (iMaternity) Nursing, 21, 32 
Officers of Administration, 35 
Operating Room Nursing, 21, 32 
Orientation, 21, 30 
Orthopedic Nursing, 22, 32 
Out-Patient Department, 9, 19 
Out-Patient Nursing, 21, 29 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 9 

Pediatric Nursing, 22, 33 

Pharmacology, 21, 30 

Physical Education, 21, 33 

Physiology, 21, 28 

Professional Leadership in Nursing 
Care, 22, 31 

Professors, 36, 41 

Program, basic nursing, 18 

Promotion and graduation. 13-14; De- 
gree, 14 

Psychiatric Nursing, 22, 33 

Psycho-social and Cultural Aspects of 
Nursing, 21, 29 

Public health affiliations, 9, 20, 4G 

Public Health Nursing, 9, 22, 29 



Recreational facilities, 16 
Registration, State, 5 
Residence facilities, 15 

Scholarships, 25-27 

School government, 16 

Social Sciences, 28-29 

Social Service Departments, 46 

State registration, 5 

Student life and activities, 15-18 

Students now in School, 47-49 

Supervisors, nursing, 43-44 

Surgical Nursing, 21, 32 

Surgical Treatment of Diseases, 21, 32 

Term dates, inside front cover 
Tuition, 23 

Uniforms, 23-25 
Urological Nursing, 22, 32 

\'acations, 15 

\'isiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn, 

9, 29, 46 
\'isiting Nurse Service of New York, 9, 

29,46 

Westchester County Department of 
Health, 9, 29, 46 



10^ iC-/-^^^'^ 






fiife- 



wmm 







';..':<• 






■'ri(*i 













- 1 . / ' ' f-- '. ^